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Sunday, February 17, 2019

A spokesman for Brittany Kaiser, former business development director for Cambridge Analytica - confirmed that she had been subpoenaed by special counsel Robert Mueller, and was cooperating fully with his investigation. He added that she was assisting other US congressional and legal investigations into the company's activities and had voluntarily turned over documents and data. The news came to light in a new Netflix documentary, The Great Hack, which premiered at the Sundance film festival last month and is expected to be released later this spring. Film-makers followed Kaiser for months after she approached the Guardian, including moments after she received the subpoena.


Prime Minister Shinzo Abe nominated U.S. President Donald Trump for the Nobel Peace Prize last autumn after receiving a request from the U.S. government to do so, the Asahi newspaper reported Sunday. The report follows Trump's claim Friday that Abe had nominated him for the Nobel Peace Prize for opening talks and easing tensions with North Korea. The Japanese leader had given him "the most beautiful copy" of a five-page nomination letter, Trump said at a White House news conference.


Friday, February 15, 2019

Former Massachusetts governor Bill Weld told an audience in New Hampshire on Friday that he will try to take on President Trump in the 2020 Republican presidential primary, offering the first high-profile challenge to the president's reelection effort. Weld, 73, said he would seek to determine over the coming months if he can raise enough money to continue his challenge of the president. He said he would run on a traditional Republican agenda of fiscal responsibility and provide a stylistic contrast to Trump.


Wednesday, February 13, 2019

The 2016 nominating conventions had recently concluded and the presidential race was hitting a new level of intensity when Paul Manafort, Donald Trump's campaign chairman, ducked into an unusual dinner meeting at a private cigar room a few blocks away from the campaign's Trump Tower headquarters in Manhattan. Court records show Manafort was joined at some point by his campaign deputy, Rick Gates, at the session at the Grand Havana Room, a mahogany-paneled room with floor-to-ceiling windows offering panoramic views of the city. The two Americans met with an overseas guest, a longtime employee of their international consulting business who had flown to the United States for the gathering: a Russian political operative named Konstantin Kilimnik. read more


Tuesday, February 12, 2019

The debate over eliminating health insurance is actually offering a false choice. An international perspective is helpful here. When you look out at the rest of the world -- at the dozens of countries that run universal health care systems -- you find that every universal health plan relies, in some form or another, on private insurance. "Basically, every single country with universal coverage also has private insurance," says Gerard Anderson, a professor at Johns Hopkins University who studies international health systems. "I don't think there is a model in the world that allows you to go without it." read more


Comments

She won't try. If she fixed anything, it would end the need for her to complain about it.

What if those workers came and brought all the income tax for her to give to teachers and infrastructure and affordable housing and social programs? It would end her.

What if she is working with people to do some of the things you think she should:

"Finding better places than Amazon for the state to spend its money has become the focus of Queens State Assemblymember Ron Kim, who is preparing to introduce a bill to eliminate state corporate subsidies and instead spend the same cash on using state condemnation powers to seize and pay off New Yorkers' student loan debt. This would be an economic boon not just for state residents struggling under a debt load, argues Kim, but because allowing them to spend their paychecks locally rather than sending them directly to Navient would provide a huge boost for the local economy."

What if there is a potential downside to Amazon coming:

There are costs to hosting Amazon, too. The potential increased costs to the city and state for improved transit service and additional housing to support Amazon's workers have been widely discussed by now, but there are other costs too, from schooling for new city residents to the potential for lost tax revenue from other retail businesses that may be driven to bankruptcy as the result of Amazon getting a taxpayer-supported leg up. (Cuomo told Lehrer that while he didn't have numbers for the added public service costs required an Amazon headquarters, they would be "nowhere close to what they're paying" in taxes.)

Normally, those costs of new development are supposed to be accommodated by the property taxes and business taxes that flow from the arriving company -- but with $3 billion of those already carved out as tax breaks, New York will have less in the bank to pay its new Amazon-related bills.

gothamist.com

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