Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Maybe next week.

Meanwhile, the numbers in the opioid crisis keep getting worse. In 2016, more than 64,000 people died of drug overdoses in the US, according to provisional data released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) last week. That's a jump from more than 52,000 in 2015. The spike was driven largely by a rise in deaths from the synthetic opioid fentanyl, which was linked to nearly 20,000 overdose deaths in 2016, up from less than 10,000 in 2015, and surpassed common opioid painkillers and heroin in overdose deaths for the first time last year. Read more


The President rails against rules and wants other countries out of his room -- and his behavior has reversed a century's worth of political thinking. Read more


A drone has collided with a commercial aircraft in Canada, the first such incident in the country, according to the Transport Ministry. The drone struck one of the plane's wings, while six passengers and two crew members were aboard. The aircraft sustained only minor damage and was able to land safely, the Canadian transport minister said. Read more


In a lofty and at moments pointed speech, Sen. John McCain on Monday cautioned against the US turning toward "half-baked, spurious nationalism" during an event honoring the war hero's contributions.

Reflecting on his decades-long political history, McCain warned that to "fear" the world the US has led for the better part of a century, "abandon the ideals we have advanced around the globe" and "refuse the obligations of international leadership ... for the sake of some half-baked, spurious nationalism cooked up by people who would rather find scapegoats than solve problems" is unpatriotic.

"As unpatriotic," he continued, "as an attachment to any other tired dogma of the past that Americans consigned to the ash heap of history." Read more


The Michelle Obama public library in Long Beach, California, has presented to children who are part of its young readers program a huge array of diversity and "inclusion" agendas.

In one shot.

It was when Xochi Mochi arrived for a visit.

That made the program pro-LGBTQ.

And transgender.

And drag queen-friendly.

And Satanist-approved, with the character's red-tipped, demon-like horns.

All to read to children for LGBTQ History Month.

The following is a video of another such event, this one in New York. Read more


"We have a pathological liar in the White House: unfit intellectually, emotionally, and psychologically to hold this office," San Antonio coach says

San Antonio Spurs coach Gregg Popovich called Donald Trump a "soulless coward" following the president's false statements regarding former presidents calling the families of military members killed in action.

Popovich, an Air Force veteran, contacted The Nation soon after Trump's remarks. "I've been amazed and disappointed by so much of what this President had said, and his approach to running this country, which seems to be one of just a never ending divisiveness," Popovich said.

"But his comments today about those who have lost loved ones in times of war and his lies that previous presidents Obama and Bush never contacted their families, is so beyond the pale, I almost don't have the words." Read more


A good buddy of mine and former squadron mate, Dave "Sex" Fravor, has one of the most bizarre aviation stories of all time. It is a story that stretches credibility, so I'll start off by building up Dave's bona fides.

For what it's worth, I know him personally -- very well. We flew A-6s together for a cruise back in the Dark Ages before he matriculated into the Hornet world. He's a funny guy. Smart and sharp witted, with a typical fighter pilot's overestimation of his skills. (He'd read the SHB article and assured me his was way better than anything Nasty could do. I called B.S.–pretty standard.) In the air, though, Dave was all business, as professional as it gets.

It's easy to get a sense of who and what he is because his squadron was featured on the 10-part miniseries Carrier that aired on PBS. You get an excellent and accurate impression of him from his screen time as Commanding Officer of VFA-41. Read more


Dubai police have announced they will soon have officers buzzing around the skies on Star Wars-style electric hoverbikes capable of speeds of up to 70 kilometres per hour.
GIF: A pilot flies the Hoversurf Scorpion

The Hoversurf Scorpion was unveiled at the Gitex Technology Week conference, Gulf News reported.

The Russian-made craft can fly at a height of five metres and carry a police officer over congested traffic in emergency situations, First Sergeant Ali Ahmad Mohammad told Gulf News.

"The bike can also fly without a passenger and can go up to six kilometres," he said.

"It can fly for 25 minutes and can carry up to 300kg of weight at a speed of 70kph." Read more


Monday, October 16, 2017

This archipelago in the Gulf of Alaska is home to one of the busiest commercial fishing ports in the country. Inside the Ocean Beauty seafood plant in Kodiak, where a maze of conveyer belts carry gutted salmon past workers in hairnets and gloves, manager James Turner ticks off everything that contributes to his monthly electricity bill: canning machines, pressure cookers, freezers lights.

"We use a lot of power here," he says.

Plus, down the road is the nation's largest Coast Guard base and to the south is a state-owned rocket launch facility. It's no small feat, then, that the power for all of this is generated right here on the island, from almost entirely renewable sources.


Life is not so different beneath the ocean waves. Bottlenose dolphins use simple tools, orcas call each other by name, and sperm whales talk in local dialects. Many cetaceans live in tight-knit groups and spend a good deal of time at play.

That much scientists know. But in a new study, researchers compiled a list of the rich behaviours spotted in 90 different species of dolphins, whales and porpoises, and found that the bigger the species' brain, the more complex – indeed, the more "human-like" – their lives are likely to be. Read more


Following Monday's bizarre impromptu Rose Garden press conference where President Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell pretended to like each other and pledged unity in giving their rich friends tax breaks and dismantling the healthcare system the president is actively sabotaging, the two leaders shared a tender moment while leaving the presser and returning to the White House. Read more


Brian Benczkowski, a former aide to Jeff Sessions, will soon be in a position to share information about the grand jury investigation with the president.

On September 28, the Senate Judiciary Committee approved on a party line vote the nomination of Brian Benczkowski to be the head of the Justice Department's criminal division. The vote put President Donald Trump one step closer to installing a potential mole at the department, with the ability to inform him of any wiretaps or significant developments in special counsel Robert Mueller's grand jury investigation into the possible ties between Russia and the Trump campaign. Read more


An investigative journalist in Malta who exposed her island nation's links to offshore tax havens using the leaked Panama Papers was killed in a car bombing on Monday, an attack that shocked Malta and was condemned by leaders of the European Union. Read more


Whistleblower Joe Rannazzisi says drug distributors pumped opioids into U.S. communities -- knowing that people were dying -- and says industry lobbyists and Congress derailed the DEA's efforts to stop it

In the midst of the worst drug epidemic in American history, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration's ability to keep addictive opioids off U.S. streets was derailed -- that according to Joe Rannazzisi, one of the most important whistleblowers ever interviewed by 60 Minutes. Rannazzisi ran the DEA's Office of Diversion Control, the division that regulates and investigates the pharmaceutical industry. Read more


Two months ago, the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) notified astronomers around the world of the possible detection of gravitational waves from the merger of two neutron stars. From that moment on August 17, the race was on to detect a visible counterpart, because unlike the colliding black holes responsible for LIGO's four previous detections of gravitational waves, this event was expected to produce a brilliant explosion of visible light and other types of radiation. Read more


Standing during the National Anthem, the players knelt during the moment of silence for a fallen cop. The fans boo'd Read more


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