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Wednesday, December 17, 2014

A man who shot and killed a 17-year-old German exchange student caught trespassing in his garage was convicted of deliberate homicide Wednesday in a case that attracted attention as a test of self-defense laws that govern the use of deadly force to defend life and property. Markus Kaarma, 30, shot 17-year-old high school student Diren Dede in the early hours of April 27 after being alerted to an intruder by motion sensors. Prosecutors maintained that after a previous burglary, Kaarma was intent on luring an intruder into his garage and then harming that person. That night, Kaarma left his garage door partially open with a purse inside. read more


MISSOULA, Mont. (AP) -- A Montana man who shot and killed a German exchange student caught trespassing in his garage was convicted of deliberate homicide Wednesday despite arguing that a state "castle doctrine" law allowed him to use deadly force to protect his home and family.

Cheers erupted in the packed courtroom when the verdict in the case of Markus Kaarma, 30, was read. The parents of the victim, 17-year-old Diren Dede, hugged and cried.

"It is very good," Dede's father, Celal Dede, said with tears in his eyes. "Long live justice."


Monday, December 08, 2014

War was the leading cause of death in the military nearly every year between 2004 and 2011 until suicides became the top means of dying for troops in 2012 and 2013, according to new data from a Pentagon medical statistical analysis journal. For those last two years, suicide outranked war, cancer, heart disease, homicide, transportation accidents and other causes as the leading killer, accounting for about three in 10 military deaths each of those two years. More than 6,800 troops have died in Iraq and Afghanistan since 9/11 and more than 3,000 additional service members have taken their lives in that same time, according to Pentagon data.


Saturday, December 06, 2014

This preference for low investment tragically "makes sense" given the "alignment" of executives and shareholders.
We should expect SVM to lead to increased payouts as both the shareholders have increased power (inherent within
SVM) and the managers will acquiesce as they are paid in a similar fashion. As Lazonick and Sullivan note, this
led to a switch in modus operandi from "retain and reinvest" during the era of managerialism to "downsize and
distribute" under SVM.

Evidence of the rising payout amongst nonfinancial firms can be found in Exhibit 12. As one would expect under
SVM, we have witnessed a marked increase in payouts over time. In the era of managerialism, somewhere between
10% and 20% of cash flow was regularly returned to shareholders. Under the rule of SVM this has risen significantly,
reaching 50% of cash flows just prior to the Global Financial Crisis.


Saturday, October 11, 2014

A Raleigh County, West Virginia, man pleaded guilty Thursday to repeatedly faking compliant water quality standards for coal companies, in a case that raises questions about the self-reporting system state and federal regulators use as a central tool to judge if the mining industry is following pollution limits. In a criminal charge filed in early September, Assistant U.S. Attorney Blaire Malkin alleged that John W. Shelton took part in a conspiracy from the time of his hiring at Appalachian Laboratories in 2008 through at least June 2013. In an agreed-to "stipulation of facts" filed in court Thursday, prosecutors and Shelton said that, throughout his time with the company, another Appalachian Laboratories official -- referred to as "First Known Person" -- stressed to him the importance of "pulling good samples," a term that was understood to mean samples that would comply with permit limits, not necessarily samples that were taken properly.


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