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Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Weekly Digest

The following front-page stories received the most comments during the preceding week.

If Paris streets burned over a proposed 25 cents per gallon climate change tax, imagine the global conflagration over a $49 per gallon tax. That's what a United Nations special climate report calls for in 12 years, with a carbon tax of $5,500 per ton -- equal to $49 per gallon of gasoline or diesel. That's about 100 times today's average state and federal motor fuels tax. read more


"It's like a manhood thing with him -- as if manhood can be associated with him," Pelosi deadpanned. "This wall thing."


To understand Venezuela's collapse, the Guardian travelled hundreds of miles across the nation Chávez dreamed of transforming, from the spot in downtown Caracas where he gave his first speech as president-elect to his birthplace in the country's sun-scorched southwestern plains.


President Donald Trump has agreed to a request from Defense Secretary James Mattis to propose a defense budget of $750 billion for the coming year, marking a reversal from plans to shrink defense spending, an administration official confirmed to CNN. Last week, Trump appeared to call the Defense Department budget of $716 billion "crazy" in a tweet. The next day Mattis and key Republican lawmakers who oppose any defense budget cuts met with the President for lunch to discuss military funding.


The coalition that fought Obamacare repeal has fragmented as the party tries to follow through on campaign promises and the united front that helped Democrats save Obamacare just a year ago is falling apart over single-payer health care.


California officially became the first state in the nation on Wednesday, Dec. 5 to require homes built in 2020 and later be solar powered. To a smattering of applause, the California Building Standards Commission voted unanimously to add energy standards approved last May by another panel to the state building code. read more


At a certain point, another million dollars doesn't make anything newly affordable. That's when other motivations take over. As the number of millionaires and billionaires in the world climbs ever higher, there are a growing number of people who possess more money than they could ever reasonably spend on even the lushest goods. But at a certain level of wealth, the next million isn't going to suddenly revolutionize their lifestyle. What drives people, once they've reached that point, to keep pursuing more?


Trump tweets: "Totally clears the President. Thank you!" read more


In a study published Monday (Dec. 10, 2018) in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers show that humans are reversing a long-term cooling trend tracing back at least 50 million years. And it's taken just two centuries.


Sources close to the president say he has repeatedly shrugged off the national debt, implying that he doesn't have to worry about the money owed to America's creditors -- currently about $21 trillion -- because he won't be around to shoulder the blame when it becomes even more untenable.


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