Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News

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Wednesday, March 20, 2019

plus a few people being paid for talking into a microphone... read more


Tuesday, March 12, 2019

from the horseface's mouth... "it's not worth it... because... there's zippo there. never was. it was a sham from day one. sorry"


Monday, March 11, 2019

The first is the Department of Justice's own The Mueller Report: The Final Report of the Special Counsel into Donald Trump, Russia, and Collusion, which is being published by Skyhorse Publishing and has an introduction by U.S. lawyer Alan Dershowitz. The full report can be purchased for $12.99 and has a release date of March 26. The second publication is The Washington Post's The Mueller Report, which is priced at $15 and is also set to be released on March 26. Shirley there is a smoking gun... read more


Sunday, March 03, 2019

That didn't take long... #Obstructiongate


Friday, March 01, 2019

NO retraction on Russiagate from Rachel Maddow. NO retraction on Russiagate from CNN What do they do instead of admitting error? They move the goal posts and start chanting- It's Bigger than Russia! ha ha ha ha ha.


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So, upon the opening of the crossfire hurricane investigation, we had a number of discussions up through and including the Director regularly in which we were trying to find an answer to the question, right, which is, is there someone associated with the [Trump] campaign who is working with the Russians in order to obtain damaging information about Hillary Clinton," states Page.

Don't need to go at a total breakneck speed because so long as he doesn't become President, there isn't the same threat to national security, right," Page added.

"But if he becomes President, that totally changes the game."

Ohr and Page Testimony On Steele Don't Match Up

Moreover, Page contradicts Ohr's testimony regarding when she first knew about former British spy Christopher Steele's dossier. She claims in her testimony that she did not know about the dossier in August 2016, however, Ohr's testimony reveals that he delivered Steele's information to the bureau shortly after meeting with Steele. In fact, he met with former Deputy Director Andrew McCabe and specifically, Page at the bureau to deliver the information.

Ohr explains that prior to that meeting with McCabe and Page he had met with Steele on July 30, 2016.

"After the July 30th meeting with Chris Steele, I wanted to provide the information he had given me to the FBI. I reached out for Andrew McCabe, at that time, Deputy Director of the FBI and somebody who had previously led the organized crime, Russian organized crime squad in New York and who I had worked with in the past, and asked if he could meet with me," he said.

"I went to his office to provide the information, and Lisa Page was there. So I provided the information to them. And some point after that, I think, I was given Peter Strzok, or somehow put in contact with Peter Strzok."

Gowdy then asks when exactly did Ohr meet Strzok and Page.

"I'm guessing it would have been in August since I met with Chris Steele at the end of July, and I'm pretty sure I would have reached out to Andrew McCabe soon afterwards."

Yep.

The narrative, shared by President Vladimir Putin, his top lieutenants and state television, is strikingly similar to U.S. President Donald Trump's description of the investigation as a "witch hunt:" They say the whole process is about the Democrats' stubborn refusal to admit that they lost the election.

"They don't want to acknowledge his victory and do everything to delegitimize the president," Putin said at his annual news conference in December.

Mueller has been looking into whether the Trump campaign coordinated with Russia and whether the president obstructed the investigation.

Trump has been widely criticized for failing to publicly denounce Russia's interference in the 2016 U.S. election and appearing to accept Putin's denials of such activity. Trump's relationship with Putin has long been the source of intrigue, both at home and in world capitals. He has repeatedly praised his authoritarian peer while straining ties with many of Washington's closest allies.

In one indictment, Mueller has accused Russia's military intelligence agency GRU of hacking into the Democratic campaign and releasing the stolen emails through WikiLeaks. Another has charged employees of a Russian troll farm allegedly controlled by Yevgeny Prigozhin, a businessman dubbed "Putin's chef" for his ties to the Kremlin, with spreading disinformation on social media in a bid to bolster support for Trump and disparage his rival, Hillary Clinton.

The Kremlin has rejected those charges.

Last week, Russian state television stations jumped at the relatively mild sentence handed to former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort as proof that Mueller's investigations have failed to hit their target.

"The mountain gave birth to a mouse," the state-controlled Rossiya television snapped while reporting on Manafort, who was sentenced to nearly four years in prison for tax and bank fraud related to his work advising Ukrainian politicians -- much less than what was called for under sentencing guidelines.

Another state-controlled nationwide channel, NTV, described the sentence as a blow to Mueller. "It was a slap in the face for special counsel Robert Mueller and his investigation into the Russian collusion that has found no collusion whatsoever," it said.

Yep.

The narrative, shared by President Vladimir Putin, his top lieutenants and state television, is strikingly similar to U.S. President Donald Trump's description of the investigation as a "witch hunt:" They say the whole process is about the Democrats' stubborn refusal to admit that they lost the election.

"They don't want to acknowledge his victory and do everything to delegitimize the president," Putin said at his annual news conference in December.

Mueller has been looking into whether the Trump campaign coordinated with Russia and whether the president obstructed the investigation.

Trump has been widely criticized for failing to publicly denounce Russia's interference in the 2016 U.S. election and appearing to accept Putin's denials of such activity. Trump's relationship with Putin has long been the source of intrigue, both at home and in world capitals. He has repeatedly praised his authoritarian peer while straining ties with many of Washington's closest allies.

In one indictment, Mueller has accused Russia's military intelligence agency GRU of hacking into the Democratic campaign and releasing the stolen emails through WikiLeaks. Another has charged employees of a Russian troll farm allegedly controlled by Yevgeny Prigozhin, a businessman dubbed "Putin's chef" for his ties to the Kremlin, with spreading disinformation on social media in a bid to bolster support for Trump and disparage his rival, Hillary Clinton.

The Kremlin has rejected those charges.

Last week, Russian state television stations jumped at the relatively mild sentence handed to former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort as proof that Mueller's investigations have failed to hit their target.

"The mountain gave birth to a mouse," the state-controlled Rossiya television snapped while reporting on Manafort, who was sentenced to nearly four years in prison for tax and bank fraud related to his work advising Ukrainian politicians -- much less than what was called for under sentencing guidelines.

Another state-controlled nationwide channel, NTV, described the sentence as a blow to Mueller. "It was a slap in the face for special counsel Robert Mueller and his investigation into the Russian collusion that has found no collusion whatsoever," it said.

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