Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Monday, May 20, 2019

The National Weather Service's San Francisco office said that through May 22 the state is expected to get 150-200% of its normal monthly rainfall. It's all thanks to a series of "atmospheric rivers" that will set up over the Pacific Ocean, moving into California.

Advertisement

More

Comments

Admin's note: Participants in this discussion must follow the site's moderation policy. Profanity will be filtered. Abusive conduct is not allowed.

One of the effects of global climate change is weather extremes that will only get worse.

#1 | Posted by Nixon at 2019-05-20 07:47 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

www.youtube.com

#2 | Posted by qcp at 2019-05-20 08:53 AM | Reply

Its perfectly "normal", if you understood the PDO.

Dec 5, 2018
What follows is our 2018-2019 winter outlook for the Lower 48, with a particular emphasis on regions expected to be at risk of intense rain events.
This is particularly relevant to this winter's forecast since El Nino conditions are currently developing in the east Pacific, with a weak-to-moderate El Nino event expected to be active through the winter and possibly into spring.
metstat.com

Good luck in your continued ignorance.

#3 | Posted by AndreaMackris at 2019-05-20 09:35 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

Speaking of ignorance

Isn't it fashionable for today's "Christian" to say that god is punishing them

Except when the persons are Mississippi podunks, then it's all "nothing can be done"

#4 | Posted by ChiefTutMoses at 2019-05-20 09:46 AM | Reply

Its perfectly "normal", if you understood the PDO.

#3 | POSTED BY ANDREAMACKRIS

Really?

Because the article says they are going to get,,, what was it?

"150-200% of its normal monthly rainfall."

So, yeah.

Good luck in your continued ignorance.

#5 | Posted by MrSilenceDogood at 2019-05-20 09:53 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 5

Been seeing this every few years since 1968 when local floods knocked out the bridge forcing us to take buses rather than take a 10 minute walk to school.

Going to be a beautiful green spring here. Great year for yosemite waterfalls. Hope none of you visit and spoil it.

#6 | Posted by nullifidian at 2019-05-20 09:56 AM | Reply | Funny: 1 | Newsworthy 1

FFS....Bitch about drought, bitch about rain, bitch about heat, bitch about cold...

#7 | Posted by MUSTANG at 2019-05-20 09:57 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

California is trying to emulate Michigan?

We've had an absolutely terrible spring with no end in sight.

According to my weather app, this is the 10-day forecast where I live:

Today - 54/cloudy
Tue - 64/cloudy
Wed - 72/thunderstorms
Thu - 81/cloudy
Fri - 78/cloudy
Sat - 77/cloudy
Sun - 74/cloudy
Mon - 75/thunderstorms
Tue - 76/cloudy
Wed - 71/thunderstorms

The only redeeming thing about that forecast is the temperatures. So far this month we've struggled to even get into the 60s.

Oh, and I have a 4-day weekend for Memorial Day up in Boyne City. Let's take a peek at the forecast as of now...

Thu - 67 Partly sunny (We are heading up Thursday after work, so the weather that day doesn't really matter)
Fri - 70/thunderstorms
Sat 69/rain showers
Sun 66/cloudy
Mon 66/rain showers

Doesn't that sound lovely? I can't wait.

#8 | Posted by JeffJ at 2019-05-20 09:57 AM | Reply

#3 that link doesn't at all support your contention that this is normal.

Either you knew that and are lying or you did t and you're commenting on something above your pay grade.

#9 | Posted by jpw at 2019-05-20 09:58 AM | Reply

------- about drought, ----- about rain, ----- about heat, ----- about cold...

It's all due to "climate terror." We never had weather that deviated from statistical seasonal norms in California before. lol.

#10 | Posted by nullifidian at 2019-05-20 10:05 AM | Reply

Advertisement

Advertisement

Either you knew that and are lying or you did t and you're commenting on something above your pay grade.

#9 | POSTED BY JPW AT

No way.

It's normal to have 150 - 200% more of anything that you normally would.

Don't you see that?

#11 | Posted by MrSilenceDogood at 2019-05-20 10:05 AM | Reply | Funny: 1

--Doesn't that sound lovely? I can't wait.

Does sound lovely to me. Guess it's a matter of taste.

#12 | Posted by nullifidian at 2019-05-20 10:06 AM | Reply

The drought is over, the forests are wet.
Sounds pretty good.

#13 | Posted by phesterOBoyle at 2019-05-20 10:07 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

#3 that link doesn't at all support your contention that this is normal.
Either you knew that and are lying or you did t and you're commenting on something above your pay grade.

#9 | POSTED BY JPW AT 2019-05-20 09:58 AM | FLAG:

Well get off your ---- computer then. You are contributing to climate change hypocrite!

#14 | Posted by fishpaw at 2019-05-20 10:10 AM | Reply

--It's normal to have 150 - 200% more of anything that you normally would

You're stupid. We have above-normal seasons and below-normal seasons. What's normal is season-to-season variation.

#15 | Posted by nullifidian at 2019-05-20 10:16 AM | Reply

What's normal is a 150 - 200% increase in rainfall.

#15 | POSTED BY NULLIFIDIAN AT

Rrriiiiiggghhhtttt.

You're half right.

One of us is stupid.

It's not the one you picked though.

#16 | Posted by MrSilenceDogood at 2019-05-20 10:22 AM | Reply

It's funny how the thread is about an area getting 8 weeks worth of rain in a matter of days and the best thing the rrriiiiiggghhhtttt can offer up is "happens all the time, nub. Want to help? Turn off your PC.. "

#17 | Posted by MrSilenceDogood at 2019-05-20 10:47 AM | Reply

Never happened before = happens all the time

-right wing math

#18 | Posted by hatter5183 at 2019-05-20 11:02 AM | Reply

Yeah, you're ignorant.

"The biggest rain season on record for downtown Los Angeles was 38.18 inches in 1883-84."

#19 | Posted by nullifidian at 2019-05-20 11:09 AM | Reply

38.18 inches in 1883-84."

#19 | POSTED BY NULLIFIDIAN

It probably happened over a 4 day or so span too.

So yeah, exactly the same.

Just turn off your PC, that will fix it.

#20 | Posted by MrSilenceDogood at 2019-05-20 11:37 AM | Reply

#19 uses an abnormal year's worth of rainfall that happened in the late 1809s to tell everyone how common the next week or so in California is going to be.

And he called someone else an idiot whilst doing it.

Interesting dot dot dot

#21 | Posted by MrSilenceDogood at 2019-05-20 11:57 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

1800s*

#22 | Posted by MrSilenceDogood at 2019-05-20 11:57 AM | Reply

Just turn off your PC, that will fix it.

#20 | Posted by MrSilenceDogood

You should do that and spare us your felonious ignorance. More importantly, never move to California. We already have a surplus of nuts.

#23 | Posted by nullifidian at 2019-05-20 12:03 PM | Reply

Nulli calling somebody else's ignorance felonious. Lol

You've joined the crew that epitomizes ignorance and yet think you'll be taken seriously when commenting on ignorance.

#24 | Posted by jpw at 2019-05-20 12:49 PM | Reply

#14 I think we'd get more benefits from you simply permanently holding your breath.

#25 | Posted by jpw at 2019-05-20 12:49 PM | Reply

#8 | Posted by JeffJ

Look on the bright side: it'll be great for mosquito breeding :-)

#26 | Posted by AMERICANUNITY at 2019-05-20 01:03 PM | Reply

I hadn't even thought about that, AU.

You know how bad the mosquitoes are in Michigan when it's dry.

With all of this wet weather they are going to be like locusts.

#27 | Posted by JeffJ at 2019-05-20 01:05 PM | Reply

Re: #3

Well, if you have an understanding of the PDO and ENSO, then you're ready for this:

www.climate.gov

#28 | Posted by TrueBlue at 2019-05-20 01:23 PM | Reply

#27 | Posted by JeffJ

Remember the old joke about mosquitoes being the state bird of Michigan?

#29 | Posted by AMERICANUNITY at 2019-05-20 02:27 PM | Reply

It's normal to have 150 - 200% more of anything that you normally would.
Don't you see that? - #11 | Posted by Mrsilencedogood at 2019-05-20 10:05 AM

I hear that in the month of December there is going to be even more than the 150-200% of the normal spending that occurs in the average month.
In short, welcome to what averages mean.

#30 | Posted by Avigdore at 2019-05-20 02:30 PM | Reply

It's normal to have 150 - 200% more of anything that you normally would.
Don't you see that? - #11 | Posted by Mrsilencedogood at 2019-05-20 10:05 AM

I hear that in the month of December there is going to be even more than the 150-200% of the normal spending that occurs in the average month.
In short, welcome to what averages mean.

#31 | Posted by Avigdore at 2019-05-20 02:30 PM | Reply

Remember the old joke about mosquitoes being the state bird of Michigan?

#29 | POSTED BY AMERICANUNITY

Yep. I just thought about that joke today during lunch.

#32 | Posted by JeffJ at 2019-05-20 02:30 PM | Reply

wow, sorry for the double post.

#33 | Posted by Avigdore at 2019-05-20 02:30 PM | Reply

#32 | Posted by JeffJ

These would help ameliorate the mosquito problem a lot:

www.nwf.org

#34 | Posted by AMERICANUNITY at 2019-05-20 02:35 PM | Reply

It's actually been a very nice May in California, 60s and low 70s.

But I'm worried about July and August. Maybe even September.

It's summer going to hit us with a vengeance?

I hope not. 110+ degree days last summer were brutal.

#35 | Posted by ClownShack at 2019-05-20 02:35 PM | Reply

The park downtown has a bunch of bat houses. Bats are certainly a great way to combat mosquitoes.

We get our yard sprayed and it's pretty effective.

#36 | Posted by JeffJ at 2019-05-20 02:41 PM | Reply

#35 I've got the exact opposite concern. Are we going to have a year without a summer? It seems to happen once every decade in Michigan and we are due.

#37 | Posted by JeffJ at 2019-05-20 02:42 PM | Reply

I hear that in the month of December there is going to be even more than the 150-200% of the normal spending that occurs in the average month.
In short, welcome to what averages mean.

#30 | Posted by Avigdore

It's amazing how desperately you guys are trying to dance on this one.

Average May rainfall amounts are about 1".

www.usclimatedata.com

There are cities mentioned in the article that set single day rainfall records with 5".

But please, keep straining to write this off a variation of the norm.

#38 | Posted by jpw at 2019-05-20 03:02 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

In short, welcome to what averages mean.

#31 | POSTED BY AVIGDORE

Right.

Plus there was that year in the late 1800s when it rained as much in an entire year as it's going to rain in the next 6 days, so no big deal.

#39 | Posted by MrSilenceDogood at 2019-05-20 03:08 PM | Reply

So yeah, exactly the same.
Just turn off your PC, that will fix it.

#20 | POSTED BY MRSILENCEDOGOOD AT 2019-05-20 11:37 AM | FLAG:

Stop driving, car pool, ride a bike, stop using fossel fuels. How much electricity is produced using fossel fuels? What powers your PC? Get it now? Didn't think so.

#40 | Posted by fishpaw at 2019-05-20 03:21 PM | Reply

#40 is the deepest thinker on the entire site.

Seriously.

#41 | Posted by MrSilenceDogood at 2019-05-20 03:25 PM | Reply

Well, the 2 months are May and June. May's average is less than an inch. Throw in September (one day rain avg) and make it 3.

#42 | Posted by DixvilleNotch at 2019-05-20 03:31 PM | Reply

All this story proves is that we get downpours from time to time in California. I could have told you that in 1969, when my family survived the Great Flood of '69. Don't believe me? There's pics! We even had cameras in those days.

www.pe.com

www.google.com

#43 | Posted by nullifidian at 2019-05-20 03:53 PM | Reply

According to science, our species will evolve to adapt to whatever the future holds.

Maybe we grow a new organ that feeds on CO2 and methane, or plastic and nuclear fuel dumps.

The naysayers are just dinosaurs, who don't want their bones discovered in a tar pit.

Get out of Darwin's way, you bunch of future fossils.

#44 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2019-05-20 03:57 PM | Reply

"According to science, our species will evolve to adapt to whatever the future holds."

No, science doesn't say that.

Stay in school, kids!

#45 | Posted by snoofy at 2019-05-20 04:08 PM | Reply

#40 is the deepest thinker on the entire site.
Seriously.

#41 | POSTED BY MRSILENCEDOGOOD AT 2019-05-20 03:25 PM | FLAG:

It's people like you who get up on their soap box and yell to us that there is a problem but won't tell us how they will personally contribute to help solve the problem. All you do is yell at every one who disagrees and blame them for the so called problem when maybe you should actually do some thing about it yourself. Is that too deep for you? Most likely.

#46 | Posted by fishpaw at 2019-05-20 04:15 PM | Reply

"It's people like you who get up on their soap box and yell to us that there is a problem but won't tell us how they will personally contribute to help solve the problem."

Would you start believing global warming was true if only he drove a Prius?

If not, then why bring it up?

#47 | Posted by snoofy at 2019-05-20 04:18 PM | Reply

"It's people like you who get up on their soap box and yell to us that there is a problem but won't tell us how they will personally contribute to help solve the problem."
Would you start believing global warming was true if only he drove a Prius?
If not, then why bring it up?

#47 | POSTED BY SNOOFY AT 2019-05-20 04:18 PM | FLAG:

No, but it gets tiresome to hear these people telling everyone something needs to be done but not coming up with a solution. And it is even worse coming from the likes of Al Gore who said the world should be finished, what was it 10 years ago?, and contributes to climate change in the self proclaimed worst way, flying private.

#48 | Posted by fishpaw at 2019-05-20 04:37 PM | Reply

"and contributes to climate change in the self proclaimed worst way, flying private."

In other words, you can't see the forest because of the tree named Al Gore.

Try seeing the forest. Just... try.

#49 | Posted by snoofy at 2019-05-20 04:52 PM | Reply

All of the climate data recorded is meaningless on a large space rock ball that is over 4 billion years old.

The core will cool eventually and the sun is predicted to die. Even that moon could crash into the earth as it loses centripetal force. You are not special.

Besides it's pretty much chinas fault. And Fukushima still melts.

#50 | Posted by mutant at 2019-05-20 05:09 PM | Reply

All of the climate data recorded is meaningless on a large space rock ball that is over 4 billion years old.
The core will cool eventually and the sun is predicted to die. Even that moon could crash into the earth as it loses centripetal force. You are not special.
Besides it's pretty much chinas fault. And Fukushima still melts.

#50 | POSTED BY MUTANT AT 2019-05-20 05:09 PM | REPLY |

Its going to be uninhabitable millions of years from now so lets do nothing.

parts on planes will eventually wear out so lets do nothing. stop doing maintenance now

bridges will eventually fail so lets do nothing. no fixing or replacing them

#51 | Posted by hatter5183 at 2019-05-20 05:19 PM | Reply

Are we going to have a year without a summer? It seems to happen once every decade in Michigan and we are due.

Not having a summer wouldn't be too bad for California. I do enjoy warmer days than what we're experiencing. But not dealing with droughts and fires would be great.

Although. I the colder weather could be having adverse effects on farming.

#52 | Posted by ClownShack at 2019-05-20 06:00 PM | Reply

Ah California.

Drought, fire, flood, drought, fire, flood, wash, rinse, repeat.

#53 | Posted by lee_the_agent at 2019-05-20 06:02 PM | Reply

Well lets ban indians from crapping in their rivers and chinese exported goods. That's the problem now. Stop feeling guilty you gullible american.

#54 | Posted by mutant at 2019-05-20 06:31 PM | Reply

Soon we'll hear about rich peoples homes getting mudslided.

#55 | Posted by mutant at 2019-05-20 06:57 PM | Reply

If only the rain could come at the same time as the forest fires.

#56 | Posted by Spork at 2019-05-20 07:03 PM | Reply

Let the mudslide begin...

#57 | Posted by lfthndthrds at 2019-05-20 07:44 PM | Reply | Funny: 1

California:

Shake and Bake, USA.

- Fred Sanford

#58 | Posted by lfthndthrds at 2019-05-20 07:46 PM | Reply

"Soon we'll hear about rich peoples homes getting mudslided."

Mudslides in California?

Is that... normal?

#59 | Posted by sentinel at 2019-05-20 09:23 PM | Reply

We used to call it the pineapple express when I lived in that communist country.

#60 | Posted by willowby at 2019-05-21 12:21 AM | Reply

If California is Communist, then Communism is an amazingly successful economic paradigm that brought us groundbreaking technological innovations, like the iPhone, and blue jeans.

Do you wear blue jeans, Willowby? I hear Jane Fonda does.

#61 | Posted by snoofy at 2019-05-21 12:32 AM | Reply

#61

She doesn't on the urinal target at my American Legion post.

#62 | Posted by willowby at 2019-05-21 01:03 AM | Reply

You better be glad nature is refreshing the water table in that overcrowded craphole.

You run out of water and climate control is going to be the least of your worries.

#63 | Posted by boaz at 2019-05-21 08:23 AM | Reply

Rain falling at that rate doesn't soak into the ground. Once the surface saturates it all runs right off.

My understanding is that CA's water is largely drawn from far inland, which means most of this will simply run off into rivers and out to sea, likely causing damage along the way.

#64 | Posted by jpw at 2019-05-21 08:59 AM | Reply

--Mudslides in California?

Is that... normal?"

Coming attractions. First we get a typical hot, dry summer that dries out the vegetation. Then comes wildfire season which burns off the vegetation that anchors the soil, leaving it unable to absorb the winter rains. Voila! Mudslides.

#65 | Posted by nullifidian at 2019-05-21 10:35 AM | Reply

2 months worth of rain in one week? For California? So, this means it won't be raining hardly at all?

#66 | Posted by moder8 at 2019-05-21 10:47 AM | Reply

"150-200% of its normal monthly rainfall."

Since that is the "new normal" we can say that CA will get some rain this week.

The new normal mud slides and flash flooding will follow.

Followed by nasty droughts and fires. Fires so intense they destroy entire towns.

This all 100% normal.

Now.

#67 | Posted by donnerboy at 2019-05-21 11:24 AM | Reply

"One of the effects of global climate change is weather extremes that will only get worse."

This is why climate change enthusiasts are getting less and less attention from the scientific community as a whole. Your statements are sounding like drug commercials now. Have a drought? Have a flash flood? Have big clouds? Have small clouds? Have no clouds? Have volcanoes? Have no volcanoes? Then get a dose of climate change! It is the answer for everything! Forget that it has side effects that may include incorrect data sets, inconsistent measurement techniques, email proof of collaboration by climate scientists to exaggerate findings, and many other things that scientists question but get no money to research, and it all gets swept under the rug anyways!

California has had droughts and floods all the time. Remember you said extremes, so that's what I'm reporting below. Sure doesn't look like there is any evidence of increasing extremes. There are trends, of course. And let's not forget that technology has improved and the definition of what a flood is and a drought is has changed. So, overall, your statement is wrong in the context of this article.

Historic droughts

3.1 1841
3.2 1863–1864
3.3 1924
3.4 1929–1934
3.5 1950s
3.6 1976–77
3.7 1986–1992
3.8 2007–2009
3.9 2011–2017

Floods in California

1.1 Los Angeles flood of 1825
1.2 January 1850
1.3 Years closely following January 1850
1.4 October 1858: Schooner-beaching storm surge in San Diego
1.5 December 1861 – January 1862: California's Great Flood
2.1 1909: California flood
2.2 December 1933 – January 1934: Crescenta Valley flood
2.3 February 1937: Santa Ana flood
2.4 December 1937: Northeast California flood
2.5 Los Angeles Flood of 1938
2.6 September 1939: Los Angeles River
3.1 November 1950: California flood
3.2 December 1955: California flood
3.3 March 1964: North Coast California tsunami
3.4 December 1964: California flood
3.5 September 1976: Ocotillo flash flood
3.6 January 1982: Northern California flood
3.7 1986 California and Western Nevada floods
3.8 January and March 1995: California flood
3.9 New Year's Day 1997: Northern California flood
4.1 August 2014: Coastal flooding due to "Big Wednesday" wave action
4.2 January 2017: California flood

#68 | Posted by humtake at 2019-05-21 12:25 PM | Reply | Funny: 1 | Newsworthy 1

This is why climate change enthusiasts are getting less and less attention from the scientific community as a whole.

Are you actually a member of the scientific community? No?

Then you can't possibly make this statement. I know you're not a member because it's a flat out lie.

The problem isn't the reiteration of nuanced conclusions, it's ignorant, arrogant lay people who think they're qualified to judge and comment.

#69 | Posted by jpw at 2019-05-21 01:03 PM | Reply

#68 | Posted by humtake

LOL only an idiot would think this makes the point you're asserting it does.

You guys, intentionally it seems, take the assertion of abnormality to mean "this is the first time it's happening" and then run with that erroneous, dishonest construct. Not surprising given you say garbage like this:

email proof of collaboration by climate scientists to exaggerate findings, and many other things that scientists question but get no money to research, and it all gets swept under the rug anyways!

The East Anglia "scandal" was an actual nothingburger. Only idiots who cling to their denialism assert otherwise.

#70 | Posted by jpw at 2019-05-21 01:06 PM | Reply

If you get virtually no rain for six months of the year and a ton of rain the other half of the year, is it surprising that in any given month the level is off from the average?

#71 | Posted by sentinel at 2019-05-21 01:45 PM | Reply

Rain falling at that rate doesn't soak into the ground. Once the surface saturates it all runs right off.

My understanding is that CA's water is largely drawn from far inland, which means most of this will simply run off into rivers and out to sea, likely causing damage along the way.

So if California is so smart, instead of making a super fast train to no where, why not make a rainwater collection system that covers the entire state? Instead of letting that water "run off" and go into the ocean, it could have been directed to man made resevoirs for storage when the next drought hits. Maybe then you wouldnt have to "draw water from far inland".

#72 | Posted by boaz at 2019-05-21 02:10 PM | Reply

California Set to get 2 Months of Rain in 1 Week

And they are too dumb to collect it for their next drought later this summer.

#73 | Posted by Sniper at 2019-05-21 02:15 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

www.climas.arizona.edu

There has to be a way to feed those under ground water tables. THAT is a big idea that needs refining. And I think it's a better use of NATIONAL taxes and money to fund something like that instead of a railway I will never ride on in a state I will never visit.

#74 | Posted by boaz at 2019-05-21 02:23 PM | Reply

www.lubbockonline.com

There has to be a way to "recharge" these under ground water tables with all the excess water from flooding around the country.

#75 | Posted by boaz at 2019-05-21 02:29 PM | Reply

en.wikipedia.org

This is what I'm talking about.

#76 | Posted by boaz at 2019-05-21 02:38 PM | Reply

And they are too dumb to collect it for their next drought later this summer.

#73 | POSTED BY SNIPER

They do "collect it", just like any other state does. California isn't the only place in the world that experiences drought.

If it were that easy just to "collect it", there wouldn't be a next drought anywhere.

#77 | Posted by Derek_Wildstar at 2019-05-21 02:42 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

If it were that easy just to "collect it", there wouldn't be a next drought anywhere.

I never said it was easy. That's why we elect national leaders. But it's something monumental along the lines of going to the moon. A national run off collection grid. When one area of the nation is having a drought, we should be able to just flip some switches and move water from one area to another.

#78 | Posted by boaz at 2019-05-21 02:53 PM | Reply

"During the 2011-16 California drought, politicians and experts claimed that global warming had permanently altered the climate, and that snow and rain would become increasingly rare in California. As a result, long-planned low-elevation reservoirs, designed to store water during exceptionally wet years, were considered all but useless and thus were never built.

Then, in 2016 and 2017, California received record snow and rainfall -- and the windfall of millions of acre-feet of runoff was mostly let out to sea. Nothing since has been learned."

California has again been experiencing rain and cold that could approach seasonal records. The state has been soaked by some 18 trillion gallons of rain in February alone. With still no effort to expand California's water-storage capacity, millions of acre-feet of runoff are once again cascading out to sea (and may be sorely missed next year).

townhall.com

#79 | Posted by nullifidian at 2019-05-21 02:57 PM | Reply

en.wikipedia.org

I found this after more research.

If India can lead in this, so can we. But of course, the U.S. outlaws it in some areas..

In the United States, until 2009 in Colorado, water rights laws almost completely restricted rainwater harvesting; a property owner who captured rainwater was deemed to be stealing it from those who have rights to take water from the watershed. Now, residential well owners who meet certain criteria may obtain a permit to install a rooftop precipitation collection system (SB 09-080).[25] Up to 10 large scale pilot studies may also be permitted (HB 09-1129).[26] The main factor in persuading the Colorado Legislature to change the law was a 2007 study that found that in an average year, 97% of the precipitation that fell in Douglas County, in the southern suburbs of Denver, never reached a stream -- it was used by plants or evaporated on the ground. Rainwater catchment is mandatory for new dwellings in Santa Fe, New Mexico.[27] Texas offers a sales tax exemption on the purchase of rainwater harvesting equipment. Both Texas[28] and Ohio allow the practice even for potable purposes. Oklahoma passed the Water for 2060 Act in 2012, to promote pilot projects for rainwater and graywater use among other water-saving techniques.[29]

#80 | Posted by boaz at 2019-05-21 02:59 PM | Reply

I never said it was easy.

we should be able to just flip some switches and move water

#78 | POSTED BY BOAZ

???

#81 | Posted by Derek_Wildstar at 2019-05-21 03:04 PM | Reply

#81,

Know how they open and close dams in modern control rooms? Well, it should be that easy with a national piping system to transfer water from one area to another using large pipes around the nation.

#82 | Posted by boaz at 2019-05-21 03:45 PM | Reply

"If you get virtually no rain for six months of the year and a ton of rain the other half of the year, is it surprising that in any given month the level is off from the average?"

I'm pretty sure the National Weather Service thought of that, otherwise their predictions would be pretty damn useless.

As in, the headline says "normal monthly rainfall" not "normal annual rainfall divided by twelve."

#83 | Posted by snoofy at 2019-05-21 04:08 PM | Reply

#82: In one fell swoop Boaz disregards almost a hundred years of California political history and the (ongoing) water wars between California and much of the rest of the West. Let me give you a grossly simplified way of better understanding: watch the movie Chinatown.

#84 | Posted by moder8 at 2019-05-21 04:22 PM | Reply

#82 Boaz, my former employer of 23 years deals in water delivery on a large scale in SoCal, specifically from the Colorado River. So many entities have an interest in that source alone, it is a nightmare of legal machinations. Water rights issues are so problematic, any idea like yours (which is "practical" amongst us mortals), is a non-starter. If you're talking about, say, bringing Mississippi River water to the Southwest, it would undoubtedly be a logistical nightmare that makes California's bullet train look like a garden hose installation in comparison.

#85 | Posted by Karabekian at 2019-05-21 04:25 PM | Reply

84 Moder8 - EXCELLENT example.

#86 | Posted by Karabekian at 2019-05-21 04:27 PM | Reply

I might add that a significant issue with Colorado River water is an international one, since Mexico is also a player - and a player that is pretty tired of getting the ------ end of the stick.

#87 | Posted by Karabekian at 2019-05-21 04:30 PM | Reply

"Let me give you a grossly simplified way of better understanding: watch the movie Chinatown."

They won't get past the name "Polanski" in the opening credits. :)

#88 | Posted by snoofy at 2019-05-21 04:33 PM | Reply

STFU sniper,

collecting rain water is easy storing it is hard.

#89 | Posted by Tor at 2019-05-21 07:21 PM | Reply

Article from 2 years ago:

Every 200 years California suffers a storm of biblical proportions -- this year's rains are just a precursor

California has seen worse: massive floods have swept through the state about every 200 years for the past 2,000 years or more, climate scientists Michael Dettinger and Lynn Ingram recount in a 2013 article.

More than 150 years have passed since California's last, great flood -- and a team of researchers with the US Geological Survey have predicted what kind of damage a similar flood would cause today. Although the simulation didn't include a body count, Dettinger and Ingram predicted that thousands of people would probably die

#90 | Posted by sentinel at 2019-05-21 08:47 PM | Reply

If you're talking about, say, bringing Mississippi River water to the Southwest, it would undoubtedly be a logistical nightmare that makes California's bullet train look like a garden hose installation in comparison.

It would be huge, but it could be done if planned correctly. Imagine flooding reduced in New Orleans, that when it does start to flood, the water is diverted to California during the hot months when there's no rain or the water table is filled back up with excess water from rainy areas.

It can be done.

#91 | Posted by boaz at 2019-05-21 11:06 PM | Reply

"the water is diverted to California"

Good luck with your 2,000 mile long tunnel!

#92 | Posted by snoofy at 2019-05-22 12:05 AM | Reply

Good luck with your 2,000 mile long tunnel!

Exactly!

But it can be done. That's the type of big thinking we need.

#93 | Posted by boaz at 2019-05-22 07:47 AM | Reply

Imagine flooding reduced in New Orleans, that when it does start to flood, the water is diverted to California

How much of that flood water is salty or brackish? My understanding is that large-scale desalinization is cost-prohibitive.

#94 | Posted by JOE at 2019-05-22 08:24 AM | Reply

How much of that flood water is salty or brackish?

I would say most of it is rain water. But that's why we have desalination.

#95 | Posted by boaz at 2019-05-22 08:42 AM | Reply

Wow Boaz seems to have done a 180 on government intervention
Shouldn't each individual Californian be responsible for their own water collection?
Why should my tax dollars go to them?

#96 | Posted by truthhurts at 2019-05-22 09:07 AM | Reply

Doesn't socal water already come from someplace that has water?
Not sure what Boaz is recommending that is different
I guess Boaz isn't aware of the water insecurity in the mid west
Also ironic is a conservative arguing for collective resource management
Isn't that socialism? What is different from the resource management actions like requiring developers to clean their runoff or face fines? Like was recently passed in nj

#97 | Posted by truthhurts at 2019-05-22 09:12 AM | Reply

--Shouldn't each individual Californian be responsible for their own water collection?

I agree. We should have been spending tax money on reservoirs rather than stupid shht like the Moonbeam Express during the last 10 years.

#98 | Posted by nullifidian at 2019-05-22 09:17 AM | Reply

@98
Ummmmmmm
Ugh
Ok you see each individual and reservoir are mutually exclusive ?
Argh
Oh wait I get it now each individual should build their own reservoir
Ummmmmmmm

#99 | Posted by truthhurts at 2019-05-22 09:23 AM | Reply

Doesn't socal water already come from someplace that has water?
Not sure what Boaz is recommending that is different
I guess Boaz isn't aware of the water insecurity in the mid west

Boazo is not aware of many things.

We have the California aquaduct.

The Governor Edmund G. Brown California Aqueduct is a system of canals, tunnels, and pipelines that conveys water collected from the Sierra Nevada Mountains and valleys of Northern and Central California to Southern California.
Construction started: 1963
Total length: Total: 444 mi (715 km); Main: 304 mi (489 km); East Branch: 140 mi (230 km)

Wikipedia

The water wars have been raging off and on since Los Angeles expanded during the late 19th century.

Gov. Jerry Brown already has plans for a gargantuan set of tunnels to move water under the Delta to Central Valley farms and to Southern California cities. He says the $20 billion project would help endangered fish and ensure a more reliable water supply, but opponents like boazo and nullo question it.

Trumpsters just stay out of it. Trump and his Idiocracy would only make things worse as he always does when he gets involved. It would be helpful if Humpy would just shut his chocolate pie hole and pay his frickin bills. The Federal Government owes Ca a boatload of money.

Hey Boazo. Stop trying to help Californians. We do not need your kind of "help". Just pay Ca what is owed to us and we will be fine.

#100 | Posted by donnerboy at 2019-05-22 09:37 AM | Reply

Comments are closed for this entry.

Home | Breaking News | Comments | User Blogs | Stats | Back Page | RSS Feed | RSS Spec | DMCA Compliance | Privacy | Copyright 2019 World Readable

Drudge Retort