Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Saturday, March 16, 2019

We do not treat all hate crimes equally. For decades, we have been understandably focused on attacks by Muslim extremists. I say understandably because 9/11 was the worst terrorist attack ever, and it was only a prelude of the horrors to come.

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From the linked article:

But a focus on Islamist violence should not distract us from the growing threat of right-wing violence. While 9/11 is the deadliest terrorist attack in U.S. history, the second-worst was Timothy McVeigh's 1995 bombing of the Oklahoma City federal building, which killed 168 people. The Anti-Defamation League reports that in the United States, "right-wing extremists collectively have been responsible for more than 70 percent of the 427 extremist-related killings over the past 10 years, far outnumbering those committed by left-wing extremists or domestic Islamist extremists." The toll of right-wing terrorism could have been even greater if the FBI had not apprehended last month the heavily armed Coast Guard lieutenant Christopher Hasson before he was allegedly ready to strike against liberal politicians and media personalities. Yet the administration has slashed programs designed to combat this menace.

#1 | Posted by Hans at 2019-03-15 08:52 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

In addition

The alleged Christchurch shooter's loathsome manifesto is called "The Great Replacement," a common trope of white supremacists. He complained of "mass immigration" and "higher fertility rates of the immigrants" leading to "the complete racial and cultural replacement of the European people." As specific motivations for the attack, he cited the death of a little girl in Sweden in a 2017 Islamic State-inspired truck attack, the defeat of Marine Le Pen in the 2017 French election and the presence in France of "invaders," meaning Muslim immigrants. Among his incoherent list of objectives, he expressed a desire to spark "a civil war that will eventually balkanize the US along political, cultural and, most importantly, racial lines."

Does any of this sound familiar? It should. Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa) has spoken of his own fears of the "great replacement." Stephen K. Bannon, President Trump's former counselor, has voiced admiration for a racist French novel called "The Camp of the Saints" that imagines France being overrun by nonwhite newcomers. Trump himself has expressed support for Le Pen; said "Islam hates us"; praised white supremacists as "very fine people"; and warned of an "invasion" of undocumented immigrants.

Indeed on Thursday, the White House posted a grainy surveillance video showing undocumented immigrants, small children among them, crossing into the United States under the blaring headline, "This is a national emergency." The day before, Breitbart published an interview in which Trump appeared to threaten violence against left-wing critics, saying, "I have the support of the police, the support of the military, the support of the Bikers for Trump -- I have the tough people, but they don't play it tough -- until they go to a certain point, and then it would be very bad, very bad."

#2 | Posted by Hans at 2019-03-15 08:53 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

But here is the most important part of this article:

Trump is not responsible for what happened in Christchurch or Pittsburgh, any more than Saudi leaders who have spread Salafism across the Muslim world are responsible for specific terrorist attacks. But Trump has promoted bigotry from the most powerful bully pulpit in the world. He has balkanized the United States and fomented intolerance. It is well past time for the president to accept responsibility for his rhetoric and to tone it down. Because the wrong words can inspire the worst acts.
Bottom line: "But Trump has promoted bigotry from the most powerful bully pulpit in the world."

Not difficult to understand at all.

BTW, Max Boot, like Rick Wilson, doesn't suffer from "TDS."

#3 | Posted by Hans at 2019-03-15 08:58 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 4

Fat Nixon was asked if "White Nationalism" was becoming a problem in the world.

"No. I don't think so."

Of course he doesn't. Those are his fanboys.

#4 | Posted by Nixon at 2019-03-16 08:58 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

The alleged Christchurch shooter's loathsome manifesto

That should be ‘MAGAtfesto' in honor of the------------------- who inspired Tarrant.

#5 | Posted by Reinheitsgebot at 2019-03-16 12:25 PM | Reply

Max Boot knows more about Terrorism Islamic and otherwise than everyone in Trump's entire family.

#6 | Posted by Tor at 2019-03-16 03:56 PM | Reply

...praised white supremacists as "very fine people"...#2 | Posted by Hans at 2019-03-15 08:53 PM
Damn, I hate it when people sprinkle lies into their otherwise valid and interesting points. It really is a shame that the author won't accept that the truth is sufficient without feeling the need to replay that played out lie.

"And you had people, and I'm not talking about the neo-Nazis and the white nationalists, because they should be condemned totally. But you had many people in that group other than neo-Nazis and white nationalists. OK? And the press has treated them absolutely unfairly. Now, in the other group also, you had some fine people, but you also had troublemakers and you see them come with the black outfits and with the helmets and with the baseball bats. You've got -- you had a lot of bad -- you had a lot of bad people in the other group ... "

#7 | Posted by Avigdore at 2019-03-16 04:56 PM | Reply

"And you had people, and I'm not talking about the neo-Nazis and the white nationalists, because they should be condemned totally. But you had many people in that group other than neo-Nazis and white nationalists. OK?"

Not OK.

Because that's a lie too.

Everybody in that group was a white nationalist and a Neo-Nazi.

#8 | Posted by snoofy at 2019-03-16 05:38 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Part of the distinction likely lies in the fact that Islamic terrorism is a threat to everyone, particularly other Muslims.

Killing 49 people is terrible. But it's far different than what the Islamic State has done...capturing a territory the size of the UK, and enslaving or killing everyone in that territory who might pose a threat or disagree with their methods. Typically other Muslims.

#9 | Posted by madbomber at 2019-03-16 07:42 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

"Killing 49 people is terrible. But it's far different than what the Islamic State has done"

Or the American-led invasion of Iraq, which killed hundreds of thousands of innocents, injured hundreds of thousands more, and displaced millions, causing the void that ISIS, a predictable reaction to the complete destruction of Iraq, eventually tried to fill. No Iraq, no Libya, no Syria-- no spilling over of refugees, scarred by death and war and oppression and loss, into western lands.

#10 | Posted by NerfHerder at 2019-03-16 08:35 PM | Reply

By the way, Max Boot is a neocon and late to the white supremacist bashing party. He is still trying to wash the blood off his hands from supporting his beloved military adventure in Iraq. The blowback of his demented "manifest-destiny" interventionist foreign policy is one of the reasons we have a ------ like Trump in the White House in the first place. He may be jumping on the bandwagon here and trying to gain some legitimacy from the other side, and he is good at writing all the words that people want to hear, but in my mind, he can still go ---- himself.

#11 | Posted by NerfHerder at 2019-03-16 08:40 PM | Reply

#9, you could call it that, or you could say its local people fighting for their way of life, against a vastly superior invading army that is determined to control their oil. You could also say we created these monsters by eradicating other monsters and created a power vacuum into which endless chaos and war developed. Its a pattern that has followed every major US military action since WWII.

Those ISIS fighters are a cruel primitive lot, but hardly anything worse than our own ancestors from medieval Europe that created the most horrific torture technology known to mankind, all so that they could have all the money and power for themselves. Damned human beings anyway.

#12 | Posted by bayviking at 2019-03-16 08:43 PM | Reply

Part of the distinction likely lies in the fact that Islamic terrorism is a threat to everyone, particularly other Muslims.

Killing 49 people is terrible. But it's far different than what the Islamic State has done...capturing a territory the size of the UK, and enslaving or killing everyone in that territory who might pose a threat or disagree with their methods. Typically other Muslims.

#9 | Posted by madbomber

This isn't a binary issue.

Stop apologizing for terrorists.

#13 | Posted by jpw at 2019-03-16 10:47 PM | Reply

Just another article trying to re-frame the conversation about terrorism.

#14 | Posted by BillJohnson at 2019-03-16 11:27 PM | Reply

Just another article trying to re-frame the conversation about terrorism.

#14 | Posted by BillJohnson

Another faux Christian trying to avoid a conversation about their sham religion.

#15 | Posted by jpw at 2019-03-16 11:40 PM | Reply

Uhh, Max Boot is a terrorist...

#16 | Posted by Ben_Berkkake at 2019-03-17 01:05 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

= the Islamic State

People who "think" the Islamic State is all Muslims are the kind of people who open fire in a random Mosque somewhere.

#17 | Posted by Corky at 2019-03-17 02:00 AM | Reply

JPW,

"Another faux Christian trying to avoid a conversation about their sham religion."

Are all religions "sham" or just Christianity?

#18 | Posted by billjohnson at 2019-03-17 09:06 AM | Reply

JPW,

btw...what does this crime have to do with Christianity anyway?

What does that have to do with it?

Again...just trying to re-frame the conversation.

#19 | Posted by BillJohnson at 2019-03-17 09:13 AM | Reply

#18 all are shams.

The reason why your posts are ridiculous is that you seem to be operating under the impression that alt-right extremism should be dealt with until you consider it as big a threat as Islamic extremism.

I'm simply saying you can discuss and address both.

#20 | Posted by jpw at 2019-03-17 11:30 AM | Reply

"You could also say we created these monsters by eradicating other monsters and created a power vacuum into which endless chaos and war developed. Its a pattern that has followed every major US military action since WWII."

Totally agree. What the average American did not understand is that the brutal, anti-democratic dictators that the west was so eager to overthrow were the only thing keeping the lid on the Pandora's Box containing the elements that led to the emergence of ISIS as a regional force to be reckoned with. Hopefully we've learned our lesson. At the very least we should leave Assad alone, if not offer him some level of support.

"Stop apologizing for terrorists."

I'm not. Occasionally, terrorists get their ---- together and become something more formidable, such as in the case of ISIS.. Fortunately, most terrorists are simply deranged losers with little ability to make a long-term impact on society writ large. Such as the case here.

#21 | Posted by madbomber at 2019-03-17 12:56 PM | Reply

"People who "think" the Islamic State is all Muslims are the kind of people who open fire in a random Mosque somewhere."

The Islamic State practices Islam in it's purest form, striving to get as close to the form practiced by Mohammed as possible.

You're right, the vast majority of Muslims have no interest in the violence associated with Islam, but you can't really call those who do un-Islamic without also saying that the prophet himself was un-Islamic.

#22 | Posted by madbomber at 2019-03-17 01:05 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

"The reason why your posts are ridiculous is that you seem to be operating under the impression that alt-right extremism should be dealt with until you consider it as big a threat as Islamic extremism."

We bombed the ---- out of the Islamic State on a daily basis. It was justified because they had been declared a hostile force by the US government. Even then, there were legal discussions as to whether or not ISIS was best dealt with through military force, or treated as criminal non-combatants.

I don't think we're to the point where we can legally bomb white supremacists. But, if they were to get their ---- together and start taking over territory, I would have no compunction about the government treating them in the same manner that ISIS or Al Quaeda have been treated.

#23 | Posted by madbomber at 2019-03-17 01:08 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

- The Islamic State practices Islam in it's purest form

Total horse sh... manure.

"Nonetheless, it is misleading to focus on the religion of ISIS; it implies that the group is organized around some well-worked-out theological system that most of ISIS' members subscribe to, having joined the organization for primarily religious purposes. There is absolutely no evidence to substantiate these premises.

Most ISIS members are indigenous Iraqis and Syrians. This is significant; Al-Baghdadi's belief system is heavily inspired by Salafism, a movement only endorsed by a small minority of Sunnis and concentrated mostly in the Persian Gulf and North Africa."

mepc.org

"The distortion of Islam that drives terrorism"

www.washingtonpost.com

#24 | Posted by Corky at 2019-03-17 01:37 PM | Reply

"Total horse sh... manure."

How so?

The Islamic State literally practices a form of Islam that is closest to that practiced by Mohammed.

"Most ISIS members are indigenous Iraqis and Syrians. This is significant; Al-Baghdadi's belief system is heavily inspired by Salafism, a movement only endorsed by a small minority of Sunnis and concentrated mostly in the Persian Gulf and North Africa."

As typical Americans, we view ourselves as being supremely important, even when it comes to being an enemy. In reality, the Anbar Sunnis that made up the core of ISIS were driven primarily by their hatred for Shia Muslims, whom they viewed as apostates. They also despised the Yazidi and Druze populations for the same reasons. But they were pretty easy (relatively speaking) on Christians. Why? Because Mohammed had been easy on Christians (and Jews), once they had been subjugated.

Here is a very good article on ISIS, referred to me by one of our legal advisors while I was overseas. The legal team thought it was important...so maybe you should give it a shot as well.

#25 | Posted by madbomber at 2019-03-17 06:08 PM | Reply

Literally, they do not, as both articles I posted document thoroughly.

It's like saying that Jim Jones literally practiced a form of Christianity that is closest to that practiced by Paul.

It's absurd, and only meant to feed your bias.

#26 | Posted by Corky at 2019-03-18 11:58 AM | Reply

"It's like saying that Jim Jones literally practiced a form of Christianity that is closest to that practiced by Paul."

Did he? If he did, then it's a valid comparison. And for Muslims, Mohammed is the model Muslim who did no wrong. And you can't really criticize other Muslims for doing things that Mohammed did.

#27 | Posted by madbomber at 2019-03-18 08:51 PM | Reply

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