Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Friday, December 07, 2018

A Fort Bragg Green Beret soldier who fought for our country is now fighting cancer and the government. Sgt. First Class Richard Stayskal has stage four lung cancer and it's a diagnosis he says should have been caught earlier but was missed by military doctors. "I went six months without being treated, six months of nothing being done to me a tumor just growing," he told ABC11.

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For a horror story of what a different soldier lived through, there is a top-voted /R/Army post detailing how badly a medical procedure can go: www.reddit.com

22 a day; be good to one another and check in on your battles.

#1 | Posted by GOnoles92 at 2018-12-07 02:00 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

While it's nowhere near as bad what happened to this guy, navy dentists totally mess up my teeth while I was in the Marine Corps. It cost me thousands of dollars to fix what was done when I got out and went to a competent dentist.

#2 | Posted by qcp at 2018-12-07 02:08 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

"22 a day"

Thanks, Second Amendment!

And thanks, GOP Congress, for making it illegal for VA doctors to ask suicidal veterans if they have a gun at home!

Try not to let your little heart bleed out all at once, GoNoles.

#3 | Posted by snoofy at 2018-12-07 02:18 PM | Reply

#3 | Posted by snoofy

Doesn't change the Feres Doctrine, which was ruled by the Supreme Court in the 1950s.

#4 | Posted by GOnoles92 at 2018-12-07 02:19 PM | Reply

sucks to be a government employee

unless you get elected to congress

#5 | Posted by ChiefTutMoses at 2018-12-07 02:23 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

i used to link, from my suing the Army page, a petition against Feres.
Feres wouldn't have saved this guy (or me), just allowed to sue for damages afterwards.

#6 | Posted by ichiro at 2018-12-07 06:41 PM | Reply

Care to share your story Ichiro? If I knew it, I forgot.

#7 | Posted by snoofy at 2018-12-07 06:52 PM | Reply

It is a good thing civilian doctors never make mistakes...

Also, they knew what they signed up for.

#8 | Posted by bored at 2018-12-07 08:20 PM | Reply

This sucks but it can happen in any medical facility. I always got quality care when I was sick. They Doctors aren't flunkies who didn't get proper training. They go to the best civilian schools in the country.

#9 | Posted by byrdman at 2018-12-08 12:09 AM | Reply

#7 it's not medical, per se. i was not in during any conflict or war. it's a false positive drug testing, clearing my record, story ... took most of my adult life. lawyers wouldn't help.
i have a link ... because i digitized every document and put it online with some amount of narrative around each linked document, there are MANY.
still want to see it? wtf...
ichisama.com

i'm still somewhat protective of the story. the stigma persist... and multiplied because... well... i didn't handle it well, i became IT, more or less than zero.

#10 | Posted by ichiro at 2018-12-08 12:28 AM | Reply

Misdiagnosis could affect 12M U.S. adults annually, study finds
www.modernhealthcare.com

An estimated 1 in 20 U.S. adults could be misdiagnosed during outpatient visits, and about half of those errors could prove to be harmful for the patient, finds a new study in the journal BMJ Quality and Safety.

Misdiagnoses remain a major problem, healthcare quality and safety experts say, one that is often overlooked and underfunded.

The reasons for the high numbers of "missed opportunities" are multifaceted, experts who spoke with Modern Healthcare explained. They cited concerns around various items within the healthcare setting, like the structure of outpatient systems, cognitive biases and unclear clinical guidelines. It will take more than one approach to make improvements.

"This is a hidden problem," said Dr. David Newman-Toker, director of initiatives for diagnostic safety and quality with the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality at Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore. He agreed with the authors, who said the study's limitations may mean the numbers of misdiagnoses might be underreported.

Efforts to measure and reduce diagnostic errors should be a bigger focus for policymakers, healthcare organizations and researchers, the authors of the new report conclude. The difficulty, Singh said, is that it takes multiple factors working together to make the improvements.


Underfunded means Congress, and it's Congress who has to have the intestinal fortitude to bring all the healthcare players together by legislating a system-oriented approach that fixes this problem.

And, just as a reminder for everyone, healthcare lobbyists pay FOUR TIMES more in lobbying than the MIC lobbyists to get their way with Congress.

#11 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2018-12-08 08:28 AM | Reply

20 percent of patients with serious conditions are first misdiagnosed, study says
www.washingtonpost.com

More than 20 percent of patients who sought a second opinion at one of the nation's premier medical institutions had been misdiagnosed by their primary care providers, according to new research published Tuesday.

Twelve percent of the people who asked specialists at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., to review their cases had received correct diagnoses, the study found. The rest were given diagnoses that were partly in line with the conclusions of the Mayo doctors who evaluated their conditions.

The results are generally similar to other research on diagnostic error but provide additional evidence for advocates who say such findings show that the health-care system still has room for improvement.

"Diagnosis is extremely hard," said Mark L. Graber, a senior fellow at the research institute RTI International and founder of the Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine. "There are 10,000 diseases and only 200 to 300 symptoms."

In 2015, the National Academy of Medicine reported that most people will receive an incorrect or late diagnosis at least once in their lives, sometimes with serious consequences.

It cited one estimate that 12 million people -- about 5 percent of adults who seek outpatient care -- are misdiagnosed annually. The report also noted that diagnostic error is a relatively under-measured and understudied aspect of patient safety.

According to previous research cited in the new study, diagnostic errors "contribute to approximately 10 percent of patient deaths" and "account for 6 to 17 percent of adverse events in hospitals." Graber estimates that the rate of misdiagnosis, although difficult to determine, occurs in 10 percent to 20 percent of cases.

"Diagnostic error is an area where we need more research, more study and more information," said James M. Naessens, a professor of health services research at the Mayo Clinic, who led its study.


All this medical complexity should scare the hell out of every American.

And this should also be a reminder that all the ridiculous time and effort in arguing against Obamacare was nothing more than a shameful exercise in American-style greed, corruption, fear mongering, and Congressional legislative obstinance that is all the more outrageous if regular Americans knew and understood the meaning of these sorts of healthcare studies.

#12 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2018-12-08 08:41 AM | Reply

I always got quality care when I was sick. They Doctors aren't flunkies who didn't get proper training. They go to the best civilian schools in the country.

#9 | POSTED BY BYRDMAN

It's good that you like your doctor, and you are correct in that doctors "aren't flunkies" ... but you're kidding yourself if you think your doctor doesn't make mistakes.

In America, doctors get their medical decisions right only 55% of the time ... www.rand.org

In fact, doctors base their clinical decisions on evidence-based medicine and science only 20% of the time ... www.scientificamerican.com

One-third of all healthcare spent in the United States is waste with no benefit to patients ... www.theatlantic.com

I would like to think that you supported Obamacare, because in supporting the ACA meant that once the overwhelmingly majority of Americans had access to a primary care doctor (and the pre-requisite EMR, aka electronic medical record), the next step was to start tackling these healthcare quality problems (like misdiagnosis) that can ONLY be made possible by operationalizing the data from EMRs thru legislation.

#13 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2018-12-08 09:54 AM | Reply

#1, its amazing that soldier survived his doctors, who do not understand, "first do no harm".

#14 | Posted by bayviking at 2018-12-08 10:20 AM | Reply

PINCH for Congress! I'm serious about that.

#15 | Posted by danni at 2018-12-08 10:26 AM | Reply

PINCH for Congress! I'm serious about that.

#15 | POSTED BY DANNI

I promise to not let your kind compliment go to my head ;-)

The scientific american link in post # 13 is from the book 'Demand Better! Revive Our Broken Healthcare System' by doctors Sanjaya Kumar and David B. Nash -- it's a book I highly recommend to everyone wanting to truly understand healthcare and medicine, and learn why there is a lack of science behind medical decisions.

Also from the book, on page 123, is a nice, concise, boiled down, three questions to always ask your doctor ...

1. What else can it be?
2. Could two things be going on to explain my problem?
3. Is there anything else in my history or physical exam or lab tests that seem to be at odds with the working diagnosis?

These three questions to ask are per Jerome Groopman, MD ... who call these questions a "broad spectrum antibiotic" to help support physician diagnostic thinking and guard against the doctor's cognitive traps.

#16 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2018-12-08 11:46 AM | Reply

The authors of 'Demand Better! Revive our Broke Healthcare System', Dr. Kumar and Dr. Nash ...

www.youtube.com

www.youtube.com

www.scientificamerican.com

Knowledge is for everyone, people -- now get busy with it!

#17 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2018-12-08 11:54 AM | Reply

My father died from the effects of agent orange... the government told him his scared up face was from some sort of jungle fungus...

Remember what happened to Ukrainian president Victor Yushchenko when he was poisoned with dioxin?

c1.staticflickr.com

At the hands of the US gov that happened to my father... along with countless others. His and their conditions were left untreated... attributed to some "unknown"... so he went blind, the soles of his feet the palms of his hands would grow thick crack and peel off

I hope the hell this lawsuit opens a HUGE can of worms and exposes the complicity of the military.

#18 | Posted by RightisTrite at 2018-12-08 11:55 AM | Reply

Soldiers are nothing more than laboratory rats with weapons. The foreign battlefield is a laboratory, and so is the homeland when they come back.

#19 | Posted by NerfHerder at 2018-12-08 12:07 PM | Reply

At the hands of the US gov that happened to my father... along with countless others. His and their conditions were left untreated... attributed to some "unknown"... so he went blind, the soles of his feet the palms of his hands would grow thick crack and peel off

I hope the hell this lawsuit opens a HUGE can of worms and exposes the complicity of the military.

#18 | POSTED BY RIGHTISTRITE

I'm sorry about your Dad.

We as a country knew the problems from agent orange and it's effects going back to the late 1970s. In fact, the old TV show Barney Miller had a great episode about it that aired in 1980 ... www.dailymotion.com

When we want to blame the government, and I certainly am in the line of blaming government (and I work for the VA) ...

But casting blame really needs mean blaming Congress, who can legislate the necessary solutions whether it's Veterans Affairs by simplifying the benefits process and strengthening VA healthcare, and by bringing all the disparate healthcare players together and legislating regulatory efforts and funding aimed at fixing the problems of US healthcare as a whole -- only Congress can cut thru all the BS and red tape, if they really wanted to.

Again, healthcare lobbyists throw around FOUR TIMES the amount of money to get their way, as compared to their defense lobbyist counterparts who keep the military-industrial-complex in place -- that pretty much explains why US healthcare is so dysfunctional and crappy and why Congress can't get it's act together.

#20 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2018-12-08 12:19 PM | Reply

In America, doctors get their medical decisions right only 55% of the time ...

Did you read the study you linked to?

The conclusion was that patients were not receiving care they needed, not that the diagnosis was wrong:

"Patients failed to receive recommended care approximately 46 percent of the time, compared with 11 percent of the time when they received care that was not recommended and potentially harmful. Overall, patients received 55 percent of recommended care."

I wonder how carefully you vetted the rest of your "research" given you didn't even get the premise or conclusion right on this one.

#21 | Posted by zarnon at 2018-12-08 02:53 PM | Reply

Did you read the study you linked to?

The conclusion was that patients were not receiving care they needed, not that the diagnosis was wrong:

"Patients failed to receive recommended care approximately 46 percent of the time, compared with 11 percent of the time when they received care that was not recommended and potentially harmful. Overall, patients received 55 percent of recommended care."

I wonder how carefully you vetted the rest of your "research" given you didn't even get the premise or conclusion right on this one.

#21 | POSTED BY ZARNON

Wrong

The sum total of the bad parts is what equals poor healthcare in America.

The 2003 RAND Study about doctors getting their clinical decisions right only 55% of the time is just one part of it -- doctors misdiagnosing patients is another part.

My point is that there are NO short, distilled, bumper sticker sized explanations to any of the problems plaguing US healthcare ... from misdiagnosis, to poor clinical decision making, to 30% of everything done in healthcare is waste with no benefit to patients, to medical error being the 3rd leading cause of death in America ...

The one overreaching explanation and root cause to this gigantic $3 trillion a year mess is that doctors basically practice medicine in 2018 the same why doctors practiced medicine 150 years ago -- and the medical school curriculum is still light years behind in training doctors in the manner spelled out by the Institute of Medicine's 'To Err is Human' and 'Crossing the Quality Chasm'.

If you don't believe me, here are some lectures that will explain it all to you ...

Dr. Ken Kizer, Director, Institute for Population Health Improvement
vimeo.com
[7:53]

Dr. Ken Kizer: Health Care Consumerism and Health Information Technology
www.youtube.com
[48:56]

Kenneth W. Kizer, MD, former Under Secretary for Health at the VA, Speaking at Meaningful Use NOW
www.youtube.com
[38:57]

Dr. David B. Nash: 3 Connect Ourselves and Our Communities Full Presentation
www.youtube.com
[1:41:32]

Dr. David B. Nash: 3 Connect Ourselves and Our Communities - Q and A
www.youtube.com
[21:02]

The above lectures should keep you busy for awhile. Once you're done digesting all the content, get back to me and we'll talk.

#22 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2018-12-08 03:32 PM | Reply

1/12/18
Patient:
My problem is this: my body is changing as I grow older feels at times as though it cannot quite keep up with my life stressors. My nerves become jittery, unrestful, and I would like to try something like Klonopin to see if it might ease that occurrence.

I have had Klonopin before as a student (1999), but I didn't give it much chance/use. I'd like to try it again.

If you are amicable to such a trial, please advise.

1/12/18
Dr:
As far as Klonopin is concerned, .... Furthermore, it is a controlled substance that by VA policy, it is no longer available. You may choose to see a civilian physician that can prescribe it to you.

1/19/18
Patient:
Seriously, the VA doesn't give anybody control substances ... or just Klonopin? I bet I can find a bunch of Vets getting Klonopin or some, or many, other Benzodiazepines.

1/22/18
Dr:
Yes, you will find thousands of vets on controlled substances, Klonopin just being one of them. They are all being weaned off as directed by the Federal government. The FDA to be exact.

Your frustration and anger or understandable.

2/21/18
Patient:
What law/reg/policy forbids you prescribing Klonopin? Specifically, I mean, so I can look it up and read it myself.

2/28/18
Dr:
PDR.

2/28/18
Patient:
What page?

2/28/18
Patient:
At our first appointment you said "I'm just the pill pusher."

What drugs will you prescribe for me for nearly overwhelming anxiety and it's related issues, like sleep, and phobias?

How about Valium or Xanax, would you prescribe those or are those also forbidden by PDR?

3/1/18 10:32am
Dr:
don't know.

3/1/18 10:45am
Dr:
Please schedule an appointment like all we vets have to do it.
You're now harassing me with your disrespectful and endless secure messages. I would appreciate you find something more productive to do with your time. You have been reported to the proper authorities with the Disciplinary Committee here at the VA. There will be consequences. Please, enough.

#23 | Posted by ichiro at 2018-12-08 07:21 PM | Reply

I am generally critical of the VA, having been misdiagnosed a couple of times leaving me to be ill for more than a year, but let us be fair. The medical care at the VA is a little above average. Thousands of people a year die in hospitals from medical mistakes, misdiagnoses, and infections that occur due to exposure in the hospital. Medical care kills about 40,000 people a year. That is more than gun violence.

#24 | Posted by docnjo at 2018-12-09 11:50 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Thousands of people a year die in hospitals from medical mistakes, misdiagnoses, and infections that occur due to exposure in the hospital.

Very true. Even a star athlete such as Alex Smith, going to the best medical provider available to him as an athlete, had a post-surgery infection on his leg. No one is safe.

#25 | Posted by GOnoles92 at 2018-12-09 11:56 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

I am generally critical of the VA, having been misdiagnosed a couple of times leaving me to be ill for more than a year, but let us be fair. The medical care at the VA is a little above average. Thousands of people a year die in hospitals from medical mistakes, misdiagnoses, and infections that occur due to exposure in the hospital. Medical care kills about 40,000 people a year. That is more than gun violence.

#24 | POSTED BY DOCNJO

That is a really good post -- and from someone who works in VHA it is appreciated.

My only quibble is that the experts say that ~ 250,000 people die annually from medical error ...

Study Suggests Medical Errors Now Third Leading Cause of Death in the U.S.
www.hopkinsmedicine.org

#26 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2018-12-09 12:21 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

wait... medical ERROR is THIRD leading cause of death in US?!
that's reason enough to stay home, right there.

#27 | Posted by ichiro at 2018-12-09 04:30 PM | Reply

i just went said get this off my face. they blew it up and cut it off.
i didn't say to biospy anything, just to get rid of it. this was fully authorized.
2 weeks later i get a call saying to report to a surgeon for Mohs surgery on a squamous cell carcinoma (near my lip), that the biop was positive for this, new to me, thing.
wtf? bitch left some in there, too.
i don't believe any of this ----. i got enough "damage."

#28 | Posted by ichiro at 2018-12-09 04:36 PM | Reply

#26 | Posted by PinchALoaf An error is giving the wrong dosage or drug as prescribed. That does not count misdiagnoses, infections or negligence.

#29 | Posted by docnjo at 2018-12-09 05:43 PM | Reply

#26 | Posted by PinchALoaf An error is giving the wrong dosage or drug as prescribed. That does not count misdiagnoses, infections or negligence.

#29 | POSTED BY DOCNJO

Well, you're wrong -- no offense.

They're all errors, don't over think it.

#30 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2018-12-09 05:54 PM | Reply

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