Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Tuesday, August 21, 2018

They are going to be late, because they can't read the clock. According to the London Telegraph, some schools in the U.K. are removing analogue clocks, because teenagers are unable to tell the time. Malcolm Trobe, deputy general secretary at the Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL), told the Telegraph: "The current generation aren't as good at reading the traditional clock face as older generation."

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Yet these same kids are the ones who help their grandparents use a computer or a cellphone. Hell many can write code at 8.

This is just another attempt by an older, fading generation (myself included) to pretend that they are still superior to the younger generation.

"Crazy to think that some today don't even know how to use a telegraph machine!"

#1 | Posted by memyselfini at 2018-08-21 11:40 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

It's not difficult to learn how to read an analogue clock.

They're common enough that it seems an important lesson to teach.

#2 | Posted by ClownShack at 2018-08-21 12:05 PM | Reply

#2 | POSTED BY CLOWNSHACK

I don't disagree. But it's not surprising that some children are no longer exposed to analog clocks and are thus unfamiliar with them.

This is obviously a mocking piece.

The inability of the younger generation to read analog clocks will not be the demise of our civilization. The older generation's voting for current public officials and their current policies may very well be.

#3 | Posted by memyselfini at 2018-08-21 12:17 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

The inability of the younger generation to read analog clocks will not be the demise of our civilization.

True.

But. It takes less than ten minutes to teach someone how to use an analogue clock.

If the younger generation can't read analogue clocks, it's because no one took the time to teach them.

Also. Not sure how prevalent this is. Seems like it's currently limited to some schools in the UK.

#4 | Posted by ClownShack at 2018-08-21 12:22 PM | Reply

#2 I agree. It's like cursive writing that is no longer taught.

#5 | Posted by gracieamazed at 2018-08-21 12:23 PM | Reply

My grandchildren can't read a sun dial! OMG!

#6 | Posted by danni at 2018-08-21 12:29 PM | Reply

The inability of the younger generation to read and write without digital crutches will not be the demise of our civilization. It'll just become an idiocracy.

#7 | Posted by nullifidian at 2018-08-21 12:35 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

#5 | POSTED BY GRACIEAMAZED

And what is the importance in cursive?

If one's cursive is good, it's pretty. If one's cursive is bad, it's illegible. With varying degrees between the two, cursive is a obsolete from of communication.

I throw cursive into most proper etiquette groups. It was simply a way for the bourgeoisie to separate themselves from the savage commoners.

#8 | Posted by memyselfini at 2018-08-21 12:42 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 3

It'll just become an idiocracy.

#7 | POSTED BY NULLIFIDIAN

We're there already and you're the dear leader's "Walmart greeter".

#9 | Posted by memyselfini at 2018-08-21 12:45 PM | Reply | Funny: 1

They probably can't churn butter or shoe a horse either. Who gives a damn?

#10 | Posted by DirkStruan at 2018-08-21 12:46 PM | Reply

--And what is the importance in cursive?

If one's cursive is good, it's pretty. If one's cursive is bad, it's illegible. With varying degrees between the two, cursive is a obsolete from of communication...

...for people who can't write without a touchscreen and voice recognition. Writing creates a disciplined mind. You can't just backspace and use spell check. You have to compose your thoughts before putting pen to paper, or even using a typewriter and dealing with the hassle of using whiteout.

#11 | Posted by nullifidian at 2018-08-21 12:48 PM | Reply


@#2 ... It's not difficult to learn how to read an analogue clock. ...

There are two aspects in play here.

The first is, as you mention, learning how to read an analog clock. That is fairly easy to do.

imo, the second, and more important, aspect is being able to discern the time from an analog clock when you glance at it. That aspect requires repeated use of an analog clock.

The second aspect is why digital speedometers quickly fell out of fashion on cars - they have to be read. You have to look at them and actually read the digits.

Whereas an analog speedometer, you get an idea of how fast you are going just by glancing at the dial. For example, I know the speedometer on my car displays 55mph when the pointer is vertical. If you want a more precise reading, you spend more time and read the details of the pointer and the dial.

Ditto for analog clocks. If you just want an approximate time, a quick glance will get that for you. However, if you need precision to the second (presuming there is a second hand) then you take more time to read the extra precision.

For a while the vaunted HP test equipment division (now Agilent) used to use an analog clock look-a-like to display data that an instrument gathered over time.

#12 | Posted by LampLighter at 2018-08-21 12:55 PM | Reply

I feel like cursive was dead when I was in elementary school.

But. That doesn't mean it shouldn't be taught. But. Perhaps as part of a creative writing elective or as part of an art class.

#13 | Posted by ClownShack at 2018-08-21 12:55 PM | Reply

So when the power goes out there will be two groups of people: Those that can tell time and those who can't.

#14 | Posted by gracieamazed at 2018-08-21 12:58 PM | Reply

--They probably can't churn butter or shoe a horse either. Who gives a damn?

You never would've made it in my university experience. No computers, no internet, no "smartphones". All research papers and essays based on research in the college library with pen, paper, books, scientific journals, newspaper archives, etc. You'd be helpless.

#15 | Posted by nullifidian at 2018-08-21 12:59 PM | Reply | Funny: 2

You'd be helpless.

#15 | POSTED BY NULLIFIDIAN AT 2018-08-21 12:59 PM | FLAG:

As you would be if you had to shoe a horse or church butter. So what?

#16 | Posted by DirkStruan at 2018-08-21 01:04 PM | Reply

CHURN butter....

#17 | Posted by DirkStruan at 2018-08-21 01:09 PM | Reply

Clown,

Based on prior conversations I'm roughly 10 years older than you, so my school experience may have been a bit different.

I remember starting with second grade and all through middle school our teachers wanted us writing in cursive.

But then when we got to High School it was back to printing. I always thought that was strange.

#18 | Posted by JeffJ at 2018-08-21 01:15 PM | Reply

--As you would be if you had to shoe a horse or church[sic] butter.

--CHURN butter....

That mistake comes from relying on technology. Thanks for proving my point. You don't have to compose sentences with digital crutches, just spout out whatever and fix the mistakes later.

#19 | Posted by nullifidian at 2018-08-21 01:17 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

Ten Reasons People Still Need Cursive

thefederalist.com

#20 | Posted by nullifidian at 2018-08-21 01:19 PM | Reply

The most important aspect is the way different clocks condition your mind and influence how you think about Time itself.
With a clockface you see all time displayed at once and where you are in the total scheme of time.
With a digital display you only see the time right now and are not forced to consider the totallity.

#21 | Posted by TFDNihilist at 2018-08-21 01:33 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 3

"That mistake comes from relying on technology."

As you do.... for most of the things in life you use. The fact that technology is fallible diminishes that point not at all. Come to that, mistakes happen anyway. Autocorrect did not invent the typographical error.

#22 | Posted by DirkStruan at 2018-08-21 01:34 PM | Reply

Ten Reasons People Still Need Cursive
thefederalist.com

#20 | POSTED BY NULLIFIDIAN

NW

#23 | Posted by JeffJ at 2018-08-21 01:40 PM | Reply

--With a clockface you see all time displayed at once and where you are in the total scheme of time.

Good point, and to analogize it with writing, you have to see the total sentence, or paragraph, or sequences of paragraphs before putting pen to paper, because editing is such a hassle. It forces you to think it through.

#24 | Posted by nullifidian at 2018-08-21 01:51 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

laments the loss of the abacus when the Hindu–Arabic numeral system was introduced

#25 | Posted by ChiefTutMoses at 2018-08-21 01:56 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

these kids will also never know how to stand in line to pay a bill!

arrrgghhhhhhhhhhh

nulljfj

#26 | Posted by ChiefTutMoses at 2018-08-21 02:01 PM | Reply

these kids will never have to Call a theater to get accurate movie show timings

Oh My God!

#27 | Posted by ChiefTutMoses at 2018-08-21 02:02 PM | Reply

these kids also do not know how to record something on VHS!

We Are Doomed!

#28 | Posted by ChiefTutMoses at 2018-08-21 02:03 PM | Reply

-- laments the loss of the abacus when the Hindu–Arabic numeral system was introduced

"I learned how to do math with the ancient abacus -- and it changed my life"

www.vox.com

#29 | Posted by nullifidian at 2018-08-21 02:04 PM | Reply

and imagine
these kids will go up never having to carry around an encyclopedia.

the End is Nigh

#30 | Posted by ChiefTutMoses at 2018-08-21 02:05 PM | Reply

and here is the real kicker

these kids will not know how to pay for things with a check!

#31 | Posted by ChiefTutMoses at 2018-08-21 02:07 PM | Reply

or lookup a phone number in a Phone Book!

the HORROR!

#32 | Posted by ChiefTutMoses at 2018-08-21 02:09 PM | Reply

I'm not saying horror or fantastic, just different. Totaly in line with the disappearance of the inbetween.

#33 | Posted by TFDNihilist at 2018-08-21 03:14 PM | Reply

And cursive was only invented so you wouldn't need to lift your quill from the paper. Totally obsolete technology.

#34 | Posted by TFDNihilist at 2018-08-21 03:15 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

All those things you mock require you to pass through irrelevant knowledge to get to the info you want. A great way to expand your mind.

#35 | Posted by TFDNihilist at 2018-08-21 03:18 PM | Reply

--And what is the importance in cursive?
If one's cursive is good, it's pretty. If one's cursive is bad, it's illegible. With varying degrees between the two, cursive is a obsolete from of communication...
...for people who can't write without a touchscreen and voice recognition. Writing creates a disciplined mind. You can't just backspace and use spell check. You have to compose your thoughts before putting pen to paper, or even using a typewriter and dealing with the hassle of using whiteout.
#11 | POSTED BY NULLIFIDIAN AT 2018-08-21 12:48 PM

Imo, cursive requires less energy and makes sense. It's not just prettier, but more ergonomic - plus each persons cursive displays alleged personality traits and obviously some artistry, alignment, weight, angles and loops. There are so many interesting qualities including that written cursive is more difficult to forge, even in a 32x32 pixel 18 characters or less world. My Hebrew is horrible, but my Japanese is justified.

#36 | Posted by redlightrobot at 2018-08-21 03:37 PM | Reply

I remember both of my kids were taught how to tell time from an analog clock and also learned to write in cursive style. This was around 10 years ago.
It's fine for tradition sake, I guess.

I did have to show my teenage daughter a couple years ago how to use an old rotary phone. I thought that was funny, talk about feeling old.

I also taught my son how to drive a stick. I have an old 81' Datsun pick up. That's still a good skill to be handy with, I think.

#37 | Posted by shane at 2018-08-21 03:47 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

I also taught my son how to drive a stick...That's still a good skill to be handy with, I think.

#37 | POSTED BY SHANE

I tried the same with my oldest son, but he decided after 1 time (he actually did pretty well) he had no interest in learning.

First car I bought out of college was a stick. Very first thing I did was teach my girlfriend (who I married) how to drive it.

3 weeks later she and her aunt were coming back from South Bend and they hit a deer about 10 miles south of where her college roommate was staying (visiting her boyfriend). She called her roommate, explained the situation and asked if she could borrow her car to get home. Her roommate told her yes but warned that her car was a stick. My wife and aunt made it home and the next day I followed her out to her roommate to return the car. She doesn't like driving a stick but has no problem driving my car when we have to trade cars for some reason.

#38 | Posted by JeffJ at 2018-08-21 04:04 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

"First car I bought out of college was a stick. Very first thing I did was teach my girlfriend ... how to drive it. " - #38 | Posted by JeffJ at 2018-08-21 04:04 PM

I had a 1976 Toyota Corona with a four-on-the-floor. I threw in stick shift driving lessons to my then girlfriend when she bought it from me.

One summer job in high school I had a 1968 Ford F-150 with a 3-on-the-tree.

Then there was my 1971 MG Midget, also four-on-the-floor, that was my right-out-of-high school car. It was a go-cart for adults.

Good memories.

#39 | Posted by Hans at 2018-08-21 04:18 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

"That's still a good skill to be handy with, I think.

#37 | POSTED BY SHANE AT 2018-08-21 03:47 PM | FLAG:

It's a particularly good skill to have if you travel overseas and rent cars. 80% of European and Japanese car sales are manual. In the UK if you pass your driving test in an automatic car, you may not legally drive a manual car on that license.

#40 | Posted by Foreigner at 2018-08-21 07:28 PM | Reply

That's still a good skill to be handy with, I think.

It's also not difficult.

#41 | Posted by REDIAL at 2018-08-21 07:44 PM | Reply

Good luck getting them to figure out how to dial a rotary phone.

#42 | Posted by chuffy at 2018-08-22 12:57 AM | Reply | Funny: 1

Seriously, my cursive writing is bad. How bad, you might ask? I was told a few times my cursive looks like I was writing with my eyes closed and sneezing.

#43 | Posted by john47 at 2018-08-22 09:52 AM | Reply

Also, too, the math problems involving old timey clock faces are gone, i.e., what is the angle between the hands of a clock when it is 2:31?

#44 | Posted by john47 at 2018-08-22 09:54 AM | Reply

So many issues in one article! I learned to drive with a manual transmission in 1965; but my last stick was a '92 Tojo Corolla DX.

#45 | Posted by john47 at 2018-08-22 09:58 AM | Reply

#44 |

I keep yelling on the radio 'HE'S ON YOUR SIX!!' but nope, boom, another millennial shot down from the skies.

#46 | Posted by schifferbrains at 2018-08-22 10:58 AM | Reply

Which means learning to use a slide rule is right out for these youngsters?

#47 | Posted by getoffmedz at 2018-08-22 11:28 AM | Reply

#37 thru #40 - 1951 Chevrolet Deluxe had the worst column shift ever.

First, automatic trans in 1998. All previous were manual trans, foreign and domestic.

Left leg got weaker. A side effect.

#48 | Posted by getoffmedz at 2018-08-22 11:52 AM | Reply

...

You guys need to understand what Clickbait is and stop falling for it.

The story isn't true. That's not why they are doing it. Digital clocks are simply cheaper and last longer.

#49 | Posted by Sycophant at 2018-08-22 01:20 PM | Reply

Taking Notes By Hand May Be Better Than Digitally, Researchers Say ...
www.npr.org

#50 | Posted by nullifidian at 2018-08-22 02:44 PM | Reply

Taking Notes By Hand May Be Better Than Digitally, Researchers Say ...
www.npr.org

#50 | POSTED BY NULLIFIDIAN

Wow. That's not even what the article says.

It says taking notes with a computer may not be as good if you are doing it improperly (i.e. typing everything rather than synthesizing and organizing the information)...

#51 | Posted by Sycophant at 2018-08-22 02:55 PM | Reply

Submit your complaint to Google, whiner.

Taking Notes By Hand May Be Better Than Digitally, Researchers Say ...
www.npr.org
Apr 17, 2016 - "This is suggestive evidence that longhand notes may have superior ... "I think it is a hard sell to get people to go back to pen and paper," ...

#52 | Posted by nullifidian at 2018-08-22 02:59 PM | Reply

"Wow. That's not even what the article says." - #51 | Posted by Sycophant at 2018-08-22 02:55 PM

Another example of nullinazi's education from CNU*

*CliffNotes University.

#53 | Posted by Hans at 2018-08-22 03:04 PM | Reply

I always take notes on white printer paper; easy to organize, draw diagrams, etc. I would usually rewrite my notes in college, particularly when going through the maths. When I went to grad school, I noticed most of the successful students tended to have the same habit.

Back when I was a TA, I would take points off for sloppy handwriting or poor math presentation. Bad cursive was the worst. Don't do cursive at all if you can't do it well. But well written cursive is pretty and legible. I was taught 'Dylan' cursive. Sometimes when I write in a hurry it is a combination of cursive and print, but when I am thinking and taking my time I print.

And my kids, both teens, can read an analog clock just fine.

#54 | Posted by horstngraben at 2018-08-22 03:14 PM | Reply

Why Pen and Paper Beats a Laptop Every Time for Taking Notes

www.communicaid.com

#55 | Posted by nullifidian at 2018-08-22 03:16 PM | Reply

In the 2006 my hyperthyroidism got so bad that I had to write in bar character printing.
After my thyroid was fully ablated and my heart restarted I could write in cursive again.

#56 | Posted by ajwood at 2018-08-22 08:28 PM | Reply

If i connect a digital clock to an analog clock will obama grant me an interview as a stem stumper?

#57 | Posted by mutant at 2018-08-22 10:17 PM | Reply

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