Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Sunday, August 12, 2018

As the threat of cyberattacks on the United States launched by foreign adversaries grows, the federal government has been slow to respond. But changes announced Tuesday at the Department of Homeland Security, along with a new bipartisan bill aimed at shoring up DHS cybersecurity initiatives, will give newfound purpose to defenses against critical infrastructure hacking. At a cybersecurity summit Tuesday, Homeland Security secretary Kirstjen Nielsen announced the creation of the National Risk Management Center, which will focus on evaluating threats and defending US critical infrastructure against hacking. The center will focus on the energy, finance, and telecommunications sectors to start, and DHS will conduct a number of 90-day "sprints" throughout 2018 in an attempt to rapidly build out the center's processes and capabilities.

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"B-b-but, cybersecurity csar!1!"

#1 | Posted by GOnoles92 at 2018-08-12 01:28 PM | Reply


...At a cybersecurity summit Tuesday, Homeland Security secretary Kirstjen Nielsen announced the creation of the National Risk Management Center ...

Good to see the creation of an entity responsible for protecting our infrastructure, instead of the earlier scattered approach.

#2 | Posted by LampLighter at 2018-08-12 02:24 PM | Reply

The Department of Homeland Security specializes in defending against attacks of the past, encumbering everyone in the process, at great expense against largely imaginary threats.

#3 | Posted by bayviking at 2018-08-12 08:12 PM | Reply

As usual, a day late and a dollar short.

I wonder which of our liberties we will lose this time.

#4 | Posted by donnerboy at 2018-08-13 10:10 AM | Reply

It won't help a thing until they truly want to be cooperative. The problem so far has been that the FBI, DHS, etc. are a black hole, and it has to be, and businesses get no benefit from it. When I was the CISO at a bank, several of our other officers got called to the FBI's local office. We, along with one other FI in our area, had been found on a terrorist target list for a future attack. We had a long discussion and settled on some key points, the main one being they wanted us to work collaboratively with them and DHS on their cybersecurity efforts. It turned out what they really wanted was us to purchase more systems that provide better forensics and provide all of our security intel back to them. They said they would provide us better tactical maps that can help our defenses detect point of entries much quicker. In reality, all that happened was I implemented some new processes and procured some new tools (at the expense of my own budget), and had 4 of my guys take a week long training class to learn the new tools...just for this effort. When I sent them all the info, I heard nothing. When I inquired, I heard nothing. When I asked about info they can send me, I heard nothing.

It wasn't until I went to ISAC conference and sat in a symposium that had a high-ranking DHS official in it that I was able to get any response; mostly because when they went to the Q&A session I took the microphone and asked the guy why the "relationship" was so one-sided in my experience. Apparently this was by design and he was surprised the FBI had made it sound like it would be collaborative. I understand the FBI or DHS can't share everything but if they are going to ask businesses to spend money on providing them intel, they sure as hell better make it worthwhile. It's great to say they will work with the private sector but the government's idea of "working with" is crap. So far, I haven't heard or seen anything of them changing their processes and businesses are going to turn away quickly when they find out there isn't really much benefit to this.

#5 | Posted by humtake at 2018-08-13 12:38 PM | Reply

POSTED BY HUMTAKE

Forensics is really, really cool stuff. One of my favorite topics to study.

#6 | Posted by GOnoles92 at 2018-08-13 02:19 PM | Reply

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