Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Tuesday, July 10, 2018

Does your doctor's mental health and well-being affect the care you receive? A new study says yes -- burnout, fatigue and depression may affect major medical errors ... Medical errors contribute to an estimated 100,000 to 200,000 deaths per year, according to the Institute of Medicine. Burnout -- defined as emotional exhaustion or depersonalization -- occurs in more than half of doctors, according to the study ... Their findings, published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, suggest burnout, by itself, plays a large role in errors. Other independent factors affecting errors include the perceived safety of the workplace, physician fatigue and physician mental health.

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Per the article ...

The study also looked at symptoms of depression, including thoughts of suicide. Doctors reporting medical errors are more than twice as likely to have had thoughts of suicide in the last year -- 13 percent compared to 6 percent.

Whether depression leads to medical errors or medical errors leads to symptoms of depression is still unclear, but it seems to go in both directions.

"It appears burnout causes errors, and that errors cause burnout. Errors can certainly lead to physician depression," explained Dr. Tawfik.

So is there any hope to use this information to help patients receive better care -- and help doctors as well?

"Largely, the great part of this problem has to do with the complexity of the U.S. healthcare system," Dr. Jonathan Ripp, senior associate dean for Well-Being and Resilience at Mount Sinai Hospital and chief wellness officer of the Mount Sinai Health System in New York City, told ABC News.


Healthcare quality and safety experts say that 30% or more of everything done healthcare wise is waste with no benefit to patients. And what this boils down to is that doctors are burning about because they're ordering too many damn tests and treatments and/or are not prescribing enough preventive medicine and screenings.

In America, healthcare costs are about $3 trillion ... and if that is cut in half in the correct way by eliminating the waste, then doctors and nurses and the rest of the clinicians can sanely administer healthcare and not get burned out in the process.

#1 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2018-07-10 07:10 AM | Reply

Maybe the AMA needs to release their limit of the number of doctors they allow to go to medical school to keep salaries high.

#2 | Posted by 726 at 2018-07-10 08:50 AM | Reply

Yeah. It's happening in all professions.

#3 | Posted by BruceBanner at 2018-07-10 02:19 PM | Reply

As a practicing primary care physician and former private practice owner, the first thing we need to get back as time. It's ridiculous to think we can solve 4 problems in a 20 minute visit.

#4 | Posted by zarnon at 2018-07-11 12:48 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

Well, why didn't we think of that? Of course there is waste in medicine and there are unnecessary tests ordered. There are two main reasons for this. First, as physicians we are on the hook legally for our patient and a jury or expert witness may convince a jury that we were not reasonably prudent as a physician unless we order extensive testing. Second, there is a huge shift from the patient as a patient toward the patient as a consumer. My patients constantly demand testing from me, mostly unnecessary. We try to explain our methods to them, but sometimes you don't have time and you give in.

#5 | Posted by sariumkrellide at 2018-07-11 06:48 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

As a practicing primary care physician and former private practice owner, the first thing we need to get back as time. It's ridiculous to think we can solve 4 problems in a 20 minute visit.

#4 | POSTED BY ZARNON

Question -

Do you think ACO's (accountable care organizations) and population health management (both things aimed at "systemitizing" the approach to patient care) will put any appreciable dent into getting your time back?

Thanks!

#6 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2018-07-11 06:59 AM | Reply

"Maybe the AMA needs to release their limit of the number of doctors they allow to go to medical school to keep salaries high."

I'm no fan of the AMA and am NOT a member, but this is a huge straw man. Medical Schools regularly increase class sizes and new medical schools have been started. A medical school diploma isn't worth the paper it's printed on except as an admission ticket to residency. If a person really wanted to increase the pool of physicians, they would increase the number of residency slots, not just medical school slots. But that's a little more difficult, because you do actually have to pay residents. Not very much mind you -- I think I made $40,000 a year as an intern and that wasn't so long ago. Some of the funding is provided by Medicare, but the numbers of residents funded in that manner has been frozen since 1996 and I don't see Congress making a big push for this anytime soon. Additional residency slots above the 1996 level absolutely exist, but they have to find funding. Sometimes this is from Universities, but usually it is from health system revenues. Most health systems are pretty strapped for cash, so it's not easy to convince them to pony up for a resident. I am a former program director, which means a faculty physician who is in charge of a residency training program. I'm a former director because my health system decided that since my program was small and my specialty costs more than we bring in, that they would not fund positions. So we closed the program. This happens commonly and why my specialty (which I would prefer not to name) is slowly dying.

#7 | Posted by sariumkrellide at 2018-07-11 07:00 AM | Reply

"Question -
Do you think ACO's (accountable care organizations) and population health management (both things aimed at "systemitizing" the approach to patient care) will put any appreciable dent into getting your time back?
Thanks!"

In my opinion, ACOs exist to provide safety and some collective resourcing to health systems to allow them to contain their costs. There are also some QI/QA aspects that are good for patient safety, but my experience with them is that everything is still on the back of the provider. I didn't notice that my life was any less unpleasant in an ACO arrangement because the same productivity expectations are still there. Zarnon is spot on when they said that you can't solve four problems in a twenty minute visit -- but that expectation is still very much there. If you don't make the valiant attempt, your patient may complain to the patient advocate or at the very least your provider satisfaction scores will go down.

Practicing medicine is not fun anymore. Everything that was rewarding about it has slowly been taken away and I am now a data-entry and customer service clerk. Most of the physicians in my age group (late 30's) are saving like crazy so we can retire from medicine as. soon. as. possible.

#8 | Posted by sariumkrellide at 2018-07-11 07:12 AM | Reply

Well, why didn't we think of that? Of course there is waste in medicine and there are unnecessary tests ordered. There are two main reasons for this. First, as physicians we are on the hook legally for our patient and a jury or expert witness may convince a jury that we were not reasonably prudent as a physician unless we order extensive testing. Second, there is a huge shift from the patient as a patient toward the patient as a consumer. My patients constantly demand testing from me, mostly unnecessary. We try to explain our methods to them, but sometimes you don't have time and you give in.

#5 | POSTED BY SARIUMKRELLIDE

According to Dr Ken Kizer, of the ten things that drive rising costs in healthcare, America being a "consumptive society" is one thing that Kizer points out ... www.youtube.com [16:05 - 21:45] ... which I think dovetails with what you're saying about patients expecting and demanding tests or treatments ...

Do you think higher reimbursements tied to shared decision making ... www.nejm.org ... combined with patients having access to their medical records (i.e. blue button, etc.) so patients can literally see and track their care and promote greater patient involvment, will help in tamping down on unnecessary tests and treatments?

#9 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2018-07-11 07:14 AM | Reply

"Do you think higher reimbursements tied to shared decision making ... www.nejm.org ... combined with patients having access to their medical records (i.e. blue button, etc.) so patients can literally see and track their care and promote greater patient involvment, will help in tamping down on unnecessary tests and treatments?"

- Shared decision making is a fine idea, but all of the presentations I've ever heard on implementing have been so much handwavium.
- Patient access to medical records is also a good idea for empowerment, but it has made physician lives way worse. Instead of calling with results and being done with it, I write a memo to the patient through the EMR with their results. The patient then asks ten questions over the next few days about insignificant artifacts in their testing that they are convinced will be the death of them. Repeat. Repeat. Repeat.

#10 | Posted by sariumkrellide at 2018-07-11 07:24 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

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"SARIUMKRELLIDE"

I recently went to my doctor with a fool ailment. He took 120 seconds of his day and said it was athlete's foot. I followed his advice, used the prescribed medication without any results. He charged my insurance company and me $230.00 for those 120 seconds. Then after following his advice for 2 months I decided to go to a Dermatologist who told me, no it was not athletes foot but a more significant problem and she prescribed several medications, spent a good 20 minutes advising what I needed to do and, guess what, now the problem is going away!
BTW, my regular doctor has told me that his "other job" is as an Emergency Room physician. So, basically, he is working two jobs. I don't know what his finances are but I believe it is probable that he is too tired to do his job well on either of them. I know I won't ever go back to see him. I suspect that his motivation is greed and his patients are suffering because of it. When you can charge $230.00 for 120 seconds and get the diagnosis wrong I think the temptation is just too large to take advantage and get rich.

#11 | Posted by danni at 2018-07-11 08:30 AM | Reply

"SARIUMKRELLIDE"

You won't even consider the idea that doctors are far overpaid in our society will you? The AMA protects huge income for their members by limiting the supply of doctors. People of low means can get better healthcare in Cuba, as Michael Moore showed us in his documentary "Sicko."

#12 | Posted by danni at 2018-07-11 08:33 AM | Reply

Before the advent and widespread use of antibiotics Dr's lost more patients than they saved they were more into palliative care and bedside manner because it was the best thing, they had to offer.

Nowadays MD's are more like high paid technicians and people are the machines they work on using their fancy machinery.

It feels a tad impersonal but

Honestly... medical care overall... has never been better... when you have access to it.

I think people need to stop expecting MD's to be Dr. Welby... those days are long gone.

Nowadays you might die from a medical mistake but your averages are a lot better than a hundred years ago when a scraped knee could kill you.

#13 | Posted by RightisTrite at 2018-07-11 09:11 AM | Reply

"I recently went to my doctor with a fool ailment. He took 120 seconds of his day and said it was athlete's foot. I followed his advice, used the prescribed medication without any results. He charged my insurance company and me $230.00 for those 120 seconds. Then after following his advice for 2 months I decided to go to a Dermatologist who told me, no it was not athletes foot but a more significant problem and she prescribed several medications, spent a good 20 minutes advising what I needed to do and, guess what, now the problem is going away!
BTW, my regular doctor has told me that his "other job" is as an Emergency Room physician. So, basically, he is working two jobs. I don't know what his finances are but I believe it is probable that he is too tired to do his job well on either of them. I know I won't ever go back to see him. I suspect that his motivation is greed and his patients are suffering because of it. When you can charge $230.00 for 120 seconds and get the diagnosis wrong I think the temptation is just too large to take advantage and get rich."

That primary care doctor saw 40 people the same day, which is excessive. You had a bad experience and I'm sorry for that. It shouldn't be this way, but that primary care doctor has a certain amount of productivity to justify their existence. It's probable that the ER duty your PCP has isn't a separate job, but just part of their contract. That's not uncommon for primary care, especially in rural regions or smaller towns. Contrast this with your Dermatologist who was able to spend 20 minutes explaining things to you because their productivity is derived from surgeries, not clinics especially if your Derm is Mohs surgery certified. By the way, your Derm makes 2-3x what your PCP does. Not sure who is guilty of avarice. Maybe both.

#14 | Posted by sariumkrellide at 2018-07-11 09:13 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

"You won't even consider the idea that doctors are far overpaid in our society will you? The AMA protects huge income for their members by limiting the supply of doctors. People of low means can get better healthcare in Cuba, as Michael Moore showed us in his documentary "Sicko." "

You have no idea what I will and won't consider, so don't make assumptions about my motivations. I agree that the AMA protects incomes, but it's almost exclusively for Surgeons and Proceduralists. One of the reasons for the mess we are in is that time is not reimbursed nearly as well as an imaging study or sticking a camera up someone's butt.

Personally, since I am not a proceduralist I do not make very much. After taxes, retirement, and after paying my ex-wife (yet another story of how practicing medicine creates problems) I live on about $2,500 a month. I drive a used Corolla. I clip coupons. My modest means don't bother me, but they do mean that you don't get to beat me over the head about how greedy I am. I would vote for some sort of national healthcare program tomorrow if it meant that I was not beholden to corporate medicine and could spend time with my patients.

#15 | Posted by sariumkrellide at 2018-07-11 09:21 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 3

"The AMA protects huge income for their members by limiting the supply of doctors."

You also didn't read my previous post about the complexities of increasing the supply of physicians. Read that before you go full conspiracy theory on us.

#16 | Posted by sariumkrellide at 2018-07-11 09:29 AM | Reply

"but they do mean that you don't get to beat me over the head about how greedy I am."

I wasn't beating on you, I was beating on my own doctor. I don't think all doctors are greedy, but some are.

"I would vote for some sort of national healthcare program tomorrow if it meant that I was not beholden to corporate medicine and could spend time with my patients."

I think we agree.

"You had a bad experience and I'm sorry for that. It shouldn't be this way, but that primary care doctor has a certain amount of productivity to justify their existence."

Justifying their existence at the price of $230.00 for, literally, 2 minutes? I won't ever be seen by that doctor again. I've never really been happy with him but that last visit convinced me he is just about the money.

#17 | Posted by danni at 2018-07-11 09:33 AM | Reply

Danni

Respectfully, is your foot still still attached to your ankle? I'm going to guess that the answer is yes.

And the Dermatologist you saw is a specialist doctor, so it's almost always the case that the Dermatologist is motivated to apply their specialty -- and this sort of thing applies to all walks of life, not just medicine.

Your primary care doc moonlighting as an ER doc highlights the problem in healthcare and US healthcare in particular ... the greatest doctor shortages are primary care providers and geriatricians, and that's because of the overall aging of the American population.

So why don't we have more of primary care providers and geriatricians? Answer: money.

Specialist docs get paid more, which drives much of the problem with unnecessary patient care. Who ensures this dynamic stays in place? Answer: Congress.

Steven Brill pointed out in his book 'Bitter Pill' that while the MIC lobbyists swarm Capital Hill to ensure bloated DoD spending, healthcare lobbyists spend 4 times MORE money lobbying than their MIC counterparts.

Healthcare and medicine is the most intense knowledge based and technology oriented endeavour humans have ever attempted ... youtu.be

To change this dysfunction requires paying primary docs (and geriatricians) more for their work, especially involving prevention medicine and screenings) ... and paying specialist doctors less for unnecessary surgeries aggressive care ... and the positive downstream effects of this change will be primary care docs not working two more jobs, along with attracting more talent toward these fields where the need is greatest.

#18 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2018-07-11 09:35 AM | Reply

"I'm no fan of the AMA and am NOT a member, but this is a huge straw man."

I have now read that post of yours, interesting and informative. I don't like our system from the very beginning, why should a medical school student graduate owing hundreds of thousands of dollars? That is why I don't always object to the high costs of medical care but I do think we could find a much less expensive way of educating healthcare professionals and providing healthcare services if we took insurance companies completely out of the picture. I believe that unnecessary costs, such as insurance companies, are the main ingredient to overpriced healthcare in the U.S.

#19 | Posted by danni at 2018-07-11 09:39 AM | Reply

I think people need to stop expecting MD's to be Dr. Welby... those days are long gone.

Nowadays you might die from a medical mistake but your averages are a lot better than a hundred years ago when a scraped knee could kill you.

#13 | POSTED BY RIGHTISTRITE

You're right about medicine never being better ...

But patient expectations are often unrealistic ... and the people who study these things like Dr. Kizer (post # 9) clearly explain that we are a "consumptive society", which explains allot about allot of things.

#20 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2018-07-11 09:43 AM | Reply

On the quality of medical care today....my daughter is alive and well after breast cancer. I am grateful to the doctors, nurses and other personnel who made that possible. I thank God every day for progress and science.

#21 | Posted by danni at 2018-07-11 09:55 AM | Reply

13

Great post. Couldn't agree more.

Danni......always getting screwed by the system.

#22 | Posted by eberly at 2018-07-11 09:56 AM | Reply

As a practicing primary care physician and former private practice owner, the first thing we need to get back as time. It's ridiculous to think we can solve 4 problems in a 20 minute visit.

#4 | POSTED BY ZARNON

Insurance companies are the ones that cause this. They set the reimbursement rates. A doctor that wants to earn $2,000,000 per year has to do a lot of high end specialization or see a lot and lot of customers. Yes customers. We aren't patients anymore. So to see a lot of customers they either push routine visits down to nurse practitioners and then spend 5 minutes to cover a 6 months of medical concerns.

That's why doctors that want to practice medicine the way it should be and make the money they desire switch to concierge medical systems. But only a select few in society have the funds to pay for that. They rest of us get the GP who is trying to listen, typing disagnosis into a computer and reading test results at the same time.

Doctors can either choose profits or patients. Most of them choose profit.

#23 | Posted by 726 at 2018-07-11 09:56 AM | Reply

"Insurance companies are the ones that cause this"

Followed by this.....

"A doctor that wants to earn $2,000,000 per year"

Frankie, how was it the fault of an insurance company that the doctor wants to earn $2 million a year?

Maybe the problem is the doctors expectation of earning $2 million a year just because they went to medical school.

Looks to me like it's the doctors greed, not the insurance carriers greed at play here.

#24 | Posted by eberly at 2018-07-11 10:10 AM | Reply

"Danni......always getting screwed by the system."

No more or less than you are. I'm just a little more honest.

#25 | Posted by danni at 2018-07-11 10:11 AM | Reply

Looks to me like it's the doctors greed, not the insurance carriers greed at play here.

#24 | POSTED BY EBERLY

The problem is not the doctors practicing medicine as much as the system the doctors are in, and the fault for that lies here ...

Steven Brill pointed out in his book 'Bitter Pill' that while the MIC lobbyists swarm Capital Hill to ensure bloated DoD spending, healthcare lobbyists spend 4 times MORE money lobbying than their MIC counterparts.

Reimbursement rates are set by the Center of Medicare & Medicaid Services where doctors representing their specialty argue over reimbursement rates ... guess who can cut thru all this? Congress.

If Congress had the intestinal fortitude do what's right and go against the healthare lobbyists representing all the different specialty doctors, they would legislate healthcare in a manner that creates higher emphasis on where the healthcare needs are greatest: primary care and geriatrics.

See how simple this is once it's understood where the healthcare problems are?

#26 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2018-07-11 10:39 AM | Reply

"Maybe the problem is the doctors expectation of earning $2 million a year just because they went to medical school.
Looks to me like it's the doctors greed, not the insurance carriers greed at play here"

Wow, I don't know anyone making $2 million a year. I'm sure they exist, but are few and far in-between. Your average primary care doc makes less than 10% of this.

#27 | Posted by sariumkrellide at 2018-07-11 01:36 PM | Reply

I'm just a little more honest.

#25 | Posted by danni

Hardly. You drag more personal drama into this place than any other 5 posters combined.

And I believe you do get screwed way more than myself.

Some of us are better at navigating through society than others. Healthcare, finances, real estate, etc.

I have a niece who reminds me of you. Always getting screwed over. Always a victim, family members being screwed over. Everyone is corrupt.

And strong political opinions as well.....very negative and harsh person.

26

Pinch, I don't disagree with any of that.

#28 | Posted by eberly at 2018-07-11 01:43 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

"Frankie, how was it the fault of an insurance company that the doctor wants to earn $2 million a year?"

Are you saying it's a virtue of the insurance company, or that insurance has nothing to do with it?
Doctors make more here than in the rest of the modern world.
Does insurance have anything to do with that?

#29 | Posted by snoofy at 2018-07-11 01:43 PM | Reply

27

I don't disagree with you. It was 726Frankie that offered it up, like an idiot.

It's specialists that earn the bigger dollars.

#30 | Posted by eberly at 2018-07-11 01:44 PM | Reply

"It's specialists that earn the bigger dollars."

Just about anything a specialist does wouldn't need to be done if someone who costs far less had performed a successful medical intervention earlier.

For example, you wouldn't need the cariologist if you had just listened to the physician's assistant who told you to lay off the double cheeseburgers.

But our system really struggles to reward preventive care with monetary incentives, when the obvious monetary incentive for the service providers is to let the person get so sick they need a specialist. Because these systems look at efficiency or value-based care, they are built on volume. Even managed care requires volume to deliver profits, by setting premiums a little bit higher than the Medical Loss Ratio.

#31 | Posted by snoofy at 2018-07-11 01:53 PM | Reply

"Wow, I don't know anyone making $2 million a year"

A friend of mine just retired at 55. He was an Ear, nose, and Throat MD.

He has a son at MIT, daughter at Harvard, and his youngest is in an extremely expensive high school. They were in Kansas where he earned his fortune as a doctor but moved to St. Petersburg, FL and lives in a mansion.

He has a ton of expenses right now with where his kids are in life... ... .obviously he was making way more as an ENT doc than I thought. 7 figures.

#32 | Posted by eberly at 2018-07-11 02:10 PM | Reply

#32

My cousin is head of oncology at a regional hospital. He owns his own island (it's a small one 45 acres or so) but still. The house on it is an old school southern plantation house. He has a pool and an outdoor kitchen. No idea how much he makes but I would imagine 7 figures.

Then again his dad is brilliant in the stock market and started him out with 10k when he was 13 never gave him a penny more, but plenty of advice. He graduated med school debt free so it is possible he makes peanuts as a doctor and all his income is from the stock market. My family strongly discourages discussing finances so I'll never know for sure.

#33 | Posted by TaoWarrior at 2018-07-11 05:55 PM | Reply

Wow, I don't know anyone making $2 million a year. I'm sure they exist, but are few and far in-between. Your average primary care doc makes less than 10% of this.

#27 | POSTED BY SARIUMKRELLIDE AT 2018-07-11 01:36 PM |

easy to believe

Honestly I don't believe many docs are over paid... I know there are some... same as any profession... given the expectations placed on them... most are sort of nerds so often they pursue other interests that help them accrue wealth. I know a doc that gave up private practice and went part time at a "doc in the box" to keep his license current and paid the bills with his "free time" he opened a bakery ... what he knew about chemistry he applied to baking bread products and pasta and his bakery pasta store made more money than being a doc ever did.

It looks like most make a comfortable living but not exorbitant

qph.fs.quoracdn.net

However when you are hurting and broke I'm sure it looks larger than the reality.

#34 | Posted by RightisTrite at 2018-07-11 09:00 PM | Reply

As a practicing primary care physician and former private practice owner, the first thing we need to get back as time. It's ridiculous to think we can solve 4 problems in a 20 minute visit.

#4 | POSTED BY ZARNON

How much of this is driven by commercialized medicine requiring X patients per day vs a demand for treatment that far outstrips the number of doctors available to provide said treatment?

#35 | Posted by jpw at 2018-07-12 09:15 AM | Reply

I know I won't ever go back to see him. I suspect that his motivation is greed and his patients are suffering because of it. When you can charge $230.00 for 120 seconds and get the diagnosis wrong I think the temptation is just too large to take advantage and get rich.

#11 | POSTED BY DANNI

SMH

You're just as ignorant and ridiculous as the righties around here.

#36 | Posted by jpw at 2018-07-12 09:30 AM | Reply

You won't even consider the idea that doctors are far overpaid in our society will you? The AMA protects huge income for their members by limiting the supply of doctors. People of low means can get better healthcare in Cuba, as Michael Moore showed us in his documentary "Sicko."

#12 | POSTED BY DANNI

God you're such a typical boomer.

Always thinking you're entitled to the Platinum plan for the price of the Copper plan.

Because fat ass loudmouth Michael Moore said so. Idiot.

#37 | Posted by jpw at 2018-07-12 09:32 AM | Reply

Just about anything a specialist does wouldn't need to be done if someone who costs far less had performed a successful medical intervention earlier.

That isn't remotely true at all. The equilibrium would change but not dramatically.

Preventative medicine would mitigate some cases completely but it would largely just require a specialist visitation later than we currently do. We simply live too long to avoid having to be treated oncologists, cardiologists, dermatologists ect ect.

#38 | Posted by jpw at 2018-07-12 09:45 AM | Reply

obviously he was making way more as an ENT doc than I thought. 7 figures.

#32 | POSTED BY EBERLY

Was he well established and respected in his field?

He may have had side gigs with pharma/med hardware companies (boards, advisory roles?) that significantly boosted his earnings.

#39 | Posted by jpw at 2018-07-12 09:49 AM | Reply

Didn't read the aritcle. I just know that "Doctor Burnout" is a good name for a super villain.

#40 | Posted by RevDarko at 2018-07-12 09:52 AM | Reply

Doctors can either choose profits or patients. Most of them choose profit.

I chose patients and went out of business. I tried. For over two years I took over a clinic and tried a "complexity" model where I charged more for the more problems a patient brought in. I had thirty minute and one hour time slots. I had to train the front office to count to three (any problems over two got a one hour visit). I only charged what insurers would pay.

It didn't work out.

I wanted to try a 'hybrid' model where people would pay a yearly fee to be part of practice but I'd still only charge insurers. I was told legally I couldn't do that (found out that wasn't true). By then I was kind of burned out on the idea, done. I took a job with a well known hospital based clinic. They are good at letting me run my practice the way I want except on the issue of time.

Do you think ACO's (accountable care organizations) and population health management (both things aimed at "systemitizing" the approach to patient care) will put any appreciable dent into getting your time back?

I don't think so. I don't see the groundswell to get back time. If there was an organized outcry and we showed this was the reason our quality has suffered, maybe.

"A doctor that wants to earn $2,000,000 per year"

Ha ha ha! You're talking to a primary care doc. I work a busy 4.5 days a week and make under 200,000. At least I get healthcare and vacation. Anything I've saved is more a result of compound interest than actual earnings (thank you Vanguard!).

Practicing medicine is not fun anymore. Everything that was rewarding about it has slowly been taken away and I am now a data-entry and customer service clerk. Most of the physicians in my age group (late 30's) are saving like crazy so we can retire from medicine as. soon. as. possible.

Exactly. The virtual patient care has also gotten completely out of hand. Any patient paperwork that needs filled out (DME, FMLA, etc) gets dumped on the primary care doc.

Pay off your house as well, it's a great feeling. Finally did that last year at 55. My retirement account didn't build up steam until the last few yaers so I won't be fully done until I'm 60. I am going to try locums in about a year or so until I hit the age of retirement.

#41 | Posted by zarnon at 2018-07-12 09:54 AM | Reply

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