Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Monday, July 09, 2018

Obesity affects 40 percent of adults and 19 percent of children in the United States and accounts for more than $168 billion in health care spending each year. Sugary beverages are thought to be one of the major drivers of the obesity epidemic. These drinks (think soda and sports drinks) are the largest single source of added sugars for Americans and contribute, on average, 145 added calories a day to our diets. For these reasons, reducing sugary beverage consumption has been a significant focus of public health intervention. Most efforts have focused on sodas. But not juice. Juice, for some reason, gets a pass. It's not clear why.

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Americans drink a lot of juice. The average adult drinks 6.6 gallons per year. More than half of preschool-age children (ages 2 to 5) drink juice regularly, a proportion that, unlike for sodas, has not budged in recent decades. These children consume on average 10 ounces per day, more than twice the amount recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Parents tend to associate juice with healthfulness, are unaware of its relationship to weight gain and are reluctant to restrict it in their child's diet. After all, 100 percent fruit juice -- sold in handy individual servings -- has been marketed as a natural source of vitamins and calcium. Department of Agriculture guidelines state that up to half of fruit servings can be provided in the form of 100 percent juice and recommend drinking fortified orange juice for the vitamin D. Some brands of juice are even marketed to infants.

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Mathew 10:34. Read it and weep.

#1 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2018-07-09 05:12 AM | Reply

This article brought to by the V8 corporation. Until they come for us next.

#2 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2018-07-09 05:17 AM | Reply

If fruit juice is wrong, I don't wanna be right.

#3 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2018-07-09 06:58 AM | Reply


Most of the parents I've known over the past 15 years or so have been diluting the fruit juice they serve their children, about 50-50 juice to water.

There is a lot of sugar in fruit juice. It is far better to eat the fruit than drink the juice.

Fruit juice consumption took hold as an easy way to eat fruits, but too much nutritional value is lost when all you have is the juice part of the fruit. The amount of sugar you intake is not offset by enough nutritional value.

#4 | Posted by LampLighter at 2018-07-09 09:21 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1


@#2 ... V8 ...

Watch the sodium levels in the V8 vegetable juices, the amount of sodium per serving is quite high. V8 does sell a low-sodium version. Most people think it tastes bland because they miss the salt. Once you become accustomed to the lower salt level, you actually start tasting the individual vegetables in the V8 juice.

#5 | Posted by LampLighter at 2018-07-09 09:34 AM | Reply

I just don't really care what they say about it, I have always drank juice, will continue to drink juice, gave juice to my kids and my grandkids and those "experts" are probably the same idiots who gave an elementary school I know an award for feeding kids waffles for breakfast because they were fat free. I don't listen to that nonsense any more, just take eggs for an example. One day eggs are good the next day they are bad then they are good again. I believe in a natural diet balanced with common sense. I don't count calories, I don't count fat, I just eat what I feel is healthy. I'm 67 and I'm not on any medication, still can run and live a healthy life.

#6 | Posted by danni at 2018-07-09 09:42 AM | Reply

Watch the sodium levels in the V8 vegetable juices, the amount of sodium per serving is quite high. V8 does sell a low-sodium version. Most people think it tastes bland because they miss the salt. Once you become accustomed to the lower salt level, you actually start tasting the individual vegetables in the V8 juice.

#5 | POSTED BY LAMPLIGHTER AT 2018-07-09 09:34 AM | FLAG:

Yummmmmmmmmmmmmm VS juice my guilty pleasure.

#7 | Posted by LauraMohr at 2018-07-09 09:47 AM | Reply

-- just take eggs for an example. One day eggs are good the next day they are bad then they are good again.

So much for "settled science."

#8 | Posted by nullifidian at 2018-07-09 09:48 AM | Reply

@#6 ... One day eggs are good the next day they are bad then they are good again. ...

That's due mainly to the fad nature of nutritional recommendations and the industry money behind some products.

With regard to the eggs thing, the research went from eggs being bad by a 51-49 ratio, to eggs being good by a 51-49 ratio, or thereabouts. There really wasn't a big difference in the findings, and I read that the egg industry jumped on the change and went on a rather large promotional campaign, paying nutritionists to appear on the daytime talk shows, etc., etc., etc.

So that very minor change in research results was blown all out of proportion, resulting in skeptical opinions such as yours.

The whole nutritional thing needs to get away from the fad-of-the-year mentality.

#9 | Posted by LampLighter at 2018-07-09 09:56 AM | Reply

All things in moderation is my guideline.

#10 | Posted by Twinpac at 2018-07-09 05:05 PM | Reply

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Even as an adult, I dilute juice 1 juice to 3 water.

I really only drink black coffee or water.

Maybe a beer or hard drink once in a while.

#11 | Posted by BruceBanner at 2018-07-10 09:13 AM | Reply

I never drink fruit juice. It's all too damn sweet. On a rare occasion I might drink about 2 ounces of OJ if I'm at a hotel breakfast that offers it. I rarely drink soda's either. Maybe 1-2 per year and only if that's all there is to drink.

#12 | Posted by jamesgelliott at 2018-07-10 10:37 AM | Reply

"@#6 ... One day eggs are good the next day they are bad then they are good again. ...

That's due mainly to the fad nature of nutritional recommendations and the industry money behind some products."

It's due to bad reporting more than anything else. When it comes to political reporting, the media, left and right are going to report whatever half truths they want presented as facts.

With science news, they are going to report wrong things all time because they are just going to report whatever they think will bet them the biggest ratings or the most clicks.

Hell, you don't have to be smart to be a reporter. You just have be able to read at a 10th grade level and look at least a little attractive.

#13 | Posted by jamesgelliott at 2018-07-10 10:42 AM | Reply

"When it comes to political reporting, the media, left and right are going to report whatever half truths they want presented as facts."

Both sides are the same argument. It's completely untrue. The right lies far more than the left, provably so.
Let's start with "tax reform." That term is a lie, it wasn't "reform" it was tax cuts for the rich. Now let's go to "right to life." That is expressed by so many who are so willing to tell insurance companies it is ok to rescind coverage when you get seriously ill or to charge you tremendous amounts if you have a pre-existing condition which will prevent you from getting coverage at all. I still remember those Republicans chanting "let him die" at a town hall meeting where they were discussing insurance. The right is great at coming up with nice sounding terms for evil things and they do secretly know how evil they are but it is profitable so they like it.

#14 | Posted by danni at 2018-07-10 10:59 AM | Reply | Funny: 1

Nutrition science is weak because we can't control what people eat to do randomized trials. We know there are nutrients you must get to avoid disease, but there is almost no valid science relating to diets for optimized health. Even if it was, people would not follow them so why bother.

Consuming a lot of sugar increases the risk of metabolic disease and changes the gut biome, which is associated with increased appetite and obesity.

I doubt drinking juice is bad if you are at an ideal weight, otherwise water or soda water is a better option.

#15 | Posted by bored at 2018-07-10 05:02 PM | Reply

I thought it was funny because you might drink 8 oz. of V8 or orange or something, or even less, but people drinking soda are drinking several cans a day, usually, sometimes even a lot more. And soda has no nutritional value. I don't even get how someone an make this comparison.

#16 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2018-07-11 12:32 AM | Reply

Many real fruit juices contain more fructose than sucrose. Fructose stimulates the ---------. Apple juice is used is used as a sweetener in most mass produced fruit juices. But many fruit drinks contain just 3% actual juice. All juices lack fiber, so its anything but clear that juicing is an ideal diet.

But the excess sucrose in our diet, which has contributed to a diabetes epidemic, is probably derived more from breakfast cereal, pastries, ice cream and other processed foods than sugar soda. Average consumption is just a little over pne can a day.

#17 | Posted by bayviking at 2018-07-11 07:18 AM | Reply

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