Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Thursday, May 17, 2018

Gina Haspel was confirmed Thursday to be the first female director of the CIA with the help of votes from a half-dozen Senate Democrats. Haspel was confirmed in a 54-45 vote, the culmination of a roller-coaster nomination that appeared to be in danger at several points after she was abruptly selected by President Donald Trump in March.

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Excellent news. First female CIA director; breaking glass ceilings!!

#1 | Posted by GOnoles92 at 2018-05-17 06:14 PM | Reply

I don't give a damn whether she's male or female. I do like the idea of having someone from the operations side of the house leading the agency for a while instead of another analyst.

#2 | Posted by bogey1355 at 2018-05-17 07:03 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Excellent news. First female CIA director; breaking glass ceilings!!

#1 | POSTED BY GONOLES92 AT 2018-05-17 06:14 PM | FLAG:

As well as legitimizing torture. Not only can you get away with it you can be promoted to top dog. One of Obama's greatest mistakes was to not address this and go after the responsible parties. History will judge his decision poorly as well as the Senate that approved this nomination.

#3 | Posted by dibblda at 2018-05-17 08:01 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Laura, the fix was in from the start, everyone inside the Beltway knew that, regardless of the torture allegations, she was the best candidate to lead Central Intelligence and was, in effect, pre-approved.

Now on to the next scheduled drama.

#4 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2018-05-17 08:07 PM | Reply

One of Obama's greatest mistakes was to not address this and go after the responsible parties.

Ever wonder why every country has one or more spy agencies?

They are necessary.

Just like closing Gitmo and other Obama promises regarding foreign intervention, once the mythical "Book of Secrets" is opened for the new POTUS, they sadly come to realize that certain aspects of their job are both distasteful and horrifying. Obama will not be looked on poorly historically because the world is a far dangerous place than most of us know.

#5 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2018-05-17 08:11 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

One of Obama's greatest mistakes was to not address this and go after the responsible parties.
Ever wonder why every country has one or more spy agencies?
They are necessary.
Just like closing Gitmo and other Obama promises regarding foreign intervention, once the mythical "Book of Secrets" is opened for the new POTUS, they sadly come to realize that certain aspects of their job are both distasteful and horrifying. Obama will not be looked on poorly historically because the world is a far dangerous place than most of us know.
#5 | Posted by Rightocenter

Blah blah blah blah --------.

We cant empty Gitmo because we have to way to retroactively justify the torture that many of the detainees went through. In any even semi-reasonable court of law all the evidence would be tossed. We should not be afraid of putting the worst of the worst on trial, but here we are cause bush had to torture. We are left with a blatant illegal, unethical immoral situation of people being held for decades without trial.

#6 | Posted by truthhurts at 2018-05-17 08:17 PM | Reply

Those that support torture are unAmerican traitors. America is supposed to be better than that.

#7 | Posted by LauraMohr at 2018-05-17 08:19 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

This is the logical conclusion for normalizing people like Gina Haspel instead of putting them in prison when you had the chance.

#8 | Posted by Ben_Berkkake at 2018-05-17 08:38 PM | Reply

I don't give a damn whether she's male or female. I do like the idea of having someone from the operations side of the house leading the agency for a while instead of another analyst.

#2 | Posted by bogey1355

I guess "operations" is one hell of a euphemism for "torture."

#9 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2018-05-17 08:51 PM | Reply

breaking glass ceilings!!

#1 | Posted by GOnoles92

And geneva conventions!

#10 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2018-05-17 08:52 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

One of Obama's greatest mistakes was to not address this and go after the responsible parties. History will judge his decision poorly as well as the Senate that approved this nomination. #3 | POSTED BY DIBBLDA

Doubt it. It may be writ about in far lefty blogivating "think-pieces," but those who live in the real world realize that having a former operator lead the agency is an excellently move for national security.

#11 | Posted by GOnoles92 at 2018-05-17 09:24 PM | Reply

"but those who live in the real world realize that having a former operator lead the agency is an excellently move for national security."

Maybe after you've spent a few years working in the real world, you'll realize there's no job history that automatically guarantees someone is going to be a good CEO.

But I doubt it. You seem like you've been drinking the Kool-Aid since around the time we elected Obama.

#12 | Posted by snoofy at 2018-05-17 09:29 PM | Reply

Doubt it. It may be writ about in far lefty blogivating "think-pieces," but those who live in the real world realize that having a former operator lead the agency is an excellently move for national security.

#11 | Posted by GOnoles92

YOu think declaring to the world that america isn't really against torture is great for our national security? You think it'll make people less eager to attack us?

#13 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2018-05-17 09:51 PM | Reply

You think it'll make people less eager to attack us?
#13 | POSTED BY SPEAKSOFTLY

The risk is either the same, or decreased. 90% of the time, terrorists in their country of origin do worse to their own people than what they're able to project overseas.

#14 | Posted by GOnoles92 at 2018-05-17 10:11 PM | Reply

You seem like you've been drinking the Kool-Aid since around the time we elected Obama.
#12 | POSTED BY SNOOFY

lol, so about the same amount of time you've been working on a thesis ;).

#15 | Posted by GOnoles92 at 2018-05-17 10:12 PM | Reply | Funny: 1

So you have been drinking the Kool-Aid.
Just as I suspected.

#16 | Posted by snoofy at 2018-05-17 10:14 PM | Reply

"Doubt it. It may be writ about in far lefty blogivating "think-pieces," but those who live in the real world realize that having a former operator lead the agency is an excellently move for national security."

You mean a terrible move for our troops. When we don't follow the Geneva convention or human rights standards, what do you expect to happen to us?

History has repeatedly judged immoral moves like this even when it seemed like a good idea at the time.

#17 | Posted by dibblda at 2018-05-18 12:08 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

When we don't follow the Geneva convention or human rights standards, what do you expect to happen to us?

When was the last time a captured American POW was treated in accordance with the Geneva Conventions? Would love to read about some historical examples.

#18 | Posted by GOnoles92 at 2018-05-18 06:22 AM | Reply

She's a Brennan crony and card carrying member of the deep state swamp and unrepentant torture advocate. Trump Fail! Sad.

#19 | Posted by visitor_ at 2018-05-18 08:15 AM | Reply

I'll probably catch hell for saying this but the "torture" committed post 9-11, in an era of hysteria, by our CIA and with our knowledge was possibly a mistake but one that most Americans supported at the time, demanded at the time. Ms. Haspel has acknowledged that it is not something we, as a nation, should do in the future but for so many to pretend today that they were diametrically opposed to waterboarding if it could deter another attack like the WTC is baloney. I'm as liberal as anyone here but I do not want to now cast blame on those whose only purpose was to protect us from another 9-11-like attack. I'm not some smug liberal looking down on the officers of the CIA who risked their lives on a daily basis to protect us, sure mistakes were made, but then attacks on our nation were also made and we expected our agencies to do everything they could to protect us, that is what those people thought they were doing. This woman has not been approved by our Congress to head the CIA and I am not going to now second guess them, the time to change policies was in the Presidential election, too few voted for Hillary Clinton so now I just don't want to hear anyone who was too Puritopian to vote for here complaining about who Trump appointed. Hey, go call Jill Stein. I just don't want to hear it.
Gina Haspel is the new director of the CIA and I wish her well.

#20 | Posted by danni at 2018-05-18 08:22 AM | Reply

#18 | Posted by GOnoles92, Actually we did fairly well in WWII, We had hundreds of thousands in the United States. German and Italian POWs. Most Japanese prisoners were kept in Australia or Pacific islands and there were not many of them. The worst abuses happened at the very end of the war in Germany proper. German soldiers were put into pens without food, water or shelter. Two reasons, the allies were swamped with prisoners, and they were not a priority to the high command, they were more concerned with finishing the war.. Secondly the average soldier had a very dim view of Germans. Many had liberated concentration camps and had been in a life and death struggle with these individuals for years. That BS you hear about fighting "Nazis" is untrue, the soldiers called them German. Nazis were seldom taken prisoner, if they had one of those party pins, or a SS tattoo we shot them.

#21 | Posted by docnjo at 2018-05-18 09:28 AM | Reply

WOW Danni how sad or you.

#22 | Posted by LauraMohr at 2018-05-18 09:48 AM | Reply

The risk is either the same, or decreased. 90% of the time, terrorists in their country of origin do worse to their own people than what they're able to project overseas.

#14 | Posted by GOnoles92

And the worse they can portray amercia, the more people they can convince to attack us. America committing torture is great for terrorist recruitment. America promoting torturers is the same thing.

#23 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2018-05-18 12:33 PM | Reply

"When was the last time a captured American POW was treated in accordance with the Geneva Conventions?"

What is the purpose of this question?
Is it that we should withdraw from the Geneva Convention?

Wouldn't that make us just like the terrorists?

Oh, I get it. You want us to be on the same moral footing as the terrorists.

Listen, just because you personally are on the same moral footing as the terrorists, that's hardly a good enough reason for our nation and our military personnel to abandon their morals and their oath to uphold the Constitution.

Maybe when you're a little bit older that will make some sense to you. But honestly, considering the path you're on, I suspect the most you will ever be able to do is give morals lip service.

#24 | Posted by snoofy at 2018-05-18 07:02 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Awe, that's the most virtue signaling I've ever seen you perform, snoofy.

#25 | Posted by GOnoles92 at 2018-05-18 09:11 PM | Reply

Not lowering our standards to match the terrorists is "virtue signaling" to you.

Congratulations, you built that!

#26 | Posted by snoofy at 2018-05-18 09:13 PM | Reply

Once you start down the dark path, forever will it dominate your destiny. Consume you it will!

--Yoda

#27 | Posted by madscientist at 2018-05-18 09:24 PM | Reply

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