Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Monday, February 12, 2018

Engineers at the University of Maryland, College Park (UMD) have found a way to make wood more than 10 times times stronger and tougher than before, creating a natural substance that is stronger than many titanium alloys. "This new way to treat wood makes it 12 times stronger than natural wood and 10 times tougher," said Liangbing Hu of UMD's A. James Clark School of Engineering and the leader of the team that did the research, to be published on February 8, 2018 in the journal Nature. "This could be a competitor to steel or even titanium alloys, it is so strong and durable. It's also comparable to carbon fiber, but much less expensive." Hu is an associate professor of materials science and engineering and a member of the Maryland Energy Innovation Institute.

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"The most outstanding observation, in my view, is the existence of a limiting concentration of lignin, the glue between wood cells, to maximize the mechanical performance of the densified wood. Too little or too much removal lower the strength compared to a maximum value achieved at intermediate or partial lignin removal. This reveals the subtle balance between hydrogen bonding and the adhesion imparted by such polyphenolic compound. Moreover, of outstanding interest, is the fact that that wood densification leads to both, increased strength and toughness, two properties that usually offset each other," said Orlando J. Rojas, a professor at Aalto University in Finland.

Hu's research has explored the capacities of wood's natural nanotechnology. They previously made a range of emerging technologies out of nanocellulose related materials: (1) super clear paper for replacing plastic; (2) photonic paper for improving solar cell efficiency by 30%; (3) a battery and a supercapacitor out of wood; (4) a battery from a leaf; (5) transparent wood for energy efficient buildings; (6) solar water desalination for drinking and specifically filtering out toxic dyes. These wood-based emerging technologies are being commercialized through a UMD spinoff company, Inventwood LLC.

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I could use a boyfriend with some super wood myself.

#1 | Posted by LauraMohr at 2018-02-10 06:57 PM | Reply | Funny: 6 | Newsworthy 1

Engineers at the University of Maryland, College Park (UMD) have found a way to make wood more than 10 times times stronger and tougher than before, creating a natural substance that is stronger than many titanium alloys.

My fiance figured this out about two years ago.

#2 | Posted by jpw at 2018-02-10 08:05 PM | Reply

I predict this thread gets the axe after about 10 comments LOL

#3 | Posted by jpw at 2018-02-10 08:08 PM | Reply

My fiance figured this out about two years ago. #2 | Posted by jpw

LOL, how lewd

#4 | Posted by GOnoles92 at 2018-02-10 09:41 PM | Reply

Does the wood go limp when it gets cold?

#5 | Posted by Crassus at 2018-02-11 02:10 AM | Reply

Being wood, I'm guessing it's much heavier than steel or carbon fiber.

#6 | Posted by TFDNihilist at 2018-02-11 03:40 AM | Reply

Superwood?

www.youtube.com

#7 | Posted by Tor at 2018-02-11 03:33 PM | Reply

YAY.
but will it withstand z-g?

#8 | Posted by ichiro at 2018-02-11 05:29 PM | Reply

Being wood, I'm guessing it's much heavier than steel or carbon fiber.

#6 | Posted by TFDNihilist

Really? Heavier than steel?

#9 | Posted by Sniper at 2018-02-12 12:22 PM | Reply

Being wood, I'm guessing it's much heavier than steel or carbon fiber.

#6 | Posted by TFDNihilist

You'd be wrong on steel. It's definitely lighter than steel and in some construction already a superior strength choice 25+ years ago when they built the Yooper Dome at Northern Michigan University.

Carbon Fiber - You'd be wrong again. Carbon fiber while being much lighter than Steel is not lighter than wood.

Specific Gravity of the materials:
Wood - ~.38 to .8 by species
Carbon Fiber - 1.8
Titanium - 4.5
Iron - 7.8

#10 | Posted by GalaxiePete at 2018-02-12 04:23 PM | Reply

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I guess they would have a little trouble pumping enough crap into wood to go from 0. something to 7.99

I am guessing it isn't as strong as carbon fiber.

#11 | Posted by Sniper at 2018-02-12 05:50 PM | Reply

#10 | POSTED BY GALAXIEPETE

I think the lesson there is that composites win.

FTA: "Hu's research has explored the capacities of wood's natural nanotechnology. They previously made a range of emerging technologies out of nanocellulose related materials: (1) super clear paper for replacing plastic; (2) photonic paper for improving solar cell efficiency by 30%; (3) a battery and a supercapacitor out of wood; (4) a battery from a leaf; (5) transparent wood for energy efficient buildings; (6) solar water desalination for drinking and specifically filtering out toxic dyes. These wood-based emerging technologies are being commercialized through a UMD spinoff company, Inventwood LLC."

That is pretty amazing stuff.

#12 | Posted by IndianaJones at 2018-02-12 07:34 PM | Reply

#11 | Posted by Sniper

So same with pumping enough crap into Carbon fiber right?

From the article: "This could be a competitor to steel or even titanium alloys, it is so strong and durable. It's also comparable to carbon fiber, but much less expensive."

#13 | Posted by GalaxiePete at 2018-02-12 07:41 PM | Reply

"I am guessing it isn't as strong as carbon fiber.
#11 | POSTED BY SNIPER"

You poor grunt. If you knew how to read, you wouldn't have to guess so much.

#14 | Posted by mOntecOre at 2018-02-12 08:05 PM | Reply | Funny: 1 | Newsworthy 1

super guitars.

#15 | Posted by ichiro at 2018-02-13 02:01 AM | Reply

...with tone.

#16 | Posted by ichiro at 2018-02-13 02:02 AM | Reply

Wood the beautiful building material which will lose all its gorgeous features during this processing and look ore like particle board or even clear plastic apparently. It major drawback in industrial design is its flammability. However, it is easier to repair a wood building damaged by fire than a steel one, so insurance rates are lower.

#17 | Posted by bayviking at 2018-02-13 06:06 AM | Reply

You poor grunt. If you knew how to read, you wouldn't have to guess so much.

#14 | Posted by mOntecOre

Just exactly is the definition of comparable? Is it stronger or weaker? Tell me oh wise one.

It's also comparable to carbon fiber

#18 | Posted by Sniper at 2018-02-13 01:05 PM | Reply

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