Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Monday, February 05, 2018

A fear of dying plays a role in people buying bottled water, even though they know it may not be good for them or the planet, a study from the University of Waterloo has found. The study suggests that most bottled-water advertising campaigns target a deep psychological vulnerability in humans, compelling them to buy and consume particular products. Bottled water ads specifically trigger our most subconscious fear -- driving Canadians to buy billions of litres of water annually.

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"Bottled water advertisements play on our greatest fears in two important ways," says Stephanie Cote, who conducted the research while a graduate student at Waterloo. "Our mortality fears make us want to avoid risks and, for many people, bottled water seems safer somehow, purer or controlled.

"There is also a deeper subconscious force at work here, one that caters to our desire for immortality."

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The article then basically goes on to spell out how Canadians are really just a bunch of weak-minded mind-control victims, which I have suspected for a long time. So if you really want to know the truth about Canada, read the rest of the article.

#1 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2018-02-03 03:56 AM | Reply

Bottled water is for stupid people. I have never been a person too good to drink tap water, I hope I never become so weak that I let corporations convince me that I should depend on them for water. When I was a kid we joked about someday we'd have to buy water in bottles, Americans are just as weak minded as Canadians on this topic.

#3 | Posted by danni at 2018-02-05 08:46 AM | Reply

BS. Most of this use is the same reason we drink out of cans, convenience.

#4 | Posted by bayviking at 2018-02-05 09:14 AM | Reply

#1 | Posted by HeliumRat

Marketers get paid to make people look weak minded. Don't forget big companies do serious research into what works - such as into Terror Management Theory as outlined in the article.

Speaking of weak minded - the average Trump voter.

#5 | Posted by GalaxiePete at 2018-02-05 09:39 AM | Reply

Bottled water ain't a new thing. They had that back in them olden days too.

#6 | Posted by LauraMohr at 2018-02-05 09:43 AM | Reply

en.wikipedia.org

Although vessels to bottle and transport water were part of the earliest human civilizations,[1] bottling water began in the United Kingdom with the first water bottling at the Holy Well in 1621.[2] The demand for bottled water was fueled in large part by the resurgence in spa-going and water therapy among Europeans and American colonists in the 17th and 18th centuries.[3] The first commercially distributed water in America was bottled and sold by Jackson's Spa in Boston in 1767.[4] Early drinkers of bottled spa waters believed that the water at these mineral springs had therapeutic properties and that bathing in or drinking the water could help treat many common ailments.[3]

The popularity of bottled mineral waters quickly led to a market for imitation products. Carbonated waters developed as means for approximating the natural effervescence of spring-bottled water, and in 1809 Joseph Hawkins was issued the first U.S. patent for "imitation" mineral water.[5] As technological innovation in nineteenth century lowered the cost of making glass and improved production speed for bottling, bottled water was able to be produced on a larger scale and the beverage grew in popularity.[4] Bottled water was seen by many as a safer alternative to 19th century municipal water supplies that could be contaminated with pathogens like cholera and typhoid.[6] By the middle of the century, one of America's most popular bottlers, Saratoga Springs, was producing more than 7 million bottles of water annually.[4]

In the United States, the popularity of bottled water declined in the early 20th century, when the advent of water chlorination reduced public concerns about water-borne diseases in municipal water supplies.[4] However, it remained popular in Europe, where it spread to cafes and grocery stores in the second half of the century.[6] In 1977, Perrier launched a successful advertisement campaign in the United States, heralding a rebirth in popularity for bottled water.[4] Today, bottled water is the second most popular commercial beverage in the United States, with about half the domestic consumption as soft drinks.[7]

#7 | Posted by LauraMohr at 2018-02-05 09:46 AM | Reply

"Bottled water ain't a new thing. They had that back in them olden days too."

It's always been around but most of us didn't drink it. Realize too, those who bottle water would like nothing better than to have confidence in the quality of tap water to fall so that they could sell us even more bottled water.

#8 | Posted by danni at 2018-02-05 12:24 PM | Reply

I would say bottled water is evidence pure libertarianism is either stupid or cruel.

#9 | Posted by IndianaJones at 2018-02-06 01:04 AM | Reply

It easy to see why such a dry, arid country like Canada depends on bottle water.

#10 | Posted by CrisisStills at 2018-02-06 10:30 AM | Reply

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