Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Thursday, February 01, 2018

The growth of a homeless day camp at the halls of civic power speaks to the breadth of Los Angeles' burgeoning homelessness problem. The number of those living in the streets and shelters of the city of L.A. and most of the county surged 75% -- to roughly 55,000 from about 32,000 -- in the last six years. (Including Glendale, Pasadena and Long Beach, which conduct their own homeless counts, the total is nearly 58,000.)

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According to some on DR California poverty is different, homeless in California don't know how lucky they have it........

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The stock market is at an all time high. The economy is great.

It's time to stop measuring how well the economy is doing by how the rich are doing.

#1 | Posted by 726 at 2018-02-01 02:15 PM | Reply

Blue state government model worsens income disparity. Like one hand on a stove and the other in a freezer the average looks good.

#2 | Posted by visitor_ at 2018-02-01 02:53 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

It's okay. They will migrate North when the weather warms up.

#3 | Posted by HanoverFist at 2018-02-01 02:55 PM | Reply

#1 | POSTED BY 726 AT 2018-02-01 02:15 PM | REPLY

California's government employee pension system is only solvent because of stock market gains.

#4 | Posted by sitzkrieg at 2018-02-01 02:59 PM | Reply

Los Angeles has been run by Democrats for decades.

#5 | Posted by nullifidian at 2018-02-01 03:02 PM | Reply | Funny: 2 | Newsworthy 1

Funny how you conservatives love to try and pick on California. We must really get under your skin.

Good.

It's probably because we have the worlds 8th largest economy and dang it no matter how they pray we just won't fail like they want us to. So you might as well go pick on Hawaii or New York.

The highest rates of homelessness among states are in Hawaii (465 per 100,000), followed by New York (399) and California (367).

California was one of 19 states to raise the minimum wage in 2017. It currently resides at $10.50 and will increase until it reaches $15 in 2022. Much to the chagrin of other low-wage fully employed workers, residents who are on welfare in this Western state see a $7.37 hourly difference between welfare and minimum wage payouts.

Total welfare benefits package: $35,287
Pre-tax wage equivalent: $37,160
Hourly wage equivalent: $17.87
State hourly minimum wage for 2017: $10.50

New York's minimum wage varies across the state, depending on geographic location and employer size. Residents in New York City can earn a minimum wage as high as $13, where others only earn $9.70 per hour. Regardless, welfare recipients in the state could earn $11.31 more than minimum-wage workers.

Total welfare benefits package: $38,004
Pre-tax wage equivalent: $43,700
Hourly wage equivalent: $21.01
State hourly minimum wage for 2017: $9.70

The biggest discrepancy between welfare and minimum-wage payouts is seen in Hawaii with an astonishing gap of $19.88. Not only do residents receive nearly $50,000 in welfare aid, the hourly equivalent is comparable to the national median salary of an electrical engineering technician. But it's best to note that the high cost of living in this state could distort the data. Regardless, such a high discrepancy between working and welfare is pretty hard to dismiss.

Total welfare benefits package: $49,175
Pre-tax wage equivalent: $60,590
Hourly wage equivalent: $29.13
State hourly minimum wage for 2017: $9.25

#6 | Posted by donnerboy at 2018-02-01 07:02 PM | Reply

#2 | POSTED BY VISITOR

Actually good weather that doesn't kill you outside of a shelter explains the LA Homelessness.

But you know, no one expects a russian troll to think critically.

#7 | Posted by IndianaJones at 2018-02-01 07:48 PM | Reply

Blue state government model worsens income disparity. Like one hand on a stove and the other in a freezer the average looks good.

#2 | Posted by visitor_ at 2018-02-01 02:53 PM | Reply | Flag:

Have you been to Alabama? It beats out California in inequality.

List of U.S. states by Gini coefficient of income inequality

The list goes from lowest Gini coefficient to the highest. The Gini index for the United States as a whole is 0.469.

34 North Carolina 0.464
37 Illinois 0.465
38 Kentucky 0.466
39 Rhode Island 0.467
40 Georgia 0.468
40 Mississippi 0.468
40 Tennessee 0.468
43 Texas 0.469
44 California 0.471
45 Alabama 0.472
46 Florida 0.474
47 Louisiana 0.475
47 Massachusetts 0.475
49 Connecticut 0.486
50 New York 0.499
51 District of Columbia 0.532

#8 | Posted by 726 at 2018-02-02 08:25 AM | Reply

In the accurate way to measure poverty, the Supplemental Poverty Measure, California is #1. Followed by DC, Nevada, Florida, Arizona, Louisiana, Georgia, New York, Hawaii, Arkansas, Texas..

Least poverty: Iowa, North Dakota, Wyoming, Minnesota, Nebraska, Maryland, Oregon, South Dakota, Wisconsin, Maine, Kansas, Utah...

#9 | Posted by sitzkrieg at 2018-02-02 09:22 AM | Reply

726 Your source has slightly different values than this one. This source has CA being slightly worse than AL by a smidgen in 2015. I would not consider it a win for the blue model to be so close to AL.

www.americashealthrankings.org

#10 | Posted by visitor_ at 2018-02-02 11:17 AM | Reply

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