Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Tuesday, January 16, 2018

An Army veteran is suing a Veterans Administration hospital in Connecticut after he says someone left a scalpel inside him after surgery, and it was only discovered years later, after he suffered from long-term abdominal pain. Glenford Turner, of Bridgeport, sued the VA in U.S. District Court last week. According to court papers, Turner had surgery at the VA hospital in West Haven in 2013. Nearly four years later, he went back to the VA with dizziness and severe abdominal pain. An X-Ray showed there was a scalpel inside his body. Turner had to undergo surgery to remove the instrument, and his lawyer, Joel Faxon, says doctors confirmed it was the same scalpel. Faxon calls it "an incomprehensible level of incompetence."

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2 to 4 million Americans are injured every year in American hospitals and clinics ...

youtu.be
[0:50 thru 1:20]

Medical errors happen all the time in all American hospitals.

The reason the VA gets more attention is because it's public and it has its mistakes and problems aired publicly ... while private healthcare is able to keep mistakes hidden thru things like gag orders tied to settlements.

#1 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2018-01-15 06:03 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 4

Hundreds of thousands of scalpels didn't get left inside anyone today!
--Gun Lover Logic

#2 | Posted by snoofy at 2018-01-15 06:10 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

Veteran takes medical equipment without authorization. Lock him up.

#3 | Posted by bored at 2018-01-15 06:34 PM | Reply

Moocher has been getting four years of iron supplements for free.
Lock Him Up!

#4 | Posted by snoofy at 2018-01-15 06:47 PM | Reply | Funny: 1

What surgeons leave behind costs some patients dearly

www.usatoday.com

A USA TODAY review of government data, academic studies and legal records suggests that far more people may be victims of lost surgical objects than federal statistics suggest.

And the medical community's inaction comes at a high price.

Thousands of victims: There's no federal reporting requirement when hospitals leave sponges or other items in patients, but research studies and government data suggest it happens between 4,500 and 6,000 times a year.

That's up to twice government estimates, which run closer to 3,000 cases, and sponges account for more than two-thirds of all incidents.

Solutions ignored: The nation's hospitals have balked at using electronic technologies that sharply cut the risk of sponges being left in patients.

Fewer than 15% of U.S. hospitals use sponges equipped with electronic tracking devices, based on a USA TODAY survey of the companies that make those products.

MANY CASES, FEW CHANGES

There's no telling precisely how many victims are out there.

More than half of the states require reporting of medical errors, including lost surgical items, but a 2012 study by the inspector general for the U.S.

Department of Health and Human Services found hospitals reporting just 1% of the events they were supposed to record in those states.

National estimates of about 3,000 cases a year are based on hospital billing records analyzed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, but experts believe many cases aren't captured in those records.


Fixing U.S. Healthcare fixes the problem of surgical instruments being left inside patients.

#5 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2018-01-15 06:53 PM | Reply

This is the problem with single payer. No one was responsible or cared that this man left the hospital with valuable property.

#6 | Posted by visitor_ at 2018-01-16 01:59 PM | Reply

When the director of the hospital learned of the surgeon's habit of leaving tools behind in patients he told the surgeon to cut it out.

#7 | Posted by IndianaJones at 2018-01-16 03:16 PM | Reply | Funny: 3

#5 | POSTED BY PINCHALOAF

The answer is tort reform. That way, when hospitals screw up, they pay a couple bucks and don't have to worry about correcting the issue...like paying a parking fine! Currently, they get sued for millions and can be forced to change to avoid such costly lawsuits.

#8 | Posted by Sycophant at 2018-01-16 04:00 PM | Reply

"The answer is tort reform." - #8 | Posted by Sycophant at 2018-01-16 04:00 PM

A year or so after Texas voters approved their version of tort reform I read an article about some guy who was the victim of medical malpractice and was somewhat distraught that he had no choice but arbitration to settle his complaint.

Of course, he had voted for the tort reform measure, and said he did it to stop frivolous law suits, but his wasn't one of those.

Unintended consequences....

Oops.

#9 | Posted by Hans at 2018-01-16 04:07 PM | Reply

"The answer is tort reform." - #8 | Posted by Sycophant at 2018-01-16 04:00 PM
A year or so after Texas voters approved their version of tort reform I read an article about some guy who was the victim of medical malpractice and was somewhat distraught that he had no choice but arbitration to settle his complaint.
Of course, he had voted for the tort reform measure, and said he did it to stop frivolous law suits, but his wasn't one of those.
Unintended consequences....
Oops.

#9 | POSTED BY HANS

My favorite is the Medical caps idea. You get so much for an amputation, so much for disfigurement and so much for death. Your life is ruined, but here's $100,000. Thanks for playing!

#10 | Posted by Sycophant at 2018-01-16 04:14 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

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A year or so after Texas voters approved their version of tort reform I read an article about some guy who was the victim of medical malpractice and was somewhat distraught that he had no choice but arbitration to settle his complaint.

Texas tort reform did not require arbitration. Arbitration can only be required by agreement.

My favorite is the Medical caps idea.

Texas tort reform did not cap medical or any other actual damages. It capped consequential damages, i.e. pain and suffering etc., at $250K iirc.

#11 | Posted by et_al at 2018-01-16 04:24 PM | Reply

"iirc." - #11 | Posted by et_al at 2018-01-16 04:24 PM

Glad you can "if I recall correctly."

Apparently, that's not a courtesy you feel can be extended to others.

#12 | Posted by Hans at 2018-01-16 04:26 PM | Reply

Why would a doctor ever set a tool like that inside of someones body? It's not like they went spelunking in there carrying the scalpel and forgot it. I would think that it would be a big violation of rules to ever set anything inside of someone's body other than something that belongs there during the surgery like a clamp or tube.

#13 | Posted by LEgregius at 2018-01-16 04:29 PM | Reply

#13 When I had a C-Section in 1996 I remember after they took my son and before they closed me up they did an inventory of all tools, sponges, etc and accounted for every piece of equipment used.

#14 | Posted by gracieamazed at 2018-01-16 04:33 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

"Apparently, that's not a courtesy you feel can be extended to others."

what do you mean?

#15 | Posted by eberly at 2018-01-16 04:41 PM | Reply

#13 When I had a C-Section in 1996 I remember after they took my son and before they closed me up they did an inventory of all tools, sponges, etc and accounted for every piece of equipment used.

#14 | Posted by gracieamazed at 2018-01-16 04:33 PM

That would be standard practice in the OR, at least every one I've been in in 25 years. Which is not to say mistakes don't happen. Being human, and all. However, #13's post is also on point. That scalpel should have been handed back to the scrub immediately after it was used. No excuse for leaving sharps on the operating field, much less in the patient. If this all turns out to be legit, I'm shocked it didn't do more damage.

#16 | Posted by morris at 2018-01-16 04:42 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

#16 | Posted by morris

I do agree with you but it seems surgeons today as with your regular general practitioners are simply rushing from patient to patient. It's all about covering the expenses and making their income. It seems to get worse every year. My mother was is an RN. She worked surgery for 20+ years and then ran sterile processing another almost 20 - she has stories (and she is the reason I don't ride motorcycles...)

#17 | Posted by GalaxiePete at 2018-01-16 05:22 PM | Reply

noone ever gets to talk "bad" about the VA. how does someone who depends on the VA talk "bad" about the VA? it doesn't happen. righties blame socialism. the military is "socialism." i'm not the one, man,..are you the one? youtu.be

#18 | Posted by ichiro at 2018-01-16 09:42 PM | Reply

sofrep.com

www.hoffmanlegalgroup.com

www.clarionledger.com

arstechnica.com

#19 | Posted by ichiro at 2018-01-17 03:50 AM | Reply

www.motherjones.com

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/bush-apologizes-for-walter-reed-failures/

#20 | Posted by ichiro at 2018-01-17 03:55 AM | Reply

My favorite is the Medical caps idea.
Texas tort reform did not cap medical or any other actual damages. It capped consequential damages, i.e. pain and suffering etc., at $250K iirc.

#11 | POSTED BY ET_AL

Obviously that's what I was referring to. I mean I appreciate you trying to take it to a very lawyerly, high end level discussion for no other reason than to take it there, but obviously pure corrective medical procedures and long term care are hardly ever capped in these reform ideas. It's always "pain and suffering" damages that are capped in medical cap tort reform as they were in employment tort reform (what is now Workers Compensation).

#21 | Posted by Sycophant at 2018-01-17 04:00 PM | Reply

"Obviously that's what I was referring to"

right, because when you say "medical", you meant everything but the medical.

yeah...that should have been obvious to everyone.

LOL

#22 | Posted by eberly at 2018-01-17 04:08 PM | Reply

#17 | Posted by GalaxiePete at 2018-01-16 05:22 PM |

There's more to it than just greed. Surgeons expenses are ridiculous when you figure in maintaining one, or more, offices and staff, malpractice insurance, med school loans and a household on top of that. Not to mention that many of them are on staff at more than one hospital, plus surgery centers, and operate at multiple places on the same day. If Case A gets delayed or lasts longer than anticipated, their day blows up. Case B at another place may get bumped or their schedule blown up and the whole thing just snowballs into a major mess, with lots of phone calls and pressure to move things along. Very few docs get to work in just one hospital anymore. Not to mention whatever's going on in their home life. It's really become a suck job. Very lucrative, but the toll on them and their families is real.

#23 | Posted by morris at 2018-01-18 12:06 AM | Reply

Trump's fault. Bigly.

#24 | Posted by Greatamerican at 2018-01-18 01:05 AM | Reply

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