Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Monday, January 15, 2018

January 15, 2007. Washington Post Editorial Board:

MARTIN LUTHER KING JR., conservative. That description of the civil rights leader whose birth we celebrate today might surprise or even offend many of the people coming to town to celebrate the inauguration of a new president and the supposed triumph of conservatism in some form or other.

The faith that he defended and helped refine was a sort of national creed based on what had come to be widely accepted, after many painful years, as the immutable truth in the Declaration of Independence -- that all of us are created equal -- and on the idea that Americans are united not by race or by a particular religious belief or ethnic origin, but by our devotion to the concepts of popular government and individual rights.

This is a part of American "exceptionalism," but through much of our history, a greater part of it could be found in the kind of biblical message that Dr. King carried to the pulpit and the nation.

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"There is something wrong with our world, something fundamentally and basically wrong," he told a Detroit congregation in 1954. "The great problem facing modern man," he said, "is that ... the means by which we live have outdistanced the spiritual ends for which we live... . The problem is with man himself and man's soul."

For some, that may seem to be language for the church pew rather than the halls of government. But Dr. King showed that it was the kind of language that can also lead a nation to better itself, to renew its attention to the ideals on which it was founded, to proceed, however unevenly, toward equal justice under the law. Unfortunately, we've heard precious little of it, if any, in our national political discourse this past year.

"My friends," Dr. King said in his Detroit sermon, "all I'm trying to say is that if we are to go forward today, we've got to go back and rediscover some mighty precious values that we've left behind. That's the only way that we would be able to make of our world a better world, and to make of this world what God wants it to be... ."

Spoken like a true conservative, and a truly great one.

Comments

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Words to live by.

#1 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2018-01-15 11:44 AM | Reply

Sorry, that should read 2017, I couldn't cut and paste the date.

#2 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2018-01-15 11:46 AM | Reply

The same conservatives who spin MLK as one of their own are the same conservatives who call Colin Kaepernick a traitor.

#3 | Posted by Derek_Wildstar at 2018-01-15 01:11 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Here we go...

Fact:

MLK was a thorn in the side for a long time.

They let him live until he started talking about capitalism and the intersectional working class.

#4 | Posted by MrSilenceDogood at 2018-01-15 01:36 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

"It is unfortunate that demonstrations are taking place in Birmingham, but it is even more unfortunate that the city's white power structure left the Negro community with no alternative."

"We must recognize that we can't solve our problem now until there is a radical redistribution of economic and political power ... this means a revolution of values and other things. We must see now that the evils of racism, economic exploitation and militarism are all tied together."

"The solution to poverty is to abolish it directly by a now widely discussed matter: the guaranteed income."

"[W]e are saying that something is wrong ... with capitalism ... . There must be better distribution of wealth and maybe America must move toward a democratic socialism."

- "True conservative" Martin Luther King, Jr.

#5 | Posted by Derek_Wildstar at 2018-01-15 01:54 PM | Reply

#3

That's funny, I didn't realize that the Washington Post Editorial Board was conservative or called Kaepernick a traitor.

#6 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2018-01-15 01:55 PM | Reply

"Each year on Martin Luther King Day, let us not only recall Dr. King, but rededicate ourselves to the Commandments he believed in and sought to live every day: Thou shall love thy God with all thy heart, and thou shall love thy neighbor as thyself. And I just have to believe that all of us -- if all of us, young and old, Republicans and Democrats, do all we can to live up to those Commandments, then we will see the day when Dr. King's dream comes true."

Ronald Reagan, Remarks on Signing the Bill Making the Birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr., a National Holiday, November 2, 1983

#7 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2018-01-15 02:04 PM | Reply

#6 he's referring to you, not them.

#8 | Posted by snoofy at 2018-01-15 02:09 PM | Reply

Washpo, in straining to make a point, makes the same mistake a lot of people make of conflating American "conservatism" with Christianity.

MLK was a progressive politically and more connected to original Christianity than the politicized religionism (google that werd if necessary) that passes for Christianity these days.

#9 | Posted by Corky at 2018-01-15 02:28 PM | Reply

Also worth noting:

You never see the left try do this sort of thing with the right's icons.

No one wants anything to do with you people, not even the dead ones who seem less like the ------ they were when they were alive.

#10 | Posted by MrSilenceDogood at 2018-01-15 03:01 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

crooksandliars.com

There's A Reason Conservatives Shouldn't Claim Martin Luther King: When He Was Alive, They Smeared And Demonized Him

#11 | Posted by LauraMohr at 2018-01-15 04:39 PM | Reply

Beyond the frontal assault on race relations, MLK wanted to right the plight of all poor people and stop American militarism. To pretend these are issues conservatives care about is absurd. Racists Conservatives murdered him under the nose of the ultra conservative FBI & CIA with assistance from the mob. Conservative Hoover considered MLK to be the biggest threat to his vision of Government in the USA. Conservative Nixon hated MLK but thought Malcolm-X was a greater threat.

#12 | Posted by bayviking at 2018-01-15 05:35 PM | Reply

i agree with the HL. however, in today's time, it's backwards.

#13 | Posted by ichiro at 2018-01-16 09:48 PM | Reply

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