Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Wednesday, January 10, 2018

When Ada JoAnn Taylor is tense, she thinks she can feel the fabric of a throw pillow in the pads of her fingers. Taylor has suffered from tactile flashbacks for three decades. She imagines herself in a small apartment in Beatrice, Nebraska. She is gripping the edges of a pillow, more tightly than she means to, and suffocating a sixty-eight-year-old widow. "I feel for her," Taylor told me recently. "She was my grandmother's age."

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Taylor confessed to the woman's murder in 1989 and for two decades believed that she was guilty. She served more than nineteen years for the crime before she was pardoned. She was one of six people accused of the murder, five of whom took pleas; two had internalized their guilt so deeply that, even after being freed, they still had vivid memories of committing the crime. In no other case in the United States have false memories of guilt endured so long. The situation is a study in the malleability of memory: an implausible notion, doubted at first, grows into a firmly held belief that reshapes one's autobiography and sense of identity.

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Amazing. Thank you.

#1 | Posted by BruceBanner at 2018-01-10 05:12 PM | Reply

It's an interesting phenomenon where people confess to crimes they aren't involved in. I don't really understand it. I can't imagine a scenario where I would begin to believe I was responsible for a crime that I didn't commit.

Weird.

#2 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2018-01-11 12:19 PM | Reply

"I can't imagine a scenario where I would begin to believe I was responsible for a crime that I didn't commit." - #2 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2018-01-11 12:19 PM

Astonishingly, more than 1 out of 4 people wrongfully convicted but later exonerated by DNA evidence made a false confession or incriminating statement.

The reasons that people falsely confess are complex and varied, but what they tend to have in common is a belief that complying with the police by saying that they committed the crime in question will be more beneficial than continuing to maintain their innocence.

You didn't know that?

Weird.

#3 | Posted by Hans at 2018-01-11 12:26 PM | Reply

"I don't really understand it."

Are you saying you believe it but don't understand how it works?

Or are you saying you don't understand it, and therefore you don't believe it?

(One of those statements is Trump Voter territory.)

#4 | Posted by snoofy at 2018-01-11 12:38 PM | Reply

One of the tactic used in police interrogations is to make interviews go on for long hours or days, repeating the same questions again and again. The reason, truth does not change. Lies, no mater how well thought out will. Confronted with the inconsistencies, the subject usually caves. Fortunately most crimes do not allow for that investment of time and resources. Murders do.

#5 | Posted by docnjo at 2018-01-11 01:15 PM | Reply

That is why the first and only words out of your mouth when dealing with police is "I want a lawyer"

#6 | Posted by truthhurts at 2018-01-11 01:31 PM | Reply

#6 | Posted by truthhurts, True, never speak to the police without counsel, you haven't got a chance. These cops have been doing interrogations for years. Even if you are innocent, any inconstancy can be ruled a felony, IE- impeding an investigation.

#7 | Posted by docnjo at 2018-01-11 01:54 PM | Reply

- a belief that complying with the police by saying that they committed the crime in question will be more beneficial than continuing to maintain their innocence.

You didn't know that?
Weird.

#3 | POSTED BY HANS

You didn't read the article? Expected.

#8 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2018-01-11 03:32 PM | Reply

Are you saying you believe it but don't understand how it works?
Or are you saying you don't understand it, and therefore you don't believe it?
(One of those statements is Trump Voter territory.)

#4 | POSTED BY SNOOFY

I'm saying exactly what I wrote.

#9 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2018-01-11 03:34 PM | Reply

"I'm saying exactly what I wrote."

I'm asking you what it means.

You wrote. "I can't imagine a scenario where I would begin to believe I was responsible for a crime that I didn't commit."

Okay.

Can you imagine a scenario where that would happen to someone else?

Or do you simply think it just can't happen?

#10 | Posted by snoofy at 2018-01-11 04:04 PM | Reply

#8 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2018-01-11 03:32 PM

You responded with a non sequitur reply, exposing an acute case of cognitive dissonance.

Expected.

#11 | Posted by Hans at 2018-01-11 04:12 PM | Reply

- Or do you simply think it just can't happen?

Obviously it happens, which is the bulk of the article.

You seem like you have something you're itching to get out.
Go ahead and tell me how this happens all the time to you. and lots of other people you know.

#12 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2018-01-11 06:14 PM | Reply

"Obviously it happens, which is the bulk of the article."

Okay. So you're saying you can't imagine it happening to you.

You are unable to experience empathy. Got it.

Coincidentally, are you a Trump voter? In my experience, one thing Trump voters have in common is an inability to empathize.

#13 | Posted by snoofy at 2018-01-11 06:16 PM | Reply

"Obviously it happens, which is the bulk of the article."

Okay. So you're saying you can't imagine it happening to you.

You are unable to experience empathy. Got it.

Coincidentally, are you a Trump voter? In my experience, one thing Trump voters have in common is an inability to empathize.

#14 | Posted by snoofy at 2018-01-11 06:17 PM | Reply

#11 | ANKLEBYTE BY HANS

#15 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2018-01-11 06:18 PM | Reply

#15 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2018-01-11 06:18 PM

I obviously used words in my #11 above your level of comprehension.

Hence, your latest non sequitur reply.

#16 | Posted by Hans at 2018-01-11 10:41 PM | Reply

#16 | POSTED BY HANS

The wet spot you left on my ankle is disgusting.

#17 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2018-01-12 11:01 AM | Reply

"The wet spot you left on my ankle is disgusting." - #17 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2018-01-12 11:01 AM

Another non sequitur reply.

Completely expected.

#18 | Posted by Hans at 2018-01-12 11:48 AM | Reply

"Another non sequitur reply."

Let us know when that actually bothers you.

#19 | Posted by eberly at 2018-01-12 11:53 AM | Reply

"Let us know when that actually bothers you." - #19 | Posted by eberly at 2018-01-12 11:53 AM

It doesn't.

Apparently, though, it bothers Sheeple.

You're welcome, eb.

#20 | Posted by Hans at 2018-01-12 11:56 AM | Reply

LOL

#21 | Posted by eberly at 2018-01-12 11:58 AM | Reply

"LOL" - #21 | Posted by eberly at 2018-01-12 11:58 AM

Always leave 'em with a smile, I always say.

#22 | Posted by Hans at 2018-01-12 11:59 AM | Reply

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