Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Monday, December 18, 2017

By John Stoehr, Dec. 18

If Senate Republicans pass a tax overhaul Tuesday, they will have done more for the cause of democratic populism than Bernie Sanders ever did. The Republicans, indeed, will demonstrate to his followers the independent senator was wrong about the Democratic Party.

It was, is and will be the party of the working class – even if the working class, the white part, disbelieves it. Sanders represents a tiny leftist faction within the Democratic Party that quibbles endlessly with the liberal majority.

But in opposing the GOP, the party will be united on "a strong, bold, sharp-edged, and common-sense economic agenda," as Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer once said, that will cut across racial lines to create competitive coalitions in 2018, even in places like Iowa.

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According to the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center, the tax law would trigger a net loss of income for most tax-filers over time, around $370 a year for the middle 60 percent.

Without having to declare class war, the Democrats will be on solid ground in accusing the Republicans of being no friend to the middle class.

But the Democrats have no reason not to declare class war due the GOP's overreach. Operatives are already laying the groundwork. "If Democrats are worried about class war, well, the Republicans started it," said John Lapp, a veteran Democratic strategist, told McClatchy's Alex Roarty. "And bring it on."

J.B. Poersch, head of Senate Majority PAC, a super PAC aligned with Senate Democrats, added: "Democrats have a pretty simple message: Republicans have failed to defend working families both in terms of health care and in this awful tax bill. 2018 is about holding them accountable for making the promise."

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"Opportunities for the Democrats don't end with the Congress. Thirty-six governorships are in contention next year.

Before the Republicans moved to cut taxes for corporations and the very rich and making the rest of us finance them, the Democrats were fighting with themselves over which mattered more: class or race.

Now that the Republicans are so obviously serving their donors, the Democrats don't have to answer that question (for now). They can push up against the Republicans' cash-grab with a class-based message and compete, even in Iowa.

(The state's governorship is a toss up; a stunning 60 percent of Iowans disapprove of President Donald Trump's performance.)

None of this is to say Sanders is irrelevant. But it is to say the Democrats have had "a strong, bold, sharp-edged, and common-sense economic agenda" that has been part of a larger menu of pluralist democratic values.

This has been true since at least the Great Recession began and certainly since the 2011 Occupy Wall Street movement forced President Barack Obama to put inequality at the center of his 2012 re-election campaign.

In 2016, Hillary Clinton talked about jobs and economics more than anything else, even qualifying her famed "deplorables" remark by saying the other half of Trump's base does not get the services, good faith and understanding they deserve by dint of being Americans."

"A menu of pluralist democratic values can be hard to see, complex as it is, and by 2016, Bernie Sanders had taken advantage of that complexity to argue, wrongly, that Clinton and the Democratic Party stood for monied interests. (He also took advantage of leftist-socialist resentment for having lost the economic argument in the 1990s to Clinton's husband.)

Her defeat appeared to confirm Sanders' erroneous claim, forcing even Chuck Schumer to concede, after Jon Ossoff lost Georgia's special election last June, that, OK OK fine, the party needs to "a strong, bold, sharp-edged, and common-sense economic agenda."

"Even if that were true, it doesn't matter now. The Republican tax plan is probably the peak of a long arc of inequality during which Everest-sized mountains of wealth have been redistributed upward.

In this context, Sanders will be a fading light fading faster as the Democrats assemble a coalition of Democrats, "Never-Trumpers" and disillusioned Republicans to mount a historic comeback.

A large majority believes the president did something at least unethical with Russia. A near-majority believes the president should be impeached. And fully half of Americans believes the Democrats should be in control of Congress.

Many argued during the 2016 Democratic primaries that Sanders was the future of the Democratic Party. He wasn't and isn't.

The Democratic Party was already moving in the direction he wanted it to go in while bringing along its traditional motley crew of interest groups. To his credit, Sanders saw it coming before most did and made political hay. His genius was getting us to think it was his idea."

#1 | Posted by Corky at 2017-12-18 03:52 PM | Reply

EW YORK POST – RUTH BROWN

Some Democratic senators now regret pushing accused groper Sen. Al Franken to resign, and are urging him to stay on, according to a new report.

"I think we acted prematurely, before we had all the facts," one anonymous senator told Politico. "In retrospect, I think we acted too fast."

Franken reluctantly bowed to his colleagues' demands to step down earlier this month after he was accused of sexual assault by eight women, saying he'd leave the Senate "in the coming weeks." Minnesota Lt. Gov. Tina Smith has been tapped as his replacement.

But at least four senators -- including three who initially joined the chorus demanding the handsy lawmaker step down -- now want the Minnesota pol to reconsider his planned January exit, the site reports.

#2 | Posted by Sniper at 2017-12-18 04:53 PM | Reply

#2

Another missed shot by a "sniper". Wrong thread, maybe?

#3 | Posted by Corky at 2017-12-18 05:35 PM | Reply

#2 Well there's snoops flailing and failing wildly. That was a complete waste of everyone's time.

#4 | Posted by 726 at 2017-12-18 07:47 PM | Reply

...Democrats that depend on Wall Street and other global Corporations to finance their campaigns. Donors who demand payback, unlike the general public.

#5 | Posted by bayviking at 2017-12-19 07:15 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

#5

Unilateral disarmament... always an option for the Purity Pony Riders. Dems would undermine CU and promote campaign finance reform, the GOP not so much. The third parties? Not a factor.

#6 | Posted by Corky at 2017-12-19 10:07 AM | Reply | Funny: 1

Democrats are the party of identity politics.

#7 | Posted by JeffJ at 2017-12-20 04:09 PM | Reply

"Democrats are the party of identity politics." - #7 | Posted by JeffJ at 2017-12-20 04:09 PM

This is true.

As the title of this article indicates, Democrats identify with the working class.

And that's good identity politics.

#8 | Posted by Hans at 2017-12-20 04:14 PM | Reply | Funny: 1

Democrats are the party of identity politics.
#7 | Posted by JeffJ a

Republicans are the party of --------.

#9 | Posted by truthhurts at 2017-12-20 04:34 PM | Reply

#8

Funny, clever response. I'm giving it a FF but not as an insult. I liked the comment.

#10 | Posted by JeffJ at 2017-12-20 04:38 PM | Reply

Have a Truth Hurts Donut

#11 | Posted by truthhurts at 2017-12-20 04:40 PM | Reply

Have a Truth Hurts Donut

Posted by truthhurts at 2017-12-20 04:40 PM | Reply

I'd be afraid it would have ass cancer inducing sprinkles on it. I'll pass.

#12 | Posted by LauraMohr at 2017-12-20 04:47 PM | Reply

Unfortunately the Truth Hurts Donut is inevitable!

#13 | Posted by truthhurts at 2017-12-20 04:48 PM | Reply

"As the title of this article indicates, Democrats identify with the working class."

I wish they did a better job of identifying with the working class. I mean, it's not like the GOP hasn't opened the door wide as hell for the dems to capture the working class vote.

#14 | Posted by eberly at 2017-12-20 04:53 PM | Reply

I wish they did a better job of identifying with the working class. I mean, it's not like the GOP hasn't opened the door wide as hell for the dems to capture the working class vote.

Posted by eberly at 2017-12-20 04:53 PM | Reply

Hillary never did that's why she's a two time loser.

#15 | Posted by LauraMohr at 2017-12-20 04:55 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

15

Yep. If you are the party of the working class, then maybe you should choose a candidate that the working class believes represents them.

The dems had a trust-fund baby ------- who insulted just about everyone he could to run their candidate against.

The opportunity was pretty good, IMO. Rust belt states should have gone dem but not enough did.

Maybe next time???

#16 | Posted by eberly at 2017-12-20 05:00 PM | Reply

"Before the Republicans moved to cut taxes for corporations and the very rich and making the rest of us finance them, the Democrats were fighting with themselves over which mattered more: class or race.

Now that the Republicans are so obviously serving their donors, the Democrats don't have to answer that question (for now). They can push up against the Republicans' cash-grab with a class-based message and compete, even in Iowa."

from the article

As more and more studies have shown, race resentment powered economic resentment, not the other way around. And race is harder to talk about even than class.

Now with the GOP having declared that they are the side of the corporations, and as Dem policy has never been so to that extent... not even close, they can concentrate on those voters that this tax bill borrowed money from to pay off GOP donors.

#17 | Posted by Corky at 2017-12-21 12:38 AM | Reply

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