Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Tuesday, December 12, 2017

In Alabama, an estimated 118,000 registered voters do not have a photo ID they can use to vote. Black and Latino voters are nearly twice as likely as white voters to lack such documentation. In other words, Alabama's law is nothing but a naked attempt to suppress the voting rights of people of color.

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I have to admit that the posting of this thread by AVIGDORE is a huge suprise that I totally welcome. Voter suppression, gerrymandering, other forms of election theft are how the Republicans are holding America hostage and the sooner most Americans recognize it the better. They own the major media, they have eliminated progressive talk radio even when it cost them huge numbers of listeners, now Ajit Pai is going to give them the final victory by ending net neutrality. We are very quickly becoming a Fascist nation whether you're ready to accept that fact or not. I don't care if you are liberal or conservative, the Fascists are taking over our nation and we all should be ready to fight them.

#1 | Posted by danni at 2017-12-12 09:04 AM | Reply

"Black and Latino voters are nearly twice as likely as white voters to lack such documentation."

Elderly are more likely than average as well.

All three groups skew (D).

#2 | Posted by Danforth at 2017-12-12 09:15 AM | Reply

This thread posted by the same person who claimed there is no racism in Georgia. Schizophrenic much?

#3 | Posted by danni at 2017-12-12 09:38 AM | Reply

Reviewing what I wrote in the article you're talking about lead me to believe that someone could read that I claimed that there was no racism in GA. That wasn't my intention, and I addressed it in that article.

#4 | Posted by Avigdore at 2017-12-12 10:00 AM | Reply | Funny: 1 | Newsworthy 1

Yesterday I took my son to get his license. It took 30 mins.

We are black. I wonder why it wasn't so difficult for us?

If we can do it, anyone can.

#5 | Posted by boaz at 2017-12-12 10:14 AM | Reply | Funny: 1

"We are black. I wonder why it wasn't so difficult for us? "

Because your son was born in a hospital, in the civil rights era.

Now imagine his great-grandmother, born via a rural midwife, never getting a birth certificate. What is the paperwork required? Does it have to be notarized? Are there fees? Is travel required?

Let's say paperwork is needed, notarized, for fees, and you have to travel into the office like you did, but as a 90 yr-old. A 90 yr-old, btw, who is expected to pay her taxes dutifully.

How long would it have taken you?

#6 | Posted by Danforth at 2017-12-12 10:30 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

"Black and Latino voters are nearly twice as likely as white voters to lack such documentation. In other words, Alabama's law is nothing but a naked attempt to suppress the voting rights of people of color."

Black and Aboriginal American voters are more likely to be below the poverty line. So it's about suppressing the vote of the poor. Bugger off with the racist race baiting.

#7 | Posted by sentinel at 2017-12-12 11:42 AM | Reply

#7 "Black and Aboriginal American voters are more likely to be below the poverty line. So it's about suppressing the vote of the poor. Bugger off with the racist race baiting."

Nope:

Don't Blame Black Voters If Roy Moore Wins. Blame Alabama's Secretary of State.

In recent years, Alabama Republicans have taken steps to protect their grip on power by making it harder for African Americans and Latinos to vote. They passed a law requiring voters to show a government-issued photo ID, a measure that has been found to disproportionately disenfranchise African Americans and Latinos, who are more likely to lack such an ID and face impediments to getting one. The ID law also applied to absentee voting, which is used by many elderly black voters in rural counties, who now must mail in copies of their photo IDs with their ballots. (The NAACP Legal Defense Fund is challenging the law in federal court as intentionally discriminatory.) They reformed campaign finance laws to weaken the political organizations that mobilize African American voters. They closed 31 DMV offices across the state, disproportionately affecting rural majority-black counties. In every county in which African Americans made up more than 75 percent of registered voters, the local DMV was slated for closure. (After a federal civil rights investigation, Alabama agreed to increase DMV service in rural African American counties, partially reversing the closures.) Since the US Supreme Court gutted the Voting Rights Act in 2013, allowing states like Alabama to change voting procedures without federal approval, Alabama has closed about 200 voting precincts, creating longer lines and sowing confusion among voters.

"Alabama's definitely in the forefront of voter suppression efforts," says John Zippert, the head of the New South Coalition, a black political organization that seeks to mobilize African American voters. The spate of new laws has "definitely hurt us," he says.

www.motherjones.com

#8 | Posted by Gal_Tuesday at 2017-12-12 11:56 AM | Reply

#7 To be fair, the poor and elderly are also targeted along with minorities, but minorities are twice as likely as whites to lack the proper ID:

There Are Huge Obstacles To Casting A Ballot In Alabama's Special Election

The state offers free IDs to anyone who needs one, but civil rights groups say the law discriminates against people of color, the poor and the elderly, who are less likely to have an acceptable form of ID. The NAACP Legal Defense Fund sued the state over the law in 2015.

Deuel Ross, an NAACP LDF lawyer involved in the voter ID suit, said his organization estimates black voters in Alabama are twice as likely to lack an acceptable form of ID as their white counterparts. In total, Ross said, the group estimates 118,000 people in Alabama don't have an acceptable form of ID to be able to vote.

www.huffingtonpost.com

#9 | Posted by Gal_Tuesday at 2017-12-12 12:05 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

We are black. I wonder why it wasn't so difficult for us?
If we can do it, anyone can.

#5 | POSTED BY BOAZ

You have resources obviously. Are you so oblivious to reality that you really think everyone has the exact same resources and life issues that you have?

It is obvious that if you make it easy to vote more people will vote. If more people vote then lunatics like Moore always lose.

#10 | Posted by donnerboy at 2017-12-12 12:37 PM | Reply

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Racial make-up of Alabama
65.8% white non-Hispanic
26.8% black or AA
4.2% Hispanic

There are more than twice as many whites as black & Hispanic combined. Let us assume that Hispanics have the same likelihood as blacks of not having the appropriate ID. If, as article states, minorities are twice as likely as whites to not have the appropriate ID, then more whites than minorities will be unable to cast a vote due to lack of ID.

Someone check my numbers on that, please?

#11 | Posted by Avigdore at 2017-12-12 01:01 PM | Reply

"You have resources obviously." - #10 | Posted by donnerboy at 2017-12-12 12:37 PM

And pfc. boazo's resources are subsidized by the US taxpayer.

Something he never seems to mention.

#12 | Posted by Hans at 2017-12-12 01:11 PM | Reply

"Let us assume that Hispanics have the same likelihood as blacks of not having the appropriate ID."

Let's not. Historically, there are macro pressures: a larger percentage of blacks may be reliant on public transportation, and never get a driver's license. Hispanics who don't speak English may not be reached.

"Someone check my numbers on that, please?"

What's the variable on whether an elderly white person or a elderly black person was born in a rural hospital, and therefore had a better or worse chance of a birth certificate? And what are the fees associated with acquiring the necessary paperwork if none exists?

#13 | Posted by Danforth at 2017-12-12 01:16 PM | Reply

I hate to agree with the haters, but, seriously, there is no reason for people not having an ID of some form. Forget all the big brother arguments, you have to have an ID to do all kinds of things related to the government, especially in the area of public services.

I don't know about other states but in this state the ID craze is not to keep black people from voting, it's to keep illegal immigrants from voting. A fix for a problem that did not exist.

#14 | Posted by kudzu at 2017-12-12 01:20 PM | Reply

"...there is no reason for people not having an ID of some form." - #14 | Posted by kudzu at 2017-12-12 01:20 PM

With no photo IDs, nuns denied ballots in Indiana
"...the ID craze is not to keep black people from voting, it's to keep illegal immigrants from voting. A fix for a problem that did not exist. With the added benefit of making it harder for black people to vote."

Thought you might have missed something, so I added it in.

#15 | Posted by Hans at 2017-12-12 01:29 PM | Reply | Funny: 1 | Newsworthy 1


And pfc. boazo's resources are subsidized by the US taxpayer.

Something he never seems to mention.

#12 | Posted by Hans

And you seem to be too stupid to understand the difference between working and welfare.

But I understand, you are an idiot troll.

#16 | Posted by boaz at 2017-12-12 01:51 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

It's really stupid to think people don't have an id in today's society. I honestly don't believe it. And to think, the pool of people this affects has to be very small. You almost cant do anything without some form of ID.

#17 | Posted by boaz at 2017-12-12 01:53 PM | Reply | Funny: 2

Voter suppression is like police brutality, in that both are real problems, but some seem to think it's only a problem if it disproportionately affects certain racial and ethnic groups. Otherwise, it sounds like they're perfectly okay with it.

#18 | Posted by sentinel at 2017-12-12 01:54 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

"And you seem to be too stupid to understand the difference between working and welfare." - #16 | Posted by pfc. boazo at 2017-12-12 01:51 PM

Oh, I understand the difference, pfc. boazo.

A paycheck comes from working.

What you receive are taxpayer-subsidized checks.

You know, welfare, pfc. boazo.

#19 | Posted by Hans at 2017-12-12 01:59 PM | Reply

"...the pool of people this affects has to be very small." - #17 | Posted by pfc. boazo at 2017-12-12 01:53 PM

So, American rights (or the denial of same) are based solely on population size.

An unsurprising admission from pfc. boazo.

#20 | Posted by Hans at 2017-12-12 02:01 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

"I don't know about other states but in this state the ID craze is not to keep black people from voting, it's to keep illegal immigrants from voting. A fix for a problem that did not exist."

That's the excuse that allows them to keep black people from voting not the real reason.

#21 | Posted by danni at 2017-12-12 02:09 PM | Reply

"seriously, there is no reason for people not having an ID of some form"

Seriously, you've never cared for an elderly person. My late MIL hadn't had a state-issued photo ID since her DL had expired 10 years before I met her, due to her macular degeneration. In the 8 years she lived with us I never saw a birth certificate. God help people like her if they had to do the legwork to get an ID by themselves.

And through all this, she was still expected to file and pay her income taxes.

#22 | Posted by Danforth at 2017-12-12 02:11 PM | Reply

Historically, there are macro pressures: a larger percentage of blacks may be reliant on public transportation, and never get a driver's license. Hispanics who don't speak English may not be reached. - #13 | Posted by Danforth at 2017-12-12 01:16 PM
If Hispanic rates without ID aren't as high as blacks, that would lead to a higher number of whites affected, not a lower number.
If Hispanic rates without ID are Higher than those of blacks, I have no doubt that the media would have included that fact in the article.

What's the variable on whether an elderly white person or a elderly black person was born in a rural hospital, and therefore had a better or worse chance of a birth certificate? And what are the fees associated with acquiring the necessary paperwork if none exists? - #13 | Posted by Danforth at 2017-12-12 01:16 PM

The same links above show that the AA birthrate has exceeded the white-non Hispanic birthrate for decades. That means that there will more likely be a higher percentage of younger AAs and a higher % of older whites. So the white as a % of the elderly is higher than the white % of the whole. If the elderly are more affected by this, it would again lead to a higher number of whites in the affected column.

#23 | Posted by Avigdore at 2017-12-12 02:24 PM | Reply

some seem to think it's only a problem if it disproportionately affects certain racial and ethnic groups. Otherwise, it sounds like they're perfectly okay with it.

#18 | POSTED BY SENTINEL AT 2017-12-12 01:54 PM | REPLY | FLAG:

And why not?

#24 | Posted by BruceBanner at 2017-12-12 05:42 PM | Reply

Roll tide.

Moore is going down.

#25 | Posted by ichiro at 2017-12-12 08:36 PM | Reply

"If the elderly are more affected by this, it would again lead to a higher number of whites in the affected column."

You've completely avoided the propensity of elderly blacks to lack a birth certificate.

#26 | Posted by Danforth at 2017-12-13 11:14 AM | Reply

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