Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Sunday, December 03, 2017

James Winnefeld, The Atlantic: The last photograph of my son Jonathan was taken at the end of a new-student barbecue on the campus green at the University of Denver. It was one of those bittersweet transitional moments. We were feeling the combination of apprehension and optimism that every parent feels when dropping off a kid at college for the first time, which was amplified by the fact that we were coming off a rocky 16 months with our son. We had moved him into his dormitory room only that morning. I remember how sharp he looked in the outfit he had selected, and his eagerness to start class and make new friends. We were happy, relieved, and, knowing what we thought he had overcome, proud. At lunch, I asked Jonathan whether he thought he was ready for the coming school year. "Dad, I can handle it as long as I continue my recovery," he said. "Everything flows from that." Only three days later, Jonathan was found unresponsive in his dormitory-room bed, one of several victims of a fentanyl-laden batch of heroin that had spread through the Denver area that week.

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Every parent doesn't move their "recovering" son into his dormitory room that they're paying for. He probably needed to do his own homework.

#1 | Posted by bayviking at 2017-12-03 10:10 PM | Reply

Drug overdose, like the one that took Jonathan from us, is now the leading cause of death for Americans younger than 50 years old. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that more than 64,000 Americans lost their life to a drug overdose in 2016, including 15,446 heroin overdoses.

What a harrowing late night read. My compassion and condolences go out to the parents. :(

#2 | Posted by GOnoles92 at 2017-12-03 10:10 PM | Reply

Horrible. Someone offered me heroin at a party once. I looked at him like he had asked me if I wanted to jump out the window into oncoming traffic. I don't get why more people haven't gotten the word. Um, heroin is bad.

#3 | Posted by cbob at 2017-12-03 10:34 PM | Reply

I'm not trying to make light of addictions or depression or what have you. But smack? Junk? Hell no, man.

#4 | Posted by cbob at 2017-12-03 10:35 PM | Reply

Nothing can be done.
Thoughts and prayers.

#5 | Posted by bored at 2017-12-03 11:21 PM | Reply

There is a myth that life can be lived pain free. Every cure has a cost. The reason smack has come back into vogue is practical, it is cheaper than buying pills. An oxy cost about 10 bucks a pill, you can get a nickel bag of tar heroin for about 50 bucks. Ether can kill you.

#6 | Posted by docnjo at 2017-12-04 12:23 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

As Doctors are forced to tighten up on prescriptions for pain killers, more are turning to the street drugs.

both can kill you.

#7 | Posted by lfthndthrds at 2017-12-04 09:40 AM | Reply

There is a myth that life can be lived pain free. Every cure has a cost. The reason smack has come back into vogue is practical, it is cheaper than buying pills. An oxy cost about 10 bucks a pill, you can get a nickel bag of tar heroin for about 50 bucks. Ether can kill you.

#6 | Posted by docnjo

Yeah you get hooked on heroin that big pharma is allowed to over prescribe because they bribe politicians, then move to heroin that is cheaper because of dubya's invasion of Afghanistan.

#8 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2017-12-04 11:17 AM | Reply

More research needs to be done to find out what the difference is between people who can control their urges and those who can't. There is something in our DNA that makes this possible and there has to be a way to pinpoint this. I've done many drugs and most of them were once or they were only done on special occasions. After a night of doing opium, I didn't do it again for years. It was awesome, I loved it, but I don't see anything as something I have to do over and over again just because it's fun to do or gives good feelings. It's sad that so many people have issues with just controlling their own actions and stories like this are heartbreaking.

#9 | Posted by humtake at 2017-12-04 11:50 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

More research needs to be done to find out what the difference is between people who can control their urges and those who can't. There is something in our DNA that makes this possible and there has to be a way to pinpoint this. I've done many drugs and most of them were once or they were only done on special occasions. After a night of doing opium, I didn't do it again for years. It was awesome, I loved it, but I don't see anything as something I have to do over and over again just because it's fun to do or gives good feelings. It's sad that so many people have issues with just controlling their own actions and stories like this are heartbreaking.

#9 | Posted by humtake

On huge data point is childhood trauma.

It's becoming clear that trauma during childhood is a common factor in people who become addicts of any kind later in life.

www.thefix.com

So all the preachy "i tried drugs and didnt get addicted like all those weak willed addicts" people are really just bragging about their own sheltered childhoods.

#10 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2017-12-04 01:26 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

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On huge data point is childhood trauma.

It's becoming clear that trauma during childhood is a common factor in people who become addicts of any kind later in life.

#10 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2017-12-04 01:26 PMFlag: ReceivedFunnyNewsworthy

You make a very good point. My father left me and my mother when I was a 1-2 years old. So young that I never had a recollection of him until I met him in my teens. Even though A really good man came along and adopted me and gave me an awesome childhood, there was still something very wrong. I remember at a young age sneaking alcohol and then experimenting with other drugs for apparently no good reason. Luckily I was able to steer through all that with minimal consequences, but I've known others that weren't so lucky. My youngest sister is a severe alcoholic and in inpatient rehab as I type this. She was sexually abused as a child and never said anything all those years. Now, our parents are deceased as of last year and she has fallen completely apart.

#11 | Posted by lfthndthrds at 2017-12-04 01:53 PM | Reply

#11 | Posted by lfthndthrds

Sorry to hear all of that. Life really isn't fair to many people.
WHich is why it's so infuriating to hear heartless conservatives say that anyone who isn't successful is simply lazy and undeserving of sympathy or assistance.

#12 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2017-12-04 02:19 PM | Reply

" conservatives say that anyone who isn't successful is simply lazy and undeserving of sympathy or assistance"

Its easier for people who say that type of stuff to discount an actual problem than to roll up their sleeves and contribute (in some way) to those who are less fortunate.

#13 | Posted by lfthndthrds at 2017-12-04 03:36 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

raise a pint..twist one up..toast a bowl..tie it tight for all those who searched until they found it. maybe
they just didn't give a ---

#14 | Posted by ABlock at 2017-12-05 12:18 AM | Reply

Oh, so now that it affects middle-class white people it's a HEALTH problem. For at least two generations of inner-city black people it was a CRIMINAL problem. The country didn't give a damn about their health.

#15 | Posted by WhoDaMan at 2017-12-06 11:42 AM | Reply

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