Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Monday, November 27, 2017

The first and third incarnations of the Klan -- the cross-burning lynch mobs and the vigilantes who beat up and murdered civil rights workers in the 1960s -- seem beyond the pale of today's politics, at least for the moment. But the second Klan, the Klan of the 1920s, less violent but far more widespread, is a different story, and one that offers some chilling comparisons to the present day. It embodied the same racism at its core but served it up beneath a deceptively benign façade, in all-American patriotic colors.

In other ways as well, the Klan of the 1920s strongly echoes the world of Donald Trump. This Klan was a movement, but also a profit-making business. On economic issues, it took a few mildly populist stands. It was heavily supported by evangelicals. It was deeply hostile to science and trafficked in false assertions. And it was masterfully guided by a team of public relations advisers as skillful as any political consultants today.

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In all three of its historical incarnations, the KKK had many allies, not all of whom wanted to dress up in pointed hoods and hold ceremonies at night. But such public actions always have an echo. "The Klan did not invent bigotry," Linda Gordon writes, " ... [but] making its open expression acceptable has significant additional impact." Those burning crosses legitimated the expression of hatred, and exactly the same can be said of presidential tweets today.

She ends her book by writing, "The Klannish spirit -- fearful, angry, gullible to sensationalist falsehoods, in thrall to demagogic leaders and abusive language, hostile to science and intellectuals, committed to the dream that everyone can be a success in business if they only try -- lives on." One intriguing episode links the Klan of ninety years ago to us now. On Memorial Day 1927, a march of some one thousand Klansmen through the Jamaica neighborhood of Queens, New York, turned into a brawl with the police. Several people wearing Klan hoods, either marching in the parade or sympathizers cheering from the sidelines, were charged with disorderly conduct, and one with "refusing to disperse." Although the charge against the latter was later dropped, his name was mentioned in several newspaper accounts of the fracas. Beneath the hood was Fred Trump, the father of Donald.*

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Of interest: Mike Pearl, "All the Evidence We Could Find About Fred Trump's Alleged Involvement with the KKK" at www.vice.com

#1 | Posted by Doc_Sarvis at 2017-11-27 08:08 AM | Reply

The hoods are off in Trump's Amerika.

#2 | Posted by Corky at 2017-11-27 11:58 AM | Reply

Here's an actual video of a Klan clambake - youtu.be

#3 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2017-11-27 06:56 PM | Reply

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