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Thursday, November 23, 2017

National Sardines Day is observed annually on November 24.

The sardine canning industry peaked in the United States in the 1950s. After the industry's peak, it has been on the decline. The Stinson Seafood plant in Prospect Harbor, Maine, which was the last large sardine cannery in the United States, closed its doors on April 15, 2010, after 135 years in operation.

Sardines are several types of small, oily fish, related to herrings. Most commonly served in cans, fresh sardines are also often grilled, pickled or smoked. When canned, they can be packed in water, olive, sunflower or soybean oil or tomato, chili or mustard sauce.

The term sardine was first used in English during the beginning of the 15th century, possibly coming from the Mediterranean island of Sardinia where there was an abundance of sardines.

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Per the link ...

Sardines are a great source of vitamins and minerals.
From one's daily vitamin allowance containing:

• 13% B2
• .25% niacin
• 150% vitamin B12
• phosphorus
• calcium
• potassium
• iron
• selenium
• omega-3 fatty acids
• vitamin D
• protein

– B vitamins are important in helping to support proper nervous system function and are used for energy metabolism.

– Omega 3 fatty acids reduce the occurrence of cardiovascular disease and regular consumption may reduce the likelihood of developing Alzheimer's disease and can even boost brain function as well as help lower blood sugar levels.

Relative to other fish commonly eaten by humans, sardines are very low in contaminants, such as mercury.


Want to make the world a better place? Eat sardines.

#1 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2017-11-23 04:08 PM | Reply

I would eat them......but only in a survival situation😆

#2 | Posted by MSgt at 2017-11-23 04:34 PM | Reply

The "squadron" of birds dive bombing the sardine swarm in video #1 is pretty damn cool.

#3 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2017-11-23 04:35 PM | Reply

I would eat them......but only in a survival situation😆

#2 | POSTED BY MSGT

From one MSgt to another, get tough ;-)

If you find it hard to find a brand that's easy on the eyes, the taste buds, and the nose (smell), try Reese Smoked Sardines in olive oil ... images.prod.meredith.com

#4 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2017-11-23 04:43 PM | Reply

Sardines in tomato sauce.
bread
mayo
pepper

#5 | Posted by LauraMohr at 2017-11-23 04:48 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Reese Golden Smoked Sardines
pumpernickel bread (lightly toasted)
mayo
avocado (mashed into the mayo)
thinly sliced onion
tomato

#6 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2017-11-23 04:53 PM | Reply

Trader Joe Sardines in Harissa
fork
pie hole

#7 | Posted by Whizzo at 2017-11-23 06:01 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

I miss the days when you had to use a key to open cans of sardines.

#8 | Posted by LauraMohr at 2017-11-23 06:26 PM | Reply

#8
Yeah, it added a lot to the dining experience.

#9 | Posted by Whizzo at 2017-11-23 07:24 PM | Reply

Not sure if having to use a key to plop open a can of sardines after a long day of drinking beer is good, let alone safe ...

Knowing me, I'd drunk fumble the the key then end up in the ER after slicing my hand when trying to pry open the can of sardines with the big butcher knife.

#10 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2017-11-23 07:41 PM | Reply

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#4 | POSTED BY PINCHALOAF AT 2017-11-23 04:43 PM | FLAG: Nah, my idea of good seafood is steamed shrimp dipped in cocktail sauce and 'chased' with a good white wine.

#11 | Posted by MSgt at 2017-11-23 11:50 PM | Reply

Pinchaloaf, I've mentioned this before, but I figured it'd be an opportune time to mention it again. I love(d) sardines, but they gave me gout. I was eating them for the health benefit, until I woke up in the middle of the night about 10 years ago with my ankle swollen and burning with electrical pain unlike I've ever felt before. I thought I'd broken my ankle earlier in the day or something. I literally started screaming from the pain, so I was loaded up in the car and was driven to the ER. I hopped into the waiting room and only a shred of pride remained keeping me from screaming at the top of my lungs. They took X-rays and a urinalysis and told me I had gout, and showed me the uric acid crystals all in my left ankle bones.

It took a couple years to pin-down the culprit, and it was the sardines, with their extremely high purine content that were precipitating the gout attacks. That, and I'd inherited the malady from my mother's mother.

Anyway, if you ever have excruciating shooting pains in your feet or ankles in the middle of the night that come on suddenly, you'll know what it is. Get to the ER fast because it'll only get worse without treatment and you'll be laid-up for a couple weeks in torturous agony. Even Vicodin and morphine barely touch the pain. Most doctors prescribe colchicine in 0.6mg doses to take as an emergency gout treatment, but it's highly poisonous. But it stops the attack from progressing.

Since you're in the medical field, I suspect you know all of this already, but here's some additional information if anyone's interested:

www.acumedico.com

#12 | Posted by madscientist at 2017-11-24 09:11 AM | Reply

#12 gout , the gift that keeps on giving . You can't even explain the pain to folks who don't know. A couple of years ago I was exposed to black mold that lowered my resistance., both knees and both ankles, 6 weeks. Wished I could go to sleep and die.

All the things you love to eat, well you can't have them no more.

#13 | Posted by bruceaz at 2017-11-24 09:28 AM | Reply

In my 30's I took a spill and broke my feet , so gout never occurred to me or my doctors when I had reoccurring bouts of severe pain and swelling over the years . And I went to " specialists".

Rich mans disease, guess I'm a one percenter lol.

#14 | Posted by bruceaz at 2017-11-24 09:39 AM | Reply

Never ate a single sardine and probably never will.

#15 | Posted by danni at 2017-11-24 10:09 AM | Reply

Well Danni you're missing out. If you're a hiker it's a real treat. I like mine with mustard.

#16 | Posted by bruceaz at 2017-11-24 10:12 AM | Reply

And they aren't the sole cause of gout. I miss mussels and crab so bad.

Your body makes purines all by itself, some folks can't tolerate extra. But a little extra calcium from a sardine ,osteoporosis ain't your friend.

#17 | Posted by bruceaz at 2017-11-24 10:20 AM | Reply

Yep BruceAZ...sardines and tiny herring fish "steaks" in mustard or Louisiana Hot Sauce were my favorite. Every once in a while, when I'm positive my uric acid levels are low from abstaining from meat for a several days, I'll still sneak a can in a couple times a year. Had to change from a meat-based chicken and Budweiser diet to beans, nuts, fruits, grains, and vegetables. Then my A1C went up from all the carbohydrates. You can't win. LOL. Haven't had a gout attack in a while, but they used to happen once a month until I figured out it was the seafood doing it.

#18 | Posted by madscientist at 2017-11-24 12:36 PM | Reply

Since you're in the medical field, I suspect you know all of this already, but here's some additional information if anyone's interested:

www.acumedico.com

#12 | POSTED BY MADSCIENTIST

Actually, I didn't know much about gout.

This past July I ended up in the ER because my foot swelled up, then my knee. I thought for damn sure it was gout, but the pain was more of a dull ache ... I was burning up the googlez looking into the ramifications of having gout and was bumming myself out at the thought of no longer eating sardines or drinking beers (plural, with an "s") ... in the meantime I learned all about purines and which foods were high in them.

The synovial fluid in my knee was tested for gout and it came back negative.

My primary care doctor speculated that I either had an infection (my WBC was high) or I was suffering from Rheumatoid Arthritis. Since then, things have calmed down and my blood work is near normal -- I count myself as lucky.

I'm sorry to hear of your gout attacks. After reading up on gout during my problems with my foot and knee, I wouldn't wish gout on anyone.

#19 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2017-11-25 04:38 PM | Reply

Never ate a single sardine and probably never will.

#15 | POSTED BY DANNI

Try this ...

cooking.nytimes.com

SPINACH AND SARDINE SANDWICH

2 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil

1 small garlic clove, minced

2 ounces baby spinach 2 cups tightly packed, rinsed

Salt, freshly ground pepper

1 small (3 1/2-inch) whole-wheat English muffin, lightly toasted

Dijon mustard (optional)

2 canned sardines, preferably lightly smoked in olive oil about 2 ounces, filleted

1 small tomato, sliced optional

Lemon juice

About 1 teaspoon mayonnaise

STEP 1

Heat the olive oil in a medium skillet over medium heat, and add the garlic. Cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the spinach. Turn up the heat, and wilt the spinach in the water left on the leaves after washing. Season with salt and pepper, and remove from the heat. Drain and press out excess water.

STEP 2

Lightly toast the English muffin. Spread a little mustard if desired over the bottom half and top with the spinach. Lay the sardine fillets over the spinach, and douse with a little lemon juice. If you have a nice ripe in season tomato, lay over the sardines. Spread the top half of the English muffin with mayonnaise, and top the sandwich. Press down and cut in half, or wrap and refrigerate until ready to eat.


Tasty goodness ... and your body, your blood cholesterol levels, and the planet will all thank you ~

#20 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2017-11-25 04:49 PM | Reply

Sardines are trendy. Here's how to turn them into a meal -- Inexpensive yet rich in healthy Omega-3 fatty acids, canned sardines are having a moment.

www.bostonglobe.com

I am that guy.

The one who will stand over the sink, eating sardines right out of the can, on crackers, with just a squeeze of lemon.

And you know what? When that's my lunch or dinner (or sometimes breakfast), I don't feel like a sad sack, but rather, healthy and happy: Sardines are protein-heavy, low-calorie, and especially rich in beneficial omega-3 fatty acids, and they're delicious.

And to top it off, they're inexpensive.

More and more people are coming to agree with me, as canned sardines start to get the love they deserve.


QFT

#21 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2017-11-25 05:01 PM | Reply

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