Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Thursday, November 23, 2017

During a May 10 meeting in the Oval Office, the president betrayed his intelligence community by leaking the content of a classified, and highly sensitive, Israeli intelligence operation to two high-ranking Russian envoys, Sergey Kislyak and Sergey Lavrov. This is what he told them -- and the ramifications.

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"I get great intel," the president suddenly boasted, as prideful as if he were bragging about the amenities at one of his company's hotels. "I have people brief me on great intel every day."

He quickly went on to share with representatives of a foreign adversary not only the broad outlines of the plot to turn laptop computers into airborne bombs but also at least one highly classified operational detail -- the sort of sensitive, locked-in-the-vault intel that was not shared with even Congress or friendly governments. The president did not name the U.S. partner who had spearheaded the operation. (Journalists, immediately all over the astonishing story, would soon out Israel). But, more problematic, President Trump cavalierly identified the specific city in ISIS-held territory where the threat had been detected.

As for the two Russians, there's no record of their response. Their silence would be understandable: why interrupt the flow of information? But in their minds, no doubt they were already drafting the cable they'd send to the Kremlin detailing their great espionage coup.

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"So why? Why did a president who has time after volatile time railed against leakers, who has attacked Hillary Clinton for playing fast and loose with classified information, cozy up to a couple of Russian bigwigs in the Oval Office and breezily offer government secrets?"

Any answer is at best conjecture. Yet in the search for an important truth, consider these hypotheses, each of which has its own supporters among past and current members of the U.S. intelligence community.

The first is a bit of armchair psychology. In Trump's irrepressible way of living in the world, wealth is real only if other people believe you're rich. If you don't flaunt it, then you might as well not have it.

So there is the new president, shaky as any bounder might be in the complicated world of international politics, sitting down to a head-to-head with a pair of experienced Russians. How can he impress them? Get them to appreciate that he's not some lightweight, but rather a genuine player on the world stage?

There's also the school of thought that the episode is another unfortunate example of Trump's impressionable worldview being routinely shaped by the last thing he's heard, be it that morning's broadcast of Fox & Friends or an intelligence briefing in the Oval Office. As advocates of this theory point out, the president was likely told that one of the issues still on his guests' minds would be the terrorist explosion back in October 2015 that brought down a Russian passenger plane flying above Egypt's Sinai Peninsula, killing all 224 people on board. With that seed planted in the president's undisciplined mind, it's a short leap for him to be off and running to the Russians about what he knew about an ISIS scheme to target passenger aircraft.

Yet there is also a more sinister way to connect all the dots. There are some petulant voices in official Washington who insist that the president's treachery was deliberate, part of his longtime collaboration with the Russians. It is a true believer's orthodoxy, one which predicts that the meeting will wind up being one more damning count in an indictment that Robert Mueller, the special counsel, will ultimately nail to the White House door.

But, for now, to bolster their still very circumstantial case, they point to a curiosity surrounding the meeting in the Oval Office -- U.S. journalists were kept out. And, no less an oddity, the Russian press was allowed in. It was the photographer from TASS, the state-run Russian news agency, who snapped the only shots that documented the occasion for posterity. Or, for that matter, for the grand jury.

#1 | Posted by Doc_Sarvis at 2017-11-23 08:42 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

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