Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Saturday, November 11, 2017

Andrew Cotton, 36, suffered the worst injury of his professional career in the mountainous seas off Nazare in Portugal, where waves can reach almost 80 feet. The big wave surfer was thrown from his board and slammed back-first into the water at high speed. He is now recovering in a Portuguese hospital and already planning his return to the region after being given a good prognosis by doctors. Posting a video on Instagram of the wipeout as he attempted to surf the wave estimated to have been 50-feet high, Cotton wrote: "What can I say, I got a little excited this morning and ending up having possibly the worst wipe-out impact wise of my life."

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That wave spit him out like a ragdoll.

#1 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2017-11-09 11:04 PM | Reply

Jesus, look at that wave.

#2 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2017-11-10 01:29 AM | Reply

Try to wrap your head around the fact that Jeff Clark, who discovered Mavericks in Half Moon Bay, surfed it alone for 15 years...

#3 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2017-11-10 02:43 PM | Reply

The Mavericks break way offshore, making them safer. From the HMB shoreline cliffs they look much tamer than these Portuguese monsters.

#4 | Posted by bayviking at 2017-11-11 07:58 AM | Reply

#4

They are not safer or tamer, I am not good enough to surf them but have been out there on a support boat.

For the uninitiated, a 50 ft wave means a 100 foot face, which is terrifying even in a boat a couple of hundred yards away. Mavericks can pump out 70 foot waves during the winter.

And Jeff Clark surfed them ALONE. Gnarly in every sense of the word.

#5 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2017-11-11 09:49 AM | Reply

50 foot wave, terrifying anywhere, YES. But, this guy hit the sandy shore with the full force of the wave. Very different than tumbling in open water. Rocks and coral reefs are even more dangerous.

#6 | Posted by bayviking at 2017-11-11 10:00 AM | Reply

He didn't hit the shore... that was still "deep" water.

#7 | Posted by GalaxiePete at 2017-11-11 11:12 AM | Reply

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