Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Sunday, November 05, 2017

After a prolonged stretch of explosive growth, fueled by interest from Wall Street, experts say there are now too many fast-food, casual and other chain restaurants. Since the early 2000s, banks, private equity firms and other financial institutions have poured billions into the restaurant industry as they sought out more tangible enterprises than the dot-com start-ups that were going belly-up. There are now more than 620,000 eating and drinking places in the United States, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and the number of restaurants is growing at about twice the rate of the population.

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"Year over year, we are seeing chain restaurants grow at twice the rate of overall population growth," said [Victor] Fernandez, the TDn2K analyst. "We believe now there are probably too many restaurants and too many brands."

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U.S. Has Too Many Chain Restaurants

Agree -- too many Papa Johns, and even too many Pizza Huts.

More local bbq joints FTW.

#1 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2017-11-05 09:55 AM | Reply

And if, you don't love me now
You will never love me again
I can still hear you saying
You would never break the chain.

--Fleetwood "Big" Mac w/Special Sauce; feat. Lettuce, Cheese, Pickles, Onions; from the album On a Sesame Seed Bun.

#2 | Posted by madscientist at 2017-11-05 10:02 AM | Reply | Funny: 1

Each privately owned restaurant or,for that matter, other type of store provides a middle class life to a family. Each chain restaurant provides a manager a paltry similarity. Corporate America is destroying the fabric of America.

#3 | Posted by danni at 2017-11-05 10:03 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 6

With the exception of the occasional fast food visit (maybe once a month, I haven't entered a chain restaurant for any reason other than to repair plumbing. I will admit, tho, that last time I was in a Red Lobster, the cheddar "biscuits" had just come out of the oven and the cook offered me one...it was pretty tasty.

#4 | Posted by Angrydad at 2017-11-05 11:44 AM | Reply

I will admit, tho, that last time I was in a Red Lobster, the cheddar "biscuits" had just come out of the oven and the cook offered me one...it was pretty tasty.

#4 | POSTED BY ANGRYDAD

Stick it to The Man by eating a free corporate biscuit !!!

Where do I sign up?

#5 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2017-11-05 12:26 PM | Reply

The one thing that astonished me most about America after I became an OTR (over-the-road) trucker, almost 30 years ago was the sameness in all the U.S. towns. Not just in restaurants, but the Home Depots, Lowe's, supermarket chains , motels/hotels chains, Auto repair shops, Auto parts stores,Walmarts, Kmarts, Targets, Banks etc. the list goes on and on.

I live in Las Cruces, NM(100,000 pop.)which is just a backwater place in America, but our town is literally inundated with these chain outlets/stores.

And I confess I have mixed emotions because the goods and services offered by some of these companies are excellent, but like Danni said, most of the jobs with these companies are usually minimum wage and/or maybe at best, some local people being made asst. managers with moderate salaries.

The bulk of the millions of dollars generated goes to Corporate coffers thousands of miles away. It's like were Plantations.

#6 | Posted by shane at 2017-11-05 01:14 PM | Reply

The best of the best, Indian and Thai, are all independent entrepreneurs. Another plus, heart disease, is virtually non-existent in Asia, at least until US fast food moved in.

#7 | Posted by bayviking at 2017-11-05 02:05 PM | Reply

Each privately owned restaurant or,for that matter, other type of store provides a middle class life to a family. Each chain restaurant provides a manager a paltry similarity. Corporate America is destroying the fabric of America.

#3 | Posted by danni at 2017-11-05 10:03 AM | Reply | Flag:
| Newsworthy 2

Not only that, Danni, but the mom-and-pop operations are more likely to have management active in local affairs, sponsoring the Little League team, running for city council, active on the school board, and generally working to improve the quality of life of the community in which they had deep connections.

I remember years ago I was living in a small town in Kentucky with an amazingly robust downtown. Something like 80 merchants were successfully running second- and third-generation stores and restaurants in a quaint and attractive CBD. Shortly after my arrival came word of a new store called Wal-Mart buying up a piece of land on the outskirts of town. The merchants warned that the big box would kill downtown, and they quickly organized to try to stop it. But their efforts failed, of course, and the Wal-Mart opened as planned. I moved away before I could see the results.

Ten years later I went back to the small town for a visit. I drove past the Wal-Mart, whose parking lot was littered with hundreds of cars. Fast-food joints were strategically placed in proximity to the store. I proceeded to the downtown, and sure enough, it was like a ghost town. The local department store was closed. The yummy local restaurants were down to one or two, and only a handful of the other merchants were still open. Downtown was dead -- like most American small towns.

#8 | Posted by cbob at 2017-11-05 02:12 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Downtown was dead -- like most American small towns.

People want quantity over quality, hence they drive a spike in the heart of their own livings by racing to the bottom willingly.

#9 | Posted by jpw at 2017-11-05 02:21 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

Well stated, JPW. They save $80 on a TV and lose their local identity.

#10 | Posted by cbob at 2017-11-05 02:26 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

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"Not only that, Danni, but the mom-and-pop operations are more likely to have management active in local affairs, sponsoring the Little League team, running for city council, active on the school board, and generally working to improve the quality of life of the community in which they had deep connections.".

Painting with too a broad of a brush is dangerous. Case in point:

Locally, Raisin Canes Chicken comes to mind. They seem to be very community oriented. From the local kids athletic programs to the ULM War Hawks. And they are always one of the first on the scene providing food during floods and other local crises. And I know one of their store managers personally. My guess is he is bring home around $100-$150K plus bonus. And then there are the Taco Bells of the world. All they do is provide entry level jobs to people with no skills. Many of whom nobody else would hire. That in it's self has tremendous value.

#11 | Posted by bogey1355 at 2017-11-05 02:47 PM | Reply

I will concede broadbrushing, Bogey. Probably not entirely fair, and in some cases, yes, a Taco Bell might be the only option for some people.

But I think in general my point holds.

#12 | Posted by cbob at 2017-11-05 02:59 PM | Reply

Well if the Federal, State and local Government didn't regulate and tax small businesses's so much they might have a chance.

#13 | Posted by Federalist at 2017-11-05 03:02 PM | Reply | Funny: 2

"....Each chain restaurant provides a manager a paltry similarity..."

Actually many of those chain restaurants are franchises. My uncle and a partner borrowed from a bank and bought two franchises of McDonalds in the outlying Baltimore area in the latter half of the 60s. Over the years he bought out his partner and expanded to eight in total. Sold them all in his mid 50s and retired as a multi-millionaire.

McDonald's Franchising Opportunities :: McDonald's. McDonald's continues to be recognized as a premier franchising company around the world. More than 80% of our restaurants worldwide are owned and operated by our Franchisees.
McDonald's Franchising Opportunities :: McDonald's
corporate.mcdonalds.com/mcd/franchising.html

Though a 'chain' it led to his family eventually being able to afford the best schools for the children and eventually an upscale lifestyle - BUT also for most of those years he worked his butt off, usually working 60+ hour weeks to make it all work.

#14 | Posted by MSgt at 2017-11-05 04:17 PM | Reply

As an American who has lived outside the U.S. for many years, I have come to appreciate the small businesses and privately owned restaurants. Walmart is a killer to the country and the community. It has ruined the economic life of so many towns and small cities.

Living in Europe, I get to experience some really wonderfully-prepared food from real cooks that use real ingredients, and not factory-prepared frozen crap that most chains offer. Fortunately, the GMO surge has been blunted in Germany so one can be assured of not eating Frankenfoods. Come to Germany and experience real bread (no country makes the selection of bread like the Germans), beer (not only Germany but lots of other countries as well) and privately-owned restaurants. learn to live.

#15 | Posted by Londontoad at 2017-11-05 04:18 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

I'd rather have my sack caught in a printing press than eat at a corporate chainshart restaurant.

#16 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2017-11-05 10:06 PM | Reply

Just came back from Outback Steakhouse.

MMmmmmmmm-mmmmmmmmm!

That's some good eatin'!

#17 | Posted by rstybeach11 at 2017-11-06 02:44 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

They are ok if you are passing through an area where the local options look questionable (dirty) or if you are in a rush. But I don't get how they manage to survive when there is good local competition.

#18 | Posted by Sully at 2017-11-06 09:25 AM | Reply

"Though a 'chain' it led to his family eventually being able to afford the best schools for the children and eventually an upscale lifestyle - BUT also for most of those years he worked his butt off, usually working 60+ hour weeks to make it all work."

How many meals of garbage did he have to serve to accomplish that. How many of his employees worked their asses off for minimum wage? Sorry, not impressed with his accomplishment. I had an uncle who started his own restaurant, built up a huge clientele, served great "diner food" of the highest quality, also got rich enough to open several restaurants, paid his employees well and retired with his kids running his little empire. I respect him far more than any McDonalds owning fat cat.

#19 | Posted by danni at 2017-11-06 09:40 AM | Reply

On campus here there is a block that has two starbucks coffee shops and two Jimmy Johns sub shops. ON THE SAME BLOCK

#20 | Posted by hatter5183 at 2017-11-06 10:06 AM | Reply

Worked at a McDonalds as a teen [at $1.25 an hour minimum wage - got a ten cent raise after 90 days] and it was a valuable work experience. Still remember the phrase 'If you've got time to lean you've got time to clean'.

#21 | Posted by MSgt at 2017-11-06 10:09 AM | Reply

Worked at a McDonalds as a teen [at $1.25 an hour minimum wage - got a ten cent raise after 90 days] and it was a valuable work experience. Still remember the phrase 'If you've got time to lean you've got time to clean'.

#21 | POSTED BY MSGT AT 2017-11-06 10:09 AM

Then you went to job #2 which paid a little more and maybe went to school and got some skills that could get you job #3

Now job#2 and job #3 pay the same as Mcdonalds and Any better paying job requires skills you can't get working any of them.

We are asking KIDS to predict what jobs will be available in 4-6 years and take on huge debts to prepare for them and then we blame the kid when they guess wrong.

The job market is changing so rapidly it is a crap shoot whether anything you learn in school will be obsolete by the day you graduate

#22 | Posted by hatter5183 at 2017-11-06 02:47 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

#20 | POSTED BY HATTER5183

Okay, the multiple Starbucks is dumb, but Jimmy Johns is so good that having 2 is a blessing.

#23 | Posted by IndianaJones at 2017-11-06 06:59 PM | Reply

Chain restaurants are having to fake innovate now. Look at chili's trying to pivot to burger by jumping on the ridiculous plating trends.

My fries don't need to be in a fake fryer basket, just put them on the damn plate.

#24 | Posted by sitzkrieg at 2017-11-07 07:30 AM | Reply

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