Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Sunday, November 05, 2017

Store brands have been growing since the 1980s, expanding from a 10 to 15 percent market share to nearly 25 percent today. The phenomenon isn't limited to supermarkets, but extends to home improvement, office supply, and big-box stores. However, "consumers still think of store brands as a lower quality than the national brands," says Woochoel Shin, professor of marketing at the University of Florida's Warrington College of Business. ... Shin expects the proliferation of generics to continue until store shelves in the United States look more like European countries such as Switzerland, Spain, and the United Kingdom, where store brands account for 40 percent or more of sales.

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FOOL! If you want to control my mind, your eyes must spin ANTI-CLOCKWISE!

#1 | Posted by RevDarko at 2017-11-05 07:57 AM | Reply | Funny: 1

Hey, I'm no food expert but I have bought Publix brand Parmesan cheese for a while to put on my spaghetti and other Italian dishes. I developed a problem with heart burn...big time. So, just this past week I made a pot of spaghetti but did not put any Publix Parmesan cheese on it. Guess what, I ate it for three meals in a row, and no heart burn. Hmmm. Could digesting wood pulp create heart burn???? I will continue my experimentation by buying Parmesan Cheese from the deli in block form and grinding it myself but at this point in my experiment I suspect Publix Parmesan cheese has too high of a percentage of wood pulp which is indigestible by humans and thus would create severe heartburn. And all this time I blamed to tomatoes.

#2 | Posted by danni at 2017-11-05 08:06 AM | Reply

Anyone else remember the original roll out of Generic foodstuffs?
Whit boxes with black block lettering?
Corn Puffs
Wheat Crackers
Tomato Soup
and so on?

historysdumpster.blogspot.com

#3 | Posted by HanoverFist at 2017-11-05 08:47 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

#3 | Posted by HanoverFist

LOL! And the six-pack of white cans with BEER in navy blue block letters.

#4 | Posted by Angrydad at 2017-11-05 09:21 AM | Reply

Several years ago I was in California and dropped into a Vons Supermarket. Most surprising: an entire aisle of generic booze for $5 a fifth...at 3am on a Sunday. God bless California.

For the discriminating alcoholic on a budget

#5 | Posted by madscientist at 2017-11-05 09:32 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

Because we're on an extremely limited food budget, my household buys rice, dried legumes, and pasta in bulk. We have the advertisements for ALL the major grocery stores in our Email, we always know the prices of everything we need. For example, we like our diet sodas, so we watch for specials om bulk purchases. Every food product we use has a generic version, which is the one we buy. Using Aldis as our primary grocery source is the tactic saving us the most!

#6 | Posted by john47 at 2017-11-05 09:36 AM | Reply

Do You Buy Store Brands?

Yes -- not always, but mostly whenever possible.

#7 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2017-11-05 09:43 AM | Reply

"consumers still think of store brands as a lower quality than the national brands"

Advertising (and maybe weapons manufacturing) is probably the greatest American accomplishment of all.

To lift a quote from Gore Vidal ...

"... advertising, which is the only art form we ever invented and developed."

QFT

#8 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2017-11-05 09:52 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

I always buy Kirkland brand at COSTCO. You gotta try the Kirkland signature Italian made 100% wool dress slacks at $39.00 per. The Mens 100% cotton Dress Shirts at $17.97 and are fab; best of all, the Kirkland Signature jeans are $12.00 per pair on line at Costco.com.

Everything in the store is top quality, lower price and 100% returnable with no questions asked. Great quality meat, Canned goods are top quality. If you are not shopping at COSTCO you are overpaying on everything from food to eyeglasses, to beer, to tires to gas.

#9 | Posted by oldwhiskeysour at 2017-11-05 10:49 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

Shin expects the proliferation of generics to continue until store shelves in the United States look more like European countries such as Switzerland, Spain, and the United Kingdom, where store brands account for 40 percent or more of sales.

Corporations won't let that happen without a serious prolonged fight in both the market place and in the political arena ...

Money buys influence, and it's easier to buy influence when the politicians are bought and paid for -- which makes designing corporate friendly legislation that much easier.

#10 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2017-11-05 11:10 AM | Reply

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"11 Reasons To Love Costco That Have Nothing To Do With Shopping"

www.huffingtonpost.com

#11 | Posted by danni at 2017-11-05 11:12 AM | Reply

I buy whatever Amazon Prime will ship to my door on subscription. I am that lazy. Soon I will never go into a retail store.

#12 | Posted by bored at 2017-11-05 01:20 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

I have zero qualms with generics from certain stores and regularly buy them from Schnucks, Target or Whole Foods.

#13 | Posted by jpw at 2017-11-05 01:53 PM | Reply

Not usually, the exception being Kirkland. I love Costco, just like Romney, only different.

#14 | Posted by bayviking at 2017-11-05 02:38 PM | Reply

I'm of the old saying "You get what you pay for".

Me and a friend compared our circulars from Food Lion. Mine wasn't much in there, as I only buy premium brands. His was chocked full of off brands and coupons.

#15 | Posted by boaz at 2017-11-05 06:24 PM | Reply

Me and a friend compared our circulars from Food Lion. Mine wasn't much in there, as I only buy premium brands. His was chocked full of off brands and coupons.

Posted by boaz at 2017-11-05 06:24 PM | Reply

A food snob. Not surprising.

#16 | Posted by LauraMohr at 2017-11-05 06:30 PM | Reply

ShopRite (SR) supermarkets in the NY/NJ area have amazing store brands. They started a Wholesome Pantry organic brand that is great. The SR brand is 30% cheaper for ORGANIC milk and 40% less for ORGANIC ALMOND milk and the products are excellent. I buy both Costco store brands and SR store brand that match/beats the competition, I always do a side by side comparison. The national brand newer organic items seem to exist to see how much of a premium they can extract. SR brands are cheaper and better.

#17 | Posted by clearheaded12 at 2017-11-06 08:23 AM | Reply

Amazon Essentials and Kirkland everything.

#18 | Posted by IndianaJones at 2017-11-06 02:30 PM | Reply

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