Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Saturday, October 21, 2017

New York City cops claim they can't tell anyone how much cash they have seized from people under civil asset forfeiture laws – because its database is not up to snuff.

The US city's police department is being sued for snubbing a Freedom of Information request from the Bronx Defenders advocacy group, which had asked for figures on dosh seized by officers. America's asset forfeiture laws are highly controversial: cops can snatch goods, cash and gift cards simply on the suspicion the gear may be associated with crime.

Records on asset seizures are stored in a Property and Evidence Tracking System (PETS), which was built for New York's finest by Capgemini. It runs on an IBM z10 mainframe with a Big Blue DB2 backend database and a web-based an ERP system from SAP, according to contract paperwork dating back to 2012.

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However, in a New York City court on Tuesday, NYPD lawyer Neil Giovanatti said the $25.5m system was, so very conveniently, simply unable to produce the required information. Manhattan Supreme Court Judge Arlene Bluth was incredulous.

"That's insane," she said repeatedly. "Do you want the Daily News to be reporting that you have no copy of the data? That deserves an exposé in the New York Times," Court House News reported.

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BULL!

I bet they can tell out to the penny how much is in the precinct's coffee fund!

IF they don't know, it's either because they don't want to know or they don't want the public to know!

Let's see what the IRS opinion is about unreported income...

#1 | Posted by TrueBlue at 2017-10-21 02:53 PM | Reply

They can't tell how much they've stolen because if they did bunches of cops would go to jail. And they wonder why people don't trust cops.

#2 | Posted by SomebodyElse at 2017-10-21 04:25 PM | Reply

If they're Republicans, let's burn them at the stake.

If Democrats, then why the racism?

#3 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2017-10-21 04:45 PM | Reply

You already know if this, the truth is bad.

#4 | Posted by fresno500 at 2017-10-21 06:16 PM | Reply

A well designed database schema would allow you to answer that question with a single 'select' statement, considering the mainframe runs DB2.

One would ordinarily think that if you're going to spend money on a mainframe, you would at least hire decent database programmers.

Yeah, the cops lied to the judge. But I'll read the rest of the story and see how it turns out.

#5 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2017-10-21 06:33 PM | Reply

"In 2014, police across the US seized $4.5bn under civil asset forfeiture rules, and a large chunk of those funds are used to supplement department budgets and pay for little treats. By contrast, in that same year, the FBI reported that burglars stole $3.9bn from American citizens."

This story keeps getting better and better. I think I'll read the PDF in it.

#6 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2017-10-21 06:41 PM | Reply

I like the cops explanation: we are too stupid to spend $25.5 million on something that works. Although that is remotely plausible, I just don't buy it. Also, I liked this: "Since the system is web-based, an automated browser scraper would be needed to extract and collate the requested information, and PETS is too fragile and too critical, we're told, to be subjected to such a tool."

Nope. For instance, you can download SQLanywhere for free (it's a very simple to write program and takes about 100k of disk space - I've written programs like it) and directly query the database. And DB2 is multi-tasking, so it won't hurt your "web-based" front end users from entering data and doing their job.

Now, onto the PDF.

#7 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2017-10-21 06:53 PM | Reply


@#5 ... A well designed database schema would allow you to answer that question with a single 'select' statement ...

Yup.

A production database is probably in 3rd normal form. One could normalize further, but that starts to affect performance in some instances.


... One would ordinarily think that if you're going to spend money on a mainframe, you would at least hire decent database programmers. ...

Yup, again.

All this makes me wonder whether the goal of putting the data into a database was to provide easy access to the data, or prevent easy access to the information.

#8 | Posted by LampLighter at 2017-10-21 07:47 PM | Reply

Yep, the PDF says exactly the same thing: "Yes we can".

The cops need to come up with a better cover story.

This is why I like English newspapers - American MSM is too corrupt to run a story like this. But back to Russia-gate.

#9 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2017-10-21 07:54 PM | Reply

So, there is already over 1 billion unaccounted for based on their taxes alone. NYC is an expensive scumhole, what did that money buy and where?

This is why I like English newspapers - American MSM is too corrupt to run a story like this. But back to Russia-gate.
#9 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2017-10-21 07:54 PM

I would be shocked to see this on PBS Newshour, but then again, it's only very rarely you will even see an "interview" that isn't fully scripted.

#10 | Posted by redlightrobot at 2017-10-22 05:50 PM | Reply

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