Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Saturday, July 15, 2017

Maryam Mirzakhani, a Stanford University professor who became the only woman to receive the highest honor in mathematics, died Saturday after a long battle with cancer, the school said. She was 40. The Iran native thrived in the study of curved surfaces, such as doughnut shapes and amoebas, to a degree that other bright minds in the field dared not explore, her colleagues have said. In 2014, she became the first woman to receive the Fields Medal, the highest honor in mathematics and equivalent in reputation to a Nobel Prize. The International Mathematical Union established the award in 1936 and has presented it to at least two people every four years since 1950. All 52 recipients before Mirazkhani were men.

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Not to minimize the Nobel Prize, but the the Fields award is more prestigious.

The Fields is offered every 4 years
The Fields is only offered to those under the age of 40
The Fields is only awarded to mathematicians

Nobel prizes are awarded annually on the anniversary of the death of Alfred Nobel
There is no age limitation for a Nobel Prize
There are multiple categories of the Nobel Prize (Chemistry, Peace, Literature, Physiology or Medicine, Physics, Economics [okay...not really Economics])

While the Nobel is the honor of a lifetime, one does not need to be a mathematician to see that the Fields' selection is more prestigious (albeit less well-known).

Mirazkhani was an immigrant from Iran. All (meaning she, as an individual and we, as a species) are richer because she was able to immigrate from Iran to the United States, and we are all poorer for her loss.

"Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"

#1 | Posted by worldasifindit at 2017-07-15 10:15 PM | Reply


This is so difficult to comment on, on so many levels.

But my main question remains.... does the exceptional justify the typical?

I am vehemently opposed to the so-called Muslim ban.

But how do I reconcile this great contributor to society with that ban?

Why even make that association?

"Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"

Yes, I've also quoted those words.

My Grandparents sailed past those words into this Great Country.

But my question remains... does the exceptional justify the typical?

I struggle with that one.

#2 | Posted by LampLighter at 2017-07-15 11:09 PM | Reply

Lamplighter's question is important and I add to it by asking have any Iranians committed terrorist acts within the United States? Secondly have any Saudi Arabians committed major terrorist acts within the United States. So why are Iranian Muslims banned but Saudis can travel here freely. And not to raise even more serious issues but...why were Saudis allowed to travel out of the U.S. after 9-11 without being interviewed by the FBI during a ban on air travel for everyone else?
Banning all those people from those nations will, in the end, be America's loss.

#3 | Posted by danni at 2017-07-16 05:50 PM | Reply

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