Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Can you imagine fully charging your cell phone in just a few seconds? Researchers in Drexel University's College of Engineering can, and they took a big step toward making it a reality with their recent work unveiling of a new battery electrode design in the journal Nature Energy.

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The team, led by Yury Gogotsi, PhD, Distinguished University and Bach professor in Drexel's College of Engineering, in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, created the new electrode designs from a highly conductive, two-dimensional material called MXene. Their design could make energy storage devices like batteries, viewed as the plodding tanker truck of energy storage technology, just as fast as the speedy supercapacitors that are used to provide energy in a pinch -- often as a battery back-up or to provide quick bursts of energy for things like camera flashes.

"This paper refutes the widely accepted dogma that chemical charge storage, used in batteries and pseudocapacitors, is always much slower than physical storage used in electrical double-layer capacitors, also known as supercapacitors," Gogotsi said. "We demonstrate charging of thin MXene electrodes in tens of milliseconds. This is enabled by very high electronic conductivity of MXene. This paves the way to development of ultrafast energy storage devices than can be charged and discharged within seconds, but store much more energy than conventional supercapacitors."

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yeah I have seen lots a so called quick charging batteries improvements lately but none seems to have made it to the market yet.

#1 | Posted by PunchyPossum at 2017-07-11 11:24 PM | Reply

#1 The solid state lithium ion battery is coming out in about three years. Instead of a liquid electrolyte, it uses a glass. It has three times the storage capacity and is also fats charging, in about five minutes.

And then there is the work on the nano-battery.

#2 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2017-07-11 11:39 PM | Reply

Anyone ever read the Riverworld series? It had the concept of a Battacitor, it would store energy like a capacitor but slowly release it like a battery.

Looks like fiction is merging on fact.

#3 | Posted by leftcoastlawyer at 2017-07-11 11:55 PM | Reply

"The team, led by Yury Gogotsi, PhD"

DEY TOOK YER JERBS

#4 | Posted by snoofy at 2017-07-12 12:51 AM | Reply

yeah I have seen lots a so called quick charging batteries improvements lately but none seems to have made it to the market yet.

#1 | POSTED BY PUNCHYPOSSUM

EXACTLY. Electro-chemical energy storage will always have the same 3 inherent limitations, regardless of other factors (how fast they charge and discharge, etc...).

#1 - The chemical electrolyte breaks down after repeated charge cycles (the very best batteries only have thousands of cycles),
#2 - the substance and the conversion process have a time-based electrical resistance curve (which means heat and fire).
#3 - they require dangerous and/or exotic materials.

Solid-state Lithium (like Helium says in #2) may be good on the 1st point (I doubt it though), but it sucks on the 2nd and 3rd points.

That is why I am sticking to my prediction that the future belongs to electro-static storage devices (capacitors);

#1 - capacitors have millions of charge/discharge cycles (3 orders of magnitude more than batteries).
#2 - the have no internal resistance because there is no conversion process (they don't explode and they don't burn).
#3 - You can make super-capacitors in your kitchen with common household materials.

#5 | Posted by kudzu at 2017-07-12 06:59 AM | Reply

Capacitors explode violently when over-volted. The smoke is very toxic.

#6 | Posted by sitzkrieg at 2017-07-12 09:15 AM | Reply

Capacitors explode violently when over-volted.

#6 | POSTED BY SITZKRIEG

So will these things;

Batteries
Water
Anything conductive
Corn dogs
Puppy dogs
Your head
You favorite bunny slippers

#7 | Posted by kudzu at 2017-07-12 11:30 AM | Reply

(they don't explode and they don't burn).

#5 | POSTED BY KUDZU AT 2017-07-12 11:30 AM | FLAG:

So will these things;

#7 | POSTED BY KUDZU AT 2017-07-12 11:30 AM | FLAG:

I fear for anybody that has to use anything you've engineered. They're dead people walking.

#8 | Posted by sitzkrieg at 2017-07-12 01:08 PM | Reply

#1 - The chemical electrolyte breaks down after repeated charge cycles (the very best batteries only have thousands of cycles),
#2 - the substance and the conversion process have a time-based electrical resistance curve (which means heat and fire).
#3 - they require dangerous and/or exotic materials.

1. Not unlike the oil lubricants that break down in engines.
2. Engines produce both heat and fire as well, and uncontrolled those can be sufficiently dangerous.
3. While you don't technically need platinum, it's in your catalytic converter. But maybe we should talk about dangerous brake pad particulate emissions again. Having ridden in a Tesla since that discussion, the amount of regenerative braking that thing does is ridiculous, taking your foot off the gas is basically like putting it gently on the brake in a normal car. If you live in roll through stop sign land, you never have to touch the brake except for traffic. Also the number of Teslas I see seems to be going up exponentially.

#9 | Posted by snoofy at 2017-07-13 01:03 AM | Reply

#9 | POSTED BY SNOOFY

Easy there, fellow. Sitzright has a problem with cold hard facts.

He drives his steam-driven horseless carriage down to the Luddites weekly meeting and get's filled up on indignation by how fast things are changing.

#10 | Posted by kudzu at 2017-07-13 07:33 AM | Reply

I fear for anybody that has to use anything you've engineered.

#8 | POSTED BY SITZKRIEG

Then fear for yourself, and everyone else in America, and most of the civilized world. There is not a person in this country who doesn't fit into that category.

You may be able to removes yourself from that group if you stop doing these things; Driving, flying, eating, using plastic products, steel-based products, pharmaceuticals, coffee, beer, etc...

#11 | Posted by kudzu at 2017-07-13 07:37 AM | Reply

#11 My brother is an electrical engineer. He has a T-shirt that read "Inflammable? Challenge accepted!"

#12 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2017-07-13 08:11 AM | Reply

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