Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Friday, June 16, 2017

A bipartisan group of senators and representatives have reintroduced legislation that would enable states to set their own medical marijuana policies. That is at odds with a letter U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions sent to congressional leaders, in which he asked that federal medical marijuana protections be reversed. Senators Cory Booker, D-N.J., and Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., joined by Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Tenn., made the announcement on Thursday. Booker addressed the Sessions letter, saying the Attorney General "misrepresents the facts" on medical marijuana. "I dare him to sit down with families and listen to their stories and then pursue a policy like he's advocating for now," the New Jersey senator said.

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The legislation reintroduced Thursday would protect patients, doctors and businesses participating in state medical-marijuana programs from federal prosecution.

The Compassionate Access, Research Expansion and Respect States (CARERS) Act would not legalize medical marijuana in all 50 states. Instead, it would ensure that people in the states where medical cannabis is legal can use it without violating federal law.

In addition to Booker and Gillibrand, co-sponsors of the CARERS Act include Senators Rand Paul, R-Ky., Mike Lee, R-Utah, Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, and Al Franken, D-Minn.

Patients and parents who rely on medical marijuana also attended the press conference. Jennifer Collins, a 17-year old Virginia resident, spoke about how medical cannabis helps control her epilepsy.

"People worry that medical cannabis is a gateway drug," Collins said. "We know that's not true. And for me, medical cannabis has been a gateway to a better life."

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Follow the money.

Tell you what... let's compare a couple of things. The number of people who died or had a highly negative experience from taking FDA approved drugs vs. people who've died or had highly negative experiences from using marijuana.

#1 | Posted by lfthndthrds at 2017-06-16 07:32 AM | Reply

'"I dare him to sit down with families and listen to their stories and then pursue a policy like he's advocating for now," the New Jersey senator said.'

Sessions doesn't give a crap about people. He wants to keep the jails full and he wants to cut down on competition with big Pharma. He'd leave a meeting with these families with a list of people to investigate.

Understand who you are dealing with.

#2 | Posted by Sully at 2017-06-16 10:02 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 3

keep the jails full

#2 | POSTED BY SULLY

you are probably aware that some of his biggest contributors are/were prison corporations. I don't know how it is in other states, but in alabama (his home state), we have judges being kicked out of office every single day because of sentencing jay-walkers to life in prison, and getting those sweet, sweet kickbacks.

It's very lucrative, if you are evil enough to do it.

#3 | Posted by kudzu at 2017-06-17 07:57 AM | Reply

Sessions doesn't give a crap about people. He wants to keep the jails full and he wants to cut down on the competition with big Pharma.
#2 | POSTED BY SULLY

Keep the jails full? That might be a little hyperbolic, but competition with big Pharma, I completely agree with.

The 3rd voice of opposition is medical providers in Colorado after pot was made legal. It may be because this event coincided with Obamacare making it easy to get and use Medicaid, but providers (those who still see Medicaid patients) have seen an increase in abuse of not only marijuana but also tobacco and alcohol among Medicaid patients. They all say they are using it for their health, but the chronic use is causing other medical problems like gastroparesis among the other known problems with lungs and brain.

The "medical" aspect of marijuana is confusing the addicts in the population who we ignore anyway from a medical point of view (we just throw them in jail, to your point).

I am for getting rid of the laws around "medical" uses of marijuana and decriminalize in all states similar to alcohol and tobacco. There are so many medical uses and patients who benefit from them, but they are in the minority. Why should they have to move to Colorado just to get medical attention?

#4 | Posted by LastAmerican at 2017-06-17 10:45 AM | Reply

"The "medical" aspect of marijuana is confusing the addicts in the population"

I'm not sure what that means, but it sure confuses Jeff Sessions.

#5 | Posted by snoofy at 2017-06-17 11:28 AM | Reply

I'm not sure what that means, but it sure confuses Jeff Sessions.
#5 | POSTED BY SNOOFY

no, I think they are on to something and I hope it means that the Federal Government will get out of the drug business, but the odds are against me. If this bill goes through, all of the states that allow medical marijuana will be faced with the decision to decriminalize marijuana for recreational use or not.

On the other hand, this bill is just a symptom of something worse which is the Feds being in the drug business. Boy, it sure seems like a good idea in the '80s, but it's created more problems than it solved. It solved nothing, in my opinion.

#6 | Posted by LastAmerican at 2017-06-17 11:41 AM | Reply

The clear answer in this case wait until another session of congress, in which senators of reason can protect medical cannabis. Even business insider concedes that there are many benefits of doing so:

www.businessinsider.com

#7 | Posted by wj112358 at 2017-06-17 08:39 PM | Reply

It would be great for the Senate to support this legislation.

#8 | Posted by GOnoles92 at 2017-06-18 01:27 PM | Reply

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