Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Thursday, June 15, 2017

Academic studies and countless anecdotes make it clear that being interrupted, talked over, shut down or penalized for speaking out is nearly a universal experience for women when they are outnumbered by men.

Senator Harris, a former prosecutor, assertively questioned Attorney General Jeff Sessions during his testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee. Senator John McCain, Republican of Arizona, interrupted and chided her to let Mr. Sessions answer her questions. Soon after that, Senator Richard Burr, Republican of North Carolina and the committee chairman, cut her off, saying her time had elapsed.

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Victoria L. Brescoll, associate professor of organizational behavior at the Yale School of Management, published a paper in 2012 showing that men with power talked more in the Senate, which was not the case for women. Another study, "Can an Angry Woman Get Ahead?" concluded that men who became angry were rewarded, but that angry women were seen as incompetent and unworthy of power in the workplace.

Indeed, Jason Miller, a former adviser to President Trump's campaign and a CNN commentator, described Senator Harris as "hysterical" and shouting during her questioning of Mr. Sessions. At times, Senator Harris cut Mr. Sessions off, but she spoke in an even tone.

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I could see why Sen Harris was cut off. Her line of questioning was drilling down too deeply, too quickly.

Her questions may have resulted in a dead end, or they may have resulted in some useful information. We'll never know now.

But it appeared to me that she was a step or two ahead of AG Sessions' evasive tactics, as he unsuccessfully tried to come up with fluffy answers.

#1 | Posted by LampLighter at 2017-06-15 12:34 PM | Reply

The stories in the article are very common negative experiences that can and do happen to everyone. People tend to notice it more when it is happens to them personally but that hardly means they are singled out.

#2 | Posted by Sully at 2017-06-15 12:35 PM | Reply

I have no doubt based on my life experience that the premise of this article is true. We see it EVERY day, but it is so commonplace that we take it for granted and don't think twice about it. It takes a strong willed woman to make her voice heard in our society. That simply is the way it is. And when you compound that by placing the woman among a group of alpha males like we see in a power structure such as the Senate, a woman almost doesn't stand a chance. The shutting down of Kamala Harris by her male colleagues in the way they shut her down is just about stereotypic. It's events like this which should remind all of us of the necessity for gender diversity in elected office.

#3 | Posted by moder8 at 2017-06-15 12:46 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Laura's experience might be interesting here, has she found that she is interrupted more as a woman?

#4 | Posted by danni at 2017-06-15 01:19 PM | Reply

I found it interesting that Kamala Harris was cited as an example. In recent questioning she has repeatedly interrupted those whom she was questioning, to the point of being extremely rude.

#5 | Posted by JeffJ at 2017-06-15 01:24 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Men do this to other men as well.

I'm not denying they do it more to women, or do it more when there are more men and fewer women around. But just two guys talking will do this.

Look at a Robert Altman mobie the reason the dialogue is so good is because people talk over each other, just like in real life.

Donald did it to Hillary a bunch, and he did it to the nen in the primary too.

#6 | Posted by snoofy at 2017-06-15 01:29 PM | Reply

"In recent questioning she has repeatedly interrupted those whom she was questioning, to the point of being extremely rude."

It's appropriate to interrupt a witness when they don't answer the question.

That's not what they're talking about in this article.

#7 | Posted by snoofy at 2017-06-15 01:39 PM | Reply

Indeed, Jason Miller, a former adviser to President Trump's campaign and a CNN commentator, described Senator Harris as "hysterical" and shouting during her questioning of Mr. Sessions. At times, Senator Harris cut Mr. Sessions off, but she spoke in an even tone.

ROTFL There are a lot of things one could say about Harris' questioning of Sessions but hysterical and shouting are not among them. Focused, determined, persistent, no nonsense. She interrupted Sessions because he was trying to run out the clock on her allotted time with non-answer answers. I don't doubt her questioning made him nervous. She's wicked smart.

#8 | Posted by Gal_Tuesday at 2017-06-15 02:57 PM | Reply

Laura's experience might be interesting here, has she found that she is interrupted more as a woman?

#4 | POSTED BY DANNI AT 2017-06-15 01:19 PM | FLAG:

This is a very scientific approach. Control Larry, Experimental Laura. It's great!

#9 | Posted by BruceBanner at 2017-06-15 03:03 PM | Reply

What one side refers to as "The Universal Phenomenon of Men Interrupting Women" is referred to by the other side as "trying to get a word in edgewise because she won't stop talking".

#10 | Posted by MUSTANG at 2017-06-16 07:40 AM | Reply

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