Saturday, January 27, 2018

Why money is more important then policies for Dem candidates

Candidates who who signed up to battle Donald Trump must get past the Democratic party first In his farewell address, President Barack Obama had some practical advice for those frustrated by his successor. "If you're disappointed by your elected officials, grab a clipboard, get some signatures, and run for office yourself," Obama implored. Yet across the country, the DCCC, its allied groups, or leaders within the Democratic Party are working hard against some of these new candidates for Congress, publicly backing their more established opponents, according to interviews with more than 50 candidates, party operatives, and members of Congress. Winning the support of Washington heavyweights, including the DCCC -- implicit or explicit -- is critical for endorsements back home and a boost to fundraising. In general, it can give a candidate a tremendous advantage over opponents in a Democratic primary.

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In district after district, the national party is throwing its weight behind candidates who are out of step with the national mood. The DCCC -- known as "the D-trip" in Washington -- has officially named 18 candidates as part of its "Red to Blue" program. (A D-trip spokesperson cautioned that a red-to-blue designation is not an official endorsement, but functions that way in practice. Program designees get exclusive financial and strategy resources from the party.) In many of those districts, there is at least one progressive challenger the party is working to elbow aside, some more viable than others. Outside of those 18

Prioritizing fundraising, as Democratic Party officials do, has a feedback effect that creates lawmakers who are further and further removed from the people they are elected to represent. In 2013, the DCCC offered a startling presentation for incoming lawmakers, telling them they would be expected to immediately begin four hours of "call time" every day they were in Washington. That's time spent dialing for dollars from high-end donors.

Spending that much time on the phone with the same class of people can unconsciously influence thinking. There is, former Rep. Tom Perriello, D-Va. said in a 2013 interview, "an enormous anti-populist element, particularly for Dems, who are most likely to be hearing from people who can write at least a $500 check. They may be liberal, quite liberal, in fact, but are also more likely to consider the deficit a bigger crisis than the lack of jobs."

Perriello was elected in the 2008 Obama wave and washed back out in the tea party one that followed. The time spent fundraising, he said in 2013, "helps to explain why many from very safe Dem districts who might otherwise be pushing the conversation to the left, or at least willing to be the first to take tough votes, do not – because they get their leadership positions by raising from the same donors noted above."

How Much Money Can You Raise?

The way to win party support is to pass the phone test.

In order to establish whether a person is worthy of official backing, DCCC operatives will "rolodex" a candidate, according to a source familiar with the procedure. On the most basic level, it involves candidates being asked to pull out their smartphones, scroll through their contacts lists, and add up the amount of money their contacts could raise or contribute to their campaigns. If the candidates' contacts aren't good for at least $250,000, or in some cases much more, they fail the test, and party support goes elsewhere.

Comments

"at a time when the DCCC is increasingly wedded to congressional moderates. In somewhat of a reprisal of the Emanuel strategy, the DCCC is leaning on business-friendly Democrats to take back the House.

For the first time since 2006, the Blue Dog Coalition, the right-leaning Democratic group that prides itself on promoting socially conservative, business-friendly lawmakers, has worked with the DCCC to select the party's candidates for the 2018 midterms.

The new collaboration is a stunning reversal for a party that has seen a groundswell of support for progressive ideas -- such as a $15 minimum wage and single-payer health care -- that are staunchly opposed by the Blue Dog wing of the party. Operatives from the DCCC meet on a weekly basis with the Blue Dogs to discuss recruitment and how to best steer resources to a growing slate of centrist Democratic candidates, according to Politico.

"The DCCC recognizes that the path to the majority is through the Blue Dogs," Rep. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., chair of the Blue Dog PAC, told Politico.

For party officials concerned about raising cash, Blue Dogs are a safe bet. Public disclosures with the Federal Election Commission show that the Blue Dog PAC is fueled by the biggest spenders on congressional campaigns on K Street, the term Washingtonians use colloquially to refer to a center of lobbyist shops. PAC money from the National Mining Association, AT&T, McKesson, Comcast, the National Restaurant Association, and other business interests have buoyed Blue Dog PAC coffers, which are spent recruiting and financing moderate Democrats."

#1 | Posted by PunchyPossum at 2018-01-27 10:19 PM

Really pathetic, and they wonder why Sanders hasn't joined their party (not that they want him).

There is a two faced element to both Obama and Trump that party loyalists fail to grasp.

#2 | Posted by bayviking at 2018-01-28 06:43 AM

Congress only has 1 skill in common among its members. Fundraising. That's it.

#3 | Posted by sitzkrieg at 2018-01-28 11:16 AM

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