Sunday, January 21, 2018

City With 3.7 Million Residents Has Three Months of Water Left

With fewer than 95 days left before they run dry, Cape Town might become the first major city in the world to run out of water. The coastal South African city has been battling droughts for nearly three years, amounting to the worst one in their history. It's now seriously reaching crunch time. With little rain on the horizon, the city has now ordered its 3.7 million residents to drastically cut their water consumption, take short stop-start showers, not wash their cars, and flush toilets as little as possible. If they don't, all of their taps could be shut off by April.

Comments

The end is near. This has nothing to do with fake religions. It is a natural consequence of our own selfish stupidity campaigning arrogantly against nature.

#1 | Posted by bayviking at 2018-01-21 02:50 PM

Those liberals and their, "kooky" global warming theories. Let's all set back and laugh!

#2 | Posted by zelkova at 2018-01-21 02:50 PM

I always wonder where the water is going. For all the droughts, there must be other places getting excessive rainfall.

#3 | Posted by REDIAL at 2018-01-21 02:54 PM

3

My college town was on a pretty serious water rationing plan at one time. The local reservoir was very low due to several years of little rainfall.

Reduced water shower heads, big fine to fill up swimming pool, strictly enforced lawn watering schedules, etc.

It lasted for 3-4 years and after a big year of rain, it was over.

But it wasn't 3 million people or more.

#4 | Posted by eberly at 2018-01-21 03:00 PM

Coastal city, maybe time for a desalination plant

#5 | Posted by bruceaz at 2018-01-21 03:08 PM

Coastal city, maybe time for a desalination plant

Great idea, but environmentalists in Cape Town and the Progressive Party of South Africa have been blocking their development for over 10 years, as too costly, too much brine discharge into the ocean, use too much power, etc. It's only now that it is a crisis that they are pointing fingers at each other, wondering if they can build one "quickly".

#6 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2018-01-21 03:53 PM

Theoretically the drought will end so a desalination plant would be a lot of money and effort that may not be needed again for decades.

#7 | Posted by REDIAL at 2018-01-21 03:58 PM

So don't build a huge one, in the good years you keep it putting along to replenish the aquifers

#8 | Posted by bruceaz at 2018-01-21 05:14 PM

I did a little Googling and despite RoC's arm flap flap flapping Cape Town has been building 4 desalination plants that will be going online next month.

#9 | Posted by REDIAL at 2018-01-21 05:28 PM

Well, sounds like their city officials can't do their job.

#10 | Posted by Crassus at 2018-01-21 11:12 PM

#9

Thanks for making my point, DRtard, the first one will come on line in February (probably March) but are about 3 years late. They wasted too much time bickering about them and have to rush them online once they realized they were screwed. You do realize that they have been rationing water for months now and will actually run out if the plants aren't producing in the next month or so...

Ticking water time bomb: Tenders for desalination plants left too late

Cape Town will have its first desalination plants working just weeks before the city's dams are expected to go dry.

Mayor Patricia de Lille said earlier this month that the municipal water supply might dry up in March if usage was not reduced.

Chris Braybrooke, general manager of water technology company Veolia, said completion of tendering for the desalination plants should have been six months ago and that the city's water problem was a "ticking time bomb".

"We were quite surprised there was such a long wait for the city to invite tenders and then they asked for instant solutions," said Braybrooke, whose company has built several desalination plants in South Africa, including the country's largest, in Mossel Bay.

"This type of tender should have [been invited at least] six months ago."

Aquifers and dams are never supposed to go completely dry, if an aquifer goes dry the chance of earthquakes goes way up and the aquifer is useless.

#11 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2018-01-22 12:29 AM

Great idea, but environmentalists in Cape Town and the Progressive Party of South Africa have been blocking their development for over 10 years, as too costly, too much brine discharge into the ocean, use too much power, etc. It's only now that it is a crisis that they are pointing fingers at each other, wondering if they can build one "quickly".

#6 | POSTED BY RIGHTOCENTER

...It would kill the local fishing which the town and surrounding area depends on...

Also, they can't afford it. It wasn't just the environmentalists. It was also the Conservatives who didn't want to spend the money.

You should read more.

#12 | Posted by Sycophant at 2018-01-22 11:03 AM

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