Friday, December 29, 2017

Startup Rents Tiny Houses in the Woods

Lavanya Ramanathan, Washington Post: To commune with ourselves, we must trek two hours to Stanardsville, a town on the edge of Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains whose population has stairstepped down over the years to 384 people, a country store and this wooded plot, which, before 20 tiny houses arrived this fall, was an RV campground called Heavenly Acres. ... For the suburban families who have made Tiny House Hunters an HGTV hit, tiny houses are an alternate reality, an incredible stretch of the imagination. "How could anyone live with so little?" is the obvious question. The better one: "What must that be like, to not be so in debt that your skin feels like it's on fire every moment of every waking day?"

Comments

Tiny houses as trendy is the product of horrific income inequality.

Those who promote them should be ashamed.

#1 | Posted by Tor at 2017-12-29 06:45 PM

--Those who promote them should be ashamed.

BS. The tiny home trend is long overdue. Most people don't need these bloated single-family homes that have doubled in size in the last few decades. Americans are in debt to their eyeballs. They need to downsize their homes, their cars, and their waist lines. Stop whining and live within' your means.

#2 | Posted by nullifidian at 2017-12-29 06:59 PM

Tiny houses as trendy is the product of horrific income inequality.

That's quite a stretch, hope you didn't pull anything.

#3 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2017-12-29 07:01 PM

3

If he did, he'd blame it on horrific income equality.

#4 | Posted by eberly at 2017-12-29 07:06 PM

www.youtube.com

#5 | Posted by Tor at 2017-12-29 07:10 PM

Tiny houses as trendy is the product of horrific income inequality.

Those who promote them should be ashamed.

#1 | POSTED BY TOR

Exactly !!

#6 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2017-12-29 07:55 PM

#1 - TOR

No amount of income equalization is going to prevent inner city housing prices from rocketing above the average home buyer's income. Only pricing controls will stop inner cities from becoming un-affordable to the average home buyer.

#7 | Posted by gavaster at 2017-12-29 08:02 PM

To be clear I think most tiny houses look cool and might be fun to live in for say a few months.

But if you are looking to them for permanent housing and to raise kids in you're in effect replicating the beginning of a feudal system with the inhabitants as peasants.

#8 | Posted by Tor at 2017-12-29 08:09 PM

To be clear I think most tiny houses look cool and might be fun to live in for say a few months.

But if you are looking to them for permanent housing and to raise kids in you're in effect replicating the beginning of a feudal system with the inhabitants as peasants.

#8 | POSTED BY TOR

You just described fast food work from the early 1980's that allowed high school kids to get some entry-level job experience before moving on to college or a 40 hour a week manufacturing-type job with family-size sustaining benefits ... 40 years later older adults make up more than half of fast food workers because ... well, we know why ... www.drudge.com

#9 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2017-12-29 08:32 PM

--nd to raise kids in you're in effect replicating the beginning of a feudal system with the inhabitants as peasants.

Nonsense on stilts. They aren't for raising kids. They are for one or two responsible adults who don't have kids they can't afford.

#10 | Posted by nullifidian at 2017-12-29 08:47 PM

- They aren't for raising kids.

Um... that was pretty much his point, -----------.

#11 | Posted by Corky at 2017-12-29 08:50 PM

--You just described fast food work from the early 1980's that allowed high school kids to get some entry-level job experience

All those jobs have been taken by illegal immigrants, especially in places like southern California.

#12 | Posted by nullifidian at 2017-12-29 09:02 PM

Actually, his point was that they are a "product of horrific income inequality."

But thanks for playing.

#13 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2017-12-29 09:03 PM

"40 years later older adults make up more than half of fast food workers because ... well, we know why "

Yes, because they are minimum skilled workers.

#14 | Posted by eberly at 2017-12-29 09:46 PM

= a "product of horrific income inequality."

Includes breaking down families... that don't fit in tiny homes. If you can't think, don't post.

#15 | Posted by Corky at 2017-12-29 10:39 PM

My recent ancestry includes tenet farmers.

I know some of the games people play to concentrate wealth.

#16 | Posted by Tor at 2017-12-29 11:00 PM

All those jobs have been taken by illegal immigrants, especially in places like southern California.

#12 | POSTED BY NULLIFIDIAN

Here are the numbers regarding undocumented workers ...

www.reuters.com

The overall number of immigrants employed in the sector climbed from just over 1.7 million in 2008 to 1.8 million in 2010, according to this data, even as native employment fell from 6.4 million to 5.9 million.

The Pew Hispanic Center -- whose demographic and labor market work is highly regarded -- estimated in a 2009 report that 12 percent of the workforce in food preparation and serving in 2008 was undocumented.


And here is what the fast food industry looks like ...

groundswell.org

The days of high school kids flipping burgers after school to earn a little extra spending cash are long gone. Today, 40 percent of the workforce in the fast food industry is 25 or older, and the average fast-food worker is 29 years old. 26 percent of fast food workers are parents with children.

Whenever I go thru a drive-thru the people handing my food are mostly older tatted up white folks or older black folks, per the above age demographics.

#17 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2017-12-30 09:42 AM

Tiny apartment in Tokya

www.livingbiginatinyhouse.com

#18 | Posted by danni at 2017-12-30 02:22 PM

Damn, is the pull-down ironing board considered a spare bedroom? ☺

#19 | Posted by madscientist at 2017-12-30 03:00 PM

If you can't think, don't post.

If that was a rule on the DR you would have been banned over a decade ago.

#20 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2017-12-31 12:28 PM

I've vacationed in a scenic "tiny home," in a forested area. "Glamping" It's a pretty sweet gig if you're spending the time with someone special, and it also places subtle pressure to get out of the "house."

Crazy/hilarious to see a ReTarter attempt to spin the eco-conscious "tiny house" trend of downsizing living space and focusing on sustainability and minimalism, as some sort of socio-political-economical commentary lmao.

#21 | Posted by GOnoles92 at 2017-12-31 12:39 PM

Crazy/hilarious to see a ReTarter attempt to spin the eco-conscious "tiny house" trend of downsizing living space and focusing on sustainability and minimalism, as some sort of socio-political-economical commentary lmao.

#21 | POSTED BY GONOLES92

Reno's tiny house village for the homeless seeks donations

www.rgj.com

Housing and Urban Development funding has continued to disappear over the last few years.

New construction is slow and the new tax reform bill might also limit affordable housing credits and funding for private developers.

In some cases, new projects are set aside for low-income earners and veterans, such as with the proposed Summit Club in south Reno.

But many homeless people don't immediately qualify for that assistance.


Here's an idea ... how about properly funding the federal government by raising taxes on those Americans who can afford their taxes being raised, so HUD can properly do the job of figuring out how to properly house those people struggling at the bottom of America's socio-economic ladder.

You just see these things as a cute fad ... but all fads pass.

While I'm glad that there's roof's over the heads for people who need them, let's hope this doesn't become America's new normal.

#22 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2017-12-31 01:29 PM

Pinch, you are conflating homeless shelters with the Tiny House movement when they are completely different things. I guess since they are both "tiny" that is what counts in your narrative.

That being said, I completely agree that more needs to be done to get the homeless off the street, but just as important as shelter is improving Mental Health facilities across the US.

#23 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2017-12-31 01:39 PM

Pinch, you are conflating homeless shelters with the Tiny House movement when they are completely different things. I guess since they are both "tiny" that is what counts in your narrative.

That being said, I completely agree that more needs to be done to get the homeless off the street, but just as important as shelter is improving Mental Health facilities across the US.

#23 | POSTED BY RIGHTOCENTER

Nope, I'm not conflating anything ...

While homeless people do have high prevalence of mental health issues, their MH issues mostly come to the forefront due to their economic situation.

Someone who is bipolar, schizophrenic, or has PTSD doesn't just wake up one day and decides to be homeless, becoming homeless is a process where circumstances, most often than not out of someone's control, pile up ...

Here's more evidence of Tiny Houses for the homeless...

Eugene Tiny Homes Provide Housing Bridge For Homeless People
www.opb.org

San Jose approves 40 tiny homes for the homeless
sf.curbed.com

Homeless No More: Tiny Home Community Houses Veterans in Racine
wuwm.com

SaunaVelo could provide answer to heating tiny houses for homeless
www.kgw.com

Seattle's Homeless Crisis: Are tiny houses the answer?
q13fox.com

Like I said, how about addressing the underlying economic reasons that create homelessness in the first place?

Just the thought that Tiny Houses is the best answer to homelessness should worry everyone.

#24 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2017-12-31 02:13 PM

By the way ... most Americans are so damn fat, how the hell can they even turn around in one of these Tiny Houses without knocking out a freaking wall ????

#25 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2017-12-31 02:24 PM

By the way ... most Americans are so damn fat, how the hell can they even turn around in one of these Tiny Houses without knocking out a freaking wall ????

Posted by PinchALoaf at 2017-12-31 02:24 PM | Reply

Put your feet together and put your arms crossed in front of you and very gently wiggle yourself around making sure your body is in perfect vertical alignment with your body's vertical center never deviates at all.

#26 | Posted by LauraMohr at 2017-12-31 02:32 PM

Put your feet together and put your arms crossed in front of you and very gently wiggle yourself around making sure your body is in perfect vertical alignment with your body's vertical center never deviates at all.

#26 | POSTED BY LAURAMOHR

And when you're with someone special, break out the motion lotion ~

#27 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2017-12-31 03:06 PM

Number of homeless in America = 500,000

Number of abandoned homes in America = 18,900,000

#28 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2017-12-31 03:18 PM

#24

Still conflating, the Tiny Homes movement referenced by this article is completely different than the tiny houses that Cities are looking to build for the homeless. It's a partial answer, nothing more. Mental health and addiction programs are equally important.

#27

I just threw up in my mouth.

#29 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2017-12-31 03:31 PM

"Mental health and addiction programs are equally important."

Not if you're homeless and you don't have mental health and addiction problems.

Homelessness is the condition of not having a home. You're talking about unmet health needs, which is a separate set of problems from unmet housing needs. Even when the two are related, they are separate problems with separate solutions.

#30 | Posted by snoofy at 2017-12-31 03:47 PM

Still conflating, the Tiny Homes movement referenced by this article is completely different than the tiny houses that Cities are looking to build for the homeless. It's a partial answer, nothing more. Mental health and addiction programs are equally important.

#29 | POSTED BY RIGHTOCENTER

I'm not conflating ... I just showed you 6 links about Tiny Houses used for the homeless, to the 1 thread about a affluent suburban people going on a Tiny House vacation.

And as important as treating mental health and addiction, doing so only treats the symptoms ... the root cause of homelessness is economic ... and curing the economic problem is also preventive medicine that gives hope to people who would otherwise succumb to the ravages of addiction.

#31 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2017-12-31 03:49 PM

#27

I just threw up in my mouth.

#29 | POSTED BY RIGHTOCENTER

Okay, 86 the motion lotion and use astro-glide.

#32 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2017-12-31 04:18 PM

#31

Hate to channel Snoofy here, but do you think the tiny houses built for the homeless and the Tiny Homes referenced in the article are the same thing?

A large percentage of the homeless suffer from mental health and addiction problems that keep them from holding even a minimum wage job, providing them a "home" that many of them don't want will not solve the problem.

#33 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2017-12-31 04:24 PM

"It's a partial answer, nothing more"

No dude. By definition of the word "homelessness" it's a complete answer to the problem of homelessness.

You are conflating the problem of homelessness by folding in the separate but often related problems of addiction and lack of mental health care.

Why are you doing that? It's like you don't think someone can end up homeless unless they are an addict with an untreated mental health diagnosis. That's --------.

#34 | Posted by snoofy at 2017-12-31 04:28 PM

'A large percentage of the homeless suffer from mental health and addiction problems."

A large percentage of the non-homeless population suffers from mental health and addiction problems.

#35 | Posted by snoofy at 2017-12-31 04:30 PM

A large percentage of the homeless suffer from mental health and addiction problems that keep them from holding even a minimum wage job, providing them a "home" that many of them don't want will not solve the problem.

#33 | POSTED BY RIGHTOCENTER

While we need to treat the symptoms (addiction and MH), the disease won't ultimately be cured unless we address what's causing homelessness (decent jobs).

And prevention (decent jobs) is always the best medicine to prevent the disease (homelessness) in the first place.

I've already explained this in so many words.

#36 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2017-12-31 05:10 PM

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