Friday, November 24, 2017

Florida’s Teacher Gap Is No Mystery

Shocking news in last week's Sun-Sentinel:

Almost three months into the school year, thousands of public school students in South Florida still don't have a permanent teacher -- a problem expected to get worse as more educators flee the classroom and the number of those seeking teaching degrees plummets.
Okay, not shocking. Utterly predictable, given Florida's unending efforts to create the worst atmosphere for public education in the country.

More

Here are some of the things they've done, in no particular order:

* They have tried to make it possible for parents to stamp out the teaching of science.

* They have given charters the unchecked ability to steal local tax dollars.

* They have made an absolute disastrous amateur-hour hash out of their Big Standardized Test.

* They have made successful students repeat third grade for failing to love the BST.

* They have declared ― in court ― that teacher-prepared report cards are meaningless.

* They have demonstrated how badly teacher merit pay can fail.

* They made a dying child take the Big Standardized Test.

* They turned recess into a political football.

* They based a strategic plan based on bad retail management.

* They abolished tenure and fired teachers for advocating for students.

* They've allowed racist underfunding of schools to flourish.

* They have provided ample proof that an A-F school rating system doesn't work.

* They host experiments in computerized avatar classrooms.

* They have charter legislation hustled through the capital by lawmakers who profit from it.

* They allow more charter misbehavior than you can shake a stick at.

* They have created a charter money grab law so onerous and obnoxious they have actually moved public schools to sue the state government.

Comments

And Trump wants to replicate Florida throughout the country with DeVos.

#1 | Posted by Sycophant at 2017-11-24 03:22 PM

charter vs public. i support public.

#2 | Posted by ichiro at 2017-11-24 04:10 PM

Whenever there is a shortage of something I'd look to see if there are artificial barriers put in place to protect prior interests. I.e. restrictive licencing or union membership requirements.

#3 | Posted by visitor_ at 2017-11-25 09:39 AM

#3 - Like just about everything else in a free market you righties love so much, you get what you pay for. The market decides what a teaching job is worth. Florida has reached the bottom of the price point to make it worth it for qualified teachers to seek jobs there.

#4 | Posted by schmanch at 2017-11-25 10:47 AM

No such thing as a free market in public education. Pretty sure that wouldn't be a good idea, but there are plenty of artificial barriers when it comes to licensing. Credentials are not qualifications.

#5 | Posted by visitor_ at 2017-11-25 12:38 PM

Oh. This is about Public Schools. I was worried for a second.

#6 | Posted by bogey1355 at 2017-11-25 08:53 PM

#6, Then again, some Trump supporters don't bother pretending they care about the poor.

#7 | Posted by snoofy at 2017-11-25 09:21 PM

Well, Wisconsin got rid of unions and they're hemorrhaging teachers.

Meanwhile, there's been discussion of loosening teacher licensing requirements particularly in non-core areas. I know some teachers in favor, but most teachers I know feel that the mistake there is thinking that a teacher teaches a subject. That's simply not true. A teacher teaches a student. Not every person who is skilled in an area belongs in front of a classroom. Indeed, sometimes the people who are best at a subject struggle while teaching it because they never had to work to understand it. They have a hard time relating to the students who don't get it the first time.

I digress. My point is this: it seems as if the go-to solution in education in many places is to lower teacher's compensation, lower the requirements for being a teacher, and then complain about the lack of quality teachers. If you want a better service, you have to offer better compensation. I feel this is simple economics.

#8 | Posted by dylanfan at 2017-11-25 09:37 PM

#8

NW

#9 | Posted by Corky at 2017-11-25 09:39 PM

"or union membership requirements."

Florida is a Right-To-Work (for less) state.

#10 | Posted by Danforth at 2017-11-25 10:21 PM

"No such thing as a free market in public education. Pretty sure that wouldn't be a good idea, but there are plenty of artificial barriers when it comes to licensing. Credentials are not qualifications."

Credentials are a valid attempt to qualify people to teach, a lack of credentials shows a lack of committment to the profession of teaching. There is more to teaching than knowing the subject matter. A teacher needs to know how to convey that information to the student and it is not all that easy. I remember some of my better teachers in HS to this day, they each had their own methods but I just remember that I didn't mind attending their classes and that I learned something in them. Then, I also had teachers whose classes I dreaded because they were so boring. I would say teaching is closer to an art than to a science.

#11 | Posted by danni at 2017-11-26 07:52 AM

What do they all have in common, the few that were excellent, the few that were truly awful, and the great majority that were so mediocre you can't even remember their names? They were all certified and credentialed.

#12 | Posted by visitor_ at 2017-11-26 08:50 AM

So your plan is to increase teacher quality by decreasing and/or eliminating the certification process? I'm not quite following.

#13 | Posted by dylanfan at 2017-11-26 02:13 PM

It's only about increasing quantity. The certification process has not been demonstrated to insure quality, to do that we'd need a better vetting process and the ability to fire the duds.

#14 | Posted by visitor_ at 2017-11-26 03:24 PM

"What do they all have in common, the few that were excellent, the few that were truly awful, and the great majority that were so mediocre you can't even remember their names? They were all certified and credentialed."

Ah yes, the Normal Distribution, or Bell Curve.

The certification process isn't about increasing quality. It's about ensuring basic competency.

#15 | Posted by snoofy at 2017-11-26 03:47 PM

"to do that we'd need a better vetting process"

I don't think the vetting process is particularly problematic.
Fingerprints, extensive background check; it's about as thorough as you can get.
If anything it's probably too invasive and keeps otherwise well qualified applicants away.

"and the ability to fire the duds."

Sounds good, until you try to do it.
To define what makes someone a dud; that's why we do all that testing.
But many will tell you the over-emphasis on testing is indicative of the problem.

#16 | Posted by snoofy at 2017-11-26 03:51 PM

How do you propose increasing raw numbers of people who are interested in the profession? The enrollment in teacher training programs in Wisconsin is down. How do we get enrollment up so we actually have some choice in eliminating the duds and vetting the candidates? So far lowering the bar hasn't seemed to work. Universities have already tried that; besides, it's counterintuitive to lower the bar in order to increase quality.

What's next?

#17 | Posted by dylanfan at 2017-11-26 03:54 PM

Well we haven't even mentioned the bureaucratic and administrative bs that sucks all enjoyment out of a difficult enough job. I looked into it as a second career and I'd need three years more education to be an alternative track probationary teacher. Thanks no thanks.

#18 | Posted by visitor_ at 2017-11-26 04:29 PM

"I looked into it as a second career and I'd need three years more education to be an alternative track probationary teacher. Thanks no thanks."

What if it paid triple, maybe you'd give it a chance?

#19 | Posted by snoofy at 2017-11-26 04:30 PM

I digress. My point is this: it seems as if the go-to solution in education in many places is to lower teacher's compensation, lower the requirements for being a teacher, and then complain about the lack of quality teachers.
#8 | Posted by dylanfan at 2017-11-25 09:37 PM |

And then complain about the immigrants needed to fill STEM jobs because they can't find qualified applicants.

#20 | Posted by morris at 2017-11-26 05:36 PM

"Well we haven't even mentioned the bureaucratic and administrative bs that sucks all enjoyment out of a difficult enough job. I looked into it as a second career and I'd need three years more education to be an alternative track probationary teacher. Thanks no thanks."

Yeah, a college degree is sort of required. Your GED won't enable you to be a teacher, I know, it's just not fair.

#21 | Posted by danni at 2017-11-27 08:51 AM

"It's only about increasing quantity. The certification process has not been demonstrated to insure quality, to do that we'd need a better vetting process and the ability to fire the duds."

What he really means is the ability to fire all the liberal teachers.

#22 | Posted by danni at 2017-11-27 08:52 AM

"What do they all have in common, the few that were excellent, the few that were truly awful, and the great majority that were so mediocre you can't even remember their names? They were all certified and credentialed."

And that the education I received enabled me to graduate from college cum laude and live a fairly successful life. I know some home schooled kids, not so lucky. Mom isn't certified and instead is a religious wacko. That doesn't give the kids the education they need to succeed in this world.

#23 | Posted by danni at 2017-11-27 08:53 AM

"The certification process has not been demonstrated to insure quality"

Just to see if you're tethered to reality...

If the certification process were scrapped, do you believe that would lead--in general--to better teachers, or worse teachers?

#24 | Posted by Danforth at 2017-11-27 08:57 AM

I would like to see studies that demonstrate the efficacy of the various certification rules, but by all means continue to defend a system that has been shown to not work. The goal is to preserve the bureaucracy and it's very successful at that.

Danni -- "Yeah, a college degree is sort of required. Your GED won't enable you to be a teacher, I know, it's just not fair." Ad hominem, but that's all you've got lately (look it up it's a new word for you).

Danni -- "And that the education I received enabled me to graduate from college cum laude and live a fairly successful life." Let me guess, state school, non STEM, nontraditional student?

#25 | Posted by visitor_ at 2017-11-27 11:25 AM

Sorry, I try to not slip into sarcasm, my apologies. I will try to be a better me.

#26 | Posted by visitor_ at 2017-11-27 11:28 AM

Harvard study estimated the value of a good kindergarden teacher at $320,000 a year.
www.huffingtonpost.com

Asia and Nordic countries get it. The US oligarchs want a retarded customer and voter base to harvest.

#27 | Posted by bored at 2017-11-27 12:43 PM

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