Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Craig Calcaterra, NBC Sports: the degree and intensity of patriotic display at sporting events has been dramatically ratcheted up since September 11, 2001. The big flags, the addition of "God Bless America" and the incorporation of the military into nearly every aspect of the promotion of the game. The impulse to do so was obvious and understandable, just as other patriotic displays in times of war, peril and tragedy are. The reasons for it make perfect sense and the escalation of conspicuous patriotism at the ballpark is unmistakable. Something else has happened over this same period, however. Patriotism has been transformed from something most Americans demonstrate out of natural national pride and personal motivation to something more ... performative. Often, something de rigueur. Unquestionably more political.

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[T]here has been some opportunism and performative patriotism at play at the ballpark as well. Most notably in the pay-for-patriotism scandal from a couple of years ago in which it was revealed that the government had paid teams to promote patriotic and pro-military initiatives for propaganda and recruitment purposes. Less craven than that but still calculated is the degree to which corporate sponsorship has seeped into patriotic activities. For the 2014 World Series, American flags were provided to every fan at the entrance of Kauffman Stadium. Major League Baseball made sure we knew in the press release, however, that they were "presented by Bank of America, the Official Bank of Major League Baseball." There are many examples of this sort of thing. ...

But let us not pretend for one second that displays of conspicuous patriotism haven't spiked dramatically in our country over the past 16 years. Let us not pretend for one second that they persist for all of the same reasons that initially inspired them. Let us not pretend that, over more than a decade and a half of it, many have not learned how effective it is to leverage patriotism to aid their political careers, their images, or their marketability and the marketability of their brands.

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The flag sure ain't the symbol of truth, fairness and freedom it once was to many people in the world.

#1 | Posted by pumpkinhead at 2017-04-17 12:55 PM | Reply

It's basically a live-action propaganda piece that you're expected to participate in.

If you don't fall for it, you're a traitor, spy, or something worse.

"Our land and people are more important, lovable, and productive than other lands or peoples."

#2 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2017-04-17 01:03 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Sports teams tap into the same tribal sentiment that feeds nationalism to extract money from the gullible.

#3 | Posted by bored at 2017-04-17 01:28 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2


@#3 Sports teams tap into the same tribal sentiment that feeds nationalism to extract money from the gullible.

Creating a similar, ~I don't care about the outcome so long as my team wins~, sentiment.

"Polarized politics" is just another way of describing the fact that our political process has become just another Sunday afternoon football game.

#4 | Posted by LampLighter at 2017-04-17 01:36 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Look at the debates from this last campaign, the way TV presented it, you couldn't tell the difference from the NFL.

#5 | Posted by TFDNihilist at 2017-04-17 03:19 PM | Reply

On topic, why does everything have to be a USA! USA! love fest? Are folks that insecure about their feelings that they have to be pumped up on the subject all the time. I love my country and want the best for it, but I don't need it shoved down my throat at every opportunity.

#6 | Posted by TFDNihilist at 2017-04-17 03:21 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

Keep it up en.wikipedia.org

#7 | Posted by MUSTANG at 2017-04-17 03:30 PM | Reply

American exceptionalism has become a commodity bought into by the intellectually weak-minded who are in constant need of a recurrent spectacle to legitimize their tribalist belief system and bring some sort of recognizable value to their limited existences.

#8 | Posted by pumpkinhead at 2017-04-17 03:42 PM | Reply

Thanks Bush. America used to be the most respected nation on Earth until the Iraq war.

#9 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2017-04-17 10:05 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

The flag is not political. There's no pro flag or anti flag party.

There are Americans who hate America and they sometime focus that hatred onto the flag.

#10 | Posted by jamesgelliott at 2017-04-18 02:16 PM | Reply

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There's no pro flag or anti flag party.

That's because the flag is just a piece of cloth and the real fight is about what it's supposed to represent.

Our sports have suffered from patriotic inflation for years. It's gotten so out of hand that the NFL was actually taking money from the U.S. government for some of its pro-military, pro-America ceremonies.

I love patriotism, but the growing demonstrations of patriotism and military fervor in sports make the sentiment seem less genuine. It starts to feel a little North Korean, where everyone has to show unwavering devotion to the state.

#11 | Posted by rcade at 2017-04-18 03:02 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 3

It's your attitude.

#12 | Posted by fresno500 at 2017-04-18 04:54 PM | Reply

From my Canadian perspective, you guys are flag crazy. I like our flag, but I don't start to hyperventilate if I don't have one in eyesight every second of my life.

I stopped for gas in a very small town in Idaho last fall. I counted 17 American flags from where I stood filling my truck, and not one of them was on a public building.

Seriously?

#13 | Posted by REDIAL at 2017-04-18 08:50 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

'Murica!

#14 | Posted by Whatsleft at 2017-04-18 10:04 PM | Reply

Colin Kaepernick.

#15 | Posted by memyselfini at 2017-04-19 01:15 AM | Reply

I wish the Texans would get Colin, but our owner is believed to be "too patriotic" to make such a move. What does that even mean?

#16 | Posted by memyselfini at 2017-04-19 01:18 AM | Reply

Lots of folks out there think they are 'patriots' because they wear a flag doo rag or t-shirt and think America is a great place to live, never having been more than about 300 miles from where they were born. They hang a flag from their front porch and know the lyrics to that Lee Greenwood song. But ask many of these phonies to sacrifice for others less fortunate than them, join the military or even pay higher taxes so as to fund better schools and roads and the person asking will get a lot of push-back and arguments that show these 'patriots' to be selfish dolts who wouldn't miss lunch for their country, mush less stand up to protect it or make it better for their fellow citizens...

#17 | Posted by catdog at 2017-04-19 08:45 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

What does that even mean?

#16 | POSTED BY MEMYSELFINI AT 2017-04-19 01:18 AM | FLAG:

No team is going to pick him up, it's not worth the hassle for a QB that peaked in 2013.

#18 | Posted by sitzkrieg at 2017-04-19 08:49 AM | Reply

It's basically a live-action propaganda piece that you're expected to participate in.

If you don't fall for it, you're a traitor, spy, or something worse.

"Our land and people are more important, lovable, and productive than other lands or peoples."

#2 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2017-04-17 01:03 PM | Reply

I could do without "God Bless America" at baseball games. But I doubt this has been your experience. If you use the seventh inning stretch to go to the restroom or concessions people think you're a spy? C'mon. Maybe if you just there and don't participate you will get some funny looks or if you're really unlucky, someone may say something. But most of the people in the stadium don't care what you do during the seventh innning stretch.

And to some extent, you should have a higher regard for your own community than for other communities. I don't know when the idea that not having caring about people with whom you share a common welfare is an admirable quality. To the extent that people distrust those who don't hold their family, friends, neighbors and community in a higher regards, it is because the distrust is deserved. 99% of globalist types are really just self interested sociopaths.

#19 | Posted by sully at 2017-04-19 09:27 AM | Reply

No team is going to pick him up, it's not worth the hassle for a QB that peaked in 2013.

Kaepernick is going to be signed. He threw for 16 touchdowns on four interceptions last year and had 2,241 yards passing, as well as two rushing touchdowns and 468 yards. There aren't enough good quarterbacks in the NFL. He'll be signed after the draft when a team knows its quarterback situation. I think the Jaguars would be better off with him than Blake Bortles.

For those who think the entire NFL fan base hates Kaepernick, his jersey was one of the top sellers last year.

#20 | Posted by rcade at 2017-04-19 10:00 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

That touchdown rate ranked him 25th of about 60 qb's. His stats though continue to trend downwards, his litany of injuries is extensive, and now he added political baggage on top of performance issues. You might be right, somebody might pick him up chasing bargains.

#21 | Posted by sitzkrieg at 2017-04-19 10:20 AM | Reply

Colin Kaepernick.
#15 | POSTED BY MEMYSELFINI

US Army/WWII vet and civil rights trailblazer Jackie Robinson said it best "I cannot stand and sing the anthem. I cannot salute the flag; I know that I am a black man in a white world. In 1972, in 1947, at my birth in 1919, I know that I never had it made."

#22 | Posted by johnny_hotsauce at 2017-04-19 11:09 AM | Reply

That touchdown rate ranked him 25th of about 60 qb's.

For the 49ers. Even Brady would have struggled there.

#23 | Posted by Whatsleft at 2017-04-19 11:17 AM | Reply

"That touchdown rate ranked him 25th of about 60 qb's."

Flacco, Wilson, and Manning's rates were all lower than that, and they've been to a total of 5 SBs, winning 4. Your point?

#24 | Posted by pumpkinhead at 2017-04-19 11:28 AM | Reply

On the chart I looked at all 3 had scores much higher.

Kap was only 2 spots above Osweiler, and the Texans offense is.. questionable at best.

#25 | Posted by sitzkrieg at 2017-04-19 12:21 PM | Reply

I wish the Texans would get Colin, but our owner is believed to be "too patriotic" to make such a move. What does that even mean?

#16 | Posted by memyselfini

It means the owner is too concerned with not offending people who are too stupid to know the difference between protesting police brutality vs protesting the US military.

#26 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2017-04-19 01:37 PM | Reply

And to some extent, you should have a higher regard for your own community than for other communities.

#19 | Posted by sully

Just like jesus said "love thy neighbor LESS THAN thy self." right?

#27 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2017-04-19 01:40 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

There are Americans who hate America and they sometime focus that hatred onto the flag.

#10 | Posted by jamesgelliott

Hating some of the evil things america does isn't the same as hating america.

Just like ignoring the evil things america does isn't the same as loving america.

#28 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2017-04-19 01:43 PM | Reply

= I think the Jaguars would be better off with him than Blake Bortles.

They shoulda traded for Romo.

#29 | Posted by Corky at 2017-04-19 01:45 PM | Reply

Just like jesus said "love thy neighbor LESS THAN thy self." right?

#27 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2017-04-19 01:40 PM | Reply |

Not sure that fictional dialogue attributed to someone hundreds years after his death has any relevance to this or antyhing else.

It is the normal state of affairs for human beings to form associations of people who help each other for the common good because we are horribly equipped to survive as solitary animals. Tribalism can be exploited in very harmful ways but it is a very natural and productive sentiment that has been vital to the survival of our species. Positioning yourself as being above such sentiments just makes you someone who wants to reap the rewards of living in a soceity while also reserving the right to abandone it in favor of another group when it suits your personal interests. In my experience people who outright reject feelings of community and tribalims also tend to have a contempt for others in general.

#30 | Posted by sully at 2017-04-19 02:06 PM | Reply

- fictional dialogue attributed to someone hundreds years after his death

More myth-information.

Quoted by the disciple Mark within 35-50 years of Jesus' death, probably less.

www.earlychristianwritings.com

lol, the second paragraph of the post sounds like a word salad for, "It Takes a Village".

Isolationists are funny up until they aren't.

#31 | Posted by Corky at 2017-04-19 02:20 PM | Reply

"More myth-information.

Quoted by the disciple Mark within 35-50 years of Jesus' death, probably less."

A distinction without a difference. I know we can't expect you to think at all - ever. But even you should be able to figure out that someone can't be quoted accurately if the first time his words are recorded is decades after his death.

"lol, the second paragraph of the post sounds like a word salad for, "It Takes a Village"."

Translation - Corky is generally butthurt with me and has a knee jerk need to voice disagreement whenever possible. But as is usually the case, Corky can't come up with a valid criticism this time.

#32 | Posted by Sully at 2017-04-19 03:39 PM | Reply

"Isolationists are funny up until they aren't." - Corky

So is Corky for free trade now since Hillary and Obama supported TPP or is he against it.

I'm confused Corky, please explain your position.

#33 | Posted by jamesgelliott at 2017-04-19 04:06 PM | Reply

Being against unfettered free trade doesn't make someone an isolationist.

#34 | Posted by danni at 2017-04-19 04:15 PM | Reply

- hundreds years after his death

- decades after his death.

Styrofoam goalposts. You back-peddle your lies faster than Sean Spicer on coke.

- someone can't be quoted accurately if the first time his words are recorded is decades after his death.

As proven by ancient manuscripts, ancient Hebrews and Jews, not necessarily the same thing, were able to keep extremely accurate verbal records for centuries at a time; records separated by hundreds of years with no written records kept were found to be almost exactly the same. And the Jews of Jesus' day had been doing it for several millenia by their time.

That these sayings were first "published" after decades for public use does not mean they were not recorded and kept by traditional verbal means prior.

- Corky can't come up with a valid criticism this time.

Just laughing at you again, that's all.

We all know that if someone lives outside of your eyesight, they don't exist for you. It's one of your more obnoxious Randian... er, "qualities".

#35 | Posted by Corky at 2017-04-19 04:51 PM | Reply

- I'm confused

That's been pretty obvious all along.

#36 | Posted by Corky at 2017-04-19 04:52 PM | Reply

Patriotism is a bumper sticker. On one side is says, "god bless America", and the sticky side says "---- everybody else".

#37 | Posted by BluSky at 2017-04-19 11:09 PM | Reply

As proven by ancient manuscripts, ancient Hebrews and Jews, not necessarily the same thing, were able to keep extremely accurate verbal records for centuries at a time; records separated by hundreds of years with no written records kept were found to be almost exactly the same. And the Jews of Jesus' day had been doing it for several millenia by their time.

That these sayings were first "published" after decades for public use does not mean they were not recorded and kept by traditional verbal means prior.

#35 | Posted by Corky at 2017-04-19 04:51 PM | Reply

As usual, you are lying here. There is no way to "prove" the accuracy of ancient manuscripts where it pertains to quotes attributed to individuals. Therefore, this isn't "proven" and your claim is an obvious lie.

Anyone who played "telephone" as a child understands how accurate verbal transmission of information from one person for another truly is.

Claiming that individual quotes can be transmitted accurately over hundres of years through verbal storytelling is beyond absurd. You mind well have claimed the authors of the Bible travelled through time and verified the quotes, which is just as feasible.

#38 | Posted by Sully at 2017-04-20 10:08 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

It means the owner is too concerned with not offending people who are too stupid to know the difference between protesting police brutality vs protesting the US military.

#26 | Posted by SpeakSoftly

Actually, they do know the difference; the problem is that they support police brutality.

#39 | Posted by WhoDaMan at 2017-04-20 10:37 AM | Reply

- Anyone who played "telephone" as a child

lol, you're still playing blogging like a child.

"The very identity and continued existence of the people of Israel were tied to a corpus of written and regularly read works in a way that simply was not true of other peoples in the Mediterranean world of the first century. . . To be able to read and explain the Scriptures was a revered goal for religiously minded Jews. Hence literacy held a special importance for the Jewish community." (4)

Thus, as Birger Gerhardsson argues, "the milieu in which Jesus and the original disciples ministered, and the milieu in which remembrances of Jesus' life and teaching were passed on, was one that revered the written word and thus valued literacy." (5)

One of the assumptions that is now being overturned in the discipline of orality studies is the longstanding idea that oral traditions are incapable of transmitting extended narratives. It was commonly assumed that long narratives simply would have been too difficult to remember to be passed on reliably.

Unfortunately for this assumption, a large number of fieldwork studies over the last several decades have "brought to light numerous long oral epics in the living traditions of Central Asia, India, Africa, and Oceania, for example."

Hence, argues Lauri Honko, "[t]he existence of genuine long oral epics can no longer be denied." (6) In fact, oral narratives lasting up to 25 hours and requiring several days to perform have been documented! (7) Indeed, oral performances -- that is, times when the community's narrator (or "tradent") passes on oral traditions to the community -- almost always presuppose a broader narrative framework even when the narrative itself is not explicitly included in the performance. (8)

There is, therefore, no longer any reason to suspect that the narrative framework of Jesus' life was the fictional creation of the Gospel authors."

- See more at: reknew.org

#40 | Posted by Corky at 2017-04-20 12:37 PM | Reply

"- These short sayings circulated by word of mouth for some 20 years before being written down.

This in itself is a supposition without evidence, used with the presuppositions of the Seminar that only sayings that they determine have originated in the so-called oral period (30-50) could possibly have come from Jesus [Funk.5Q, 24], and that oral transmission is so primitive that it cannot reliably transmit anything except short, memorable phrases.

This presumption ignores any possibility that sayings, stories and sermons were put in some kind of written form early on and it also ignores the considerable importance given to rote memorization in Jewish society of the time, which would have permitted reliable oral transmission even for longer material. Henaut

Oral recall was far more important in ancient socities, particularly Judaism, than we have commonly allowed for and the techniques used for memorization by ancient societies as a whole has a remarkable similarity to techniques promulgated by today's "memory improvement" seminars we now pay exorbitant fees to attend. Byrskog notes that "...as we know today from modern studies of visual memory, most people recall -- correctly or not -- the past through images impressed on their memory.

The ancient people were aware of this basic, human characteristic." He also reports exceptional (and very likely exaggerated, in some cases) examples from ancient texts of memory feats [162-3]:"

www.tektonics.org

You have no idea what you are talking about, as per usual.

#41 | Posted by Corky at 2017-04-20 12:41 PM | Reply

#40-41 | Posted by Corky

None of these walls of text support the claim you made in #35 re: "proven" accuracy.

You are using your tired strategy of bombarding us with irrelevant information that does not fully support your claim - or in this case your lie.

And as usual, you're fooling nobody.

#42 | Posted by Sully at 2017-04-20 12:51 PM | Reply

Kaepernick wouldn't save the Texans, or any other team in the NFL, from a losing season.

#43 | Posted by GOnoles92 at 2017-04-20 01:02 PM | Reply

- you're fooling nobody.

When you claim that something was "fictional" because it was written several hundred years later, which it wasn't, then to CYA say that it doesn't matter that you were proven wrong about that timeline because it was written a few decades, if that, latter... well, no one is fooled by that.

Particularly given the accuracy of the history of Jewish oral and written traditions.

Pretending that Speaks was off base by quoting a variation of the brief saying, "love your neighbor as yourself" because it could not actually be a quote because it was written down later... as if that were something other than a Deflection to what he was saying about your isolationist tendencies.... is merely another of your absurd obfuscations as you seem to be perpetually walking back the stupid .... you say to a lot of different people here.

Which is why you get called on it so often by so many.

#44 | Posted by Corky at 2017-04-20 04:34 PM | Reply

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