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Monday, March 20, 2017

Not being a complete Trump supporter, I don't think he wants war with N.K. Having served in Vietnam, I don't think any sane solider of civilian actually wants war.

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There is this area of surface of our planet called North Korea.

It's leader is bat crap crazy.

What do you do?

We are all on this blue marble.
www.nasa.gov

As you look at that Blue Marble, you realize that all of human history has taken place upon that fragile spot in the universe.

Everything we know.

When that Blue Marble disappears, what goes of us?

What happens to humanity as we know it?

#1 | Posted by LampLighter at 2017-03-20 10:49 PM | Reply

When that Blue Marble disappears, what goes of us?

The marble will be fine.

#2 | Posted by REDIAL at 2017-03-20 10:55 PM | Reply

When that Blue Marble disappears, what goes of us?
What happens to humanity as we know it?

What goes of us?

Voyager I and Voyager II sailing way into space. That's all.

#3 | Posted by jpw at 2017-03-20 11:39 PM | Reply

Never gonna happen.

Why?

Because China said so.

#4 | Posted by ClownShack at 2017-03-20 11:43 PM | Reply


@#2 The marble will be fine.

Our sun is not a permanent object. It will die. Not in your lifetime, nor in my lifetime. But it will die.

So, what becomes of our Blue Marble as the Sun expands to encompass our Blue Marble in its hot gaseous reactions?

How do your descendants plan to survive?

Note: denial of occurrence is not, and has never been, a defense.

Or don't you care about your children's children's children's [etc] future?

I'm reminded of the 1969 album... The Moody Blues - To Our Children's, Children's, Children

#5 | Posted by LampLighter at 2017-03-20 11:44 PM | Reply

How do your descendants plan to survive?

Technology.

or death.

Who's to say humanity makes it to the point where the sun blows up.

I'm sure the dinosaurs weren't expecting extinction either.

#6 | Posted by ClownShack at 2017-03-20 11:47 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1


@#6 ... Who's to say humanity makes it to the point where the sun blows up. ...

An erudite observation, for which I wish I had an answer.

But I don't.

Anyone?

#7 | Posted by LampLighter at 2017-03-20 11:55 PM | Reply

Technology is (again) my answer.

Extending our lives through medical and scientific research. Through cybernetics.

But. That precludes any unforeseen natural or unnatural catastrophes. Life ending type events. Such as a worldwide nuclear winter, or the moon colliding with the earth.

As for the blue marble. We are desperately intent on evacuating it. Somehow. Anyhow.

If we figure it out.

And everything else goes well.

Our descendants may survive.

#8 | Posted by ClownShack at 2017-03-21 12:19 AM | Reply


@#8 ... Extending our lives through medical and scientific research. Through cybernetics. ...

But doesn't that presume that there will be a place in our area of the universe for that to occur?

Is our inhabitation of distant planets a given? A need for the survival of our very being? What is our very being?

The last five minutes of the last episode of Dr Carl Sagan's 1980 Cosmos series on PBS were a turning pint for me. Dr Sagan expressed our conundrum more clearly and succinctly that I've ever heard it previously. As much as I spend quality time in google, I cannot find a transcript of his phenomenally amazing insightful commentary.... {sigh}

#9 | Posted by LampLighter at 2017-03-21 12:42 AM | Reply


were a turning pint for me

should be

were a turning point for me

#10 | Posted by LampLighter at 2017-03-21 12:43 AM | Reply

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succinctly that I've

should be

succinctly than I've

OK, I'll try to proof read before I publish, rather than after. :)

#11 | Posted by LampLighter at 2017-03-21 12:45 AM | Reply

But doesn't that presume that there will be a place in our area of the universe for that to occur?

The advancements in medicine technology and genetics makes me believe cybernetics isn't a foregone conclusion.

Is our inhabitation of distant planets a given? A need for the survival of our very being?

If we assume humans outlive the sun? (Unless we assume humans figure out how to prevent the sun from dying. But let's not for the sake of simplicity.) Then yes. We would have to. Plus they announced those 7 planets. Interstellar!!

What is our very being?

Very deep.

If you ever find the transcripts. Or a link to a clip. I'd be happy to check it out.

#12 | Posted by ClownShack at 2017-03-21 02:49 AM | Reply

#9 Is it this one?

"As the ancient mythmakers knew, we are children equally of the earth and the sky. In our tenure on this planet we've accumulated dangerous evolutionary baggage: propensities for aggression and ritual, submission to leaders, hostility to outsiders, all of which puts our survival in some doubt. But we've also acquired passion for others, love for our children, desire to learn from history and experience, and a great, soaring, passionate intelligence, the clear tools for our continued survival and prosperity. Which aspects of our nature will prevail is uncertain."

#13 | Posted by MUSTANG at 2017-03-21 08:14 AM | Reply

#9 Ah, here we go [Part 1]:

Whatever is inconsistent with the facts no matter how fond of it we are must be discarded or revised. Science is not perfect. It's often misused. It's only a tool. But it's the best tool we have self-correcting, ever-changing applicable to everything. With this tool, we vanquish the impossible. With the methods of science we have begun to explore the cosmos. For the first time, scientific discoveries are widely accessible. Our machines the products of science are now beyond the orbit of Saturn. A preliminary spacecraft reconnaissance has been made of 20 new worlds.

We have learned to value careful observations to respect the facts, even when they are disquieting when they seem to contradict conventional wisdom. The Canterbury monks faithfully recorded an impact on the moon and the Anasazi people, an explosion of a distant star. They saw for us as we see for them.

We see further than they only because we stand on their shoulders.
We build on what they knew.
We depend on free inquiry and free access to knowledge.
We humans have seen the atoms which constitute all of matter and the forces that sculpt this world and others.
We know the molecules of life are easily formed under conditions common throughout the cosmos.
We have mapped the molecular machines at the heart of life.
We have discovered a microcosm in a drop of water.
We have peered into the bloodstream and down on our stormy planet to see the Earth as a single organism.
We have found volcanoes on other worlds and explosions on the sun; studied comets from the depths of space and traced their origins and destinies; listened to pulsars and searched for other civilizations.
We humans have set foot on another world in a place called the Sea of Tranquility - an astonishing achievement for creatures such as we whose earliest footsteps are preserved in the volcanic ash of East Africa.
We have walked far.

These are some of the things that hydrogen atoms do given 15 billion years of cosmic evolution. It has the sound of epic myth. But it's simply a description of the evolution of the cosmos as revealed by science in our time.

And we we who embody the local eyes and ears and thoughts and feelings of the cosmos we've begun, at last, to wonder about our origins. Star stuff, contemplating the stars organized collections of 10 billion- billion-billion atoms contemplating the evolution of matter tracing that long path by which it arrived at consciousness here on the planet Earth and perhaps, throughout the cosmos.

Our loyalties are to the species and the planet. We speak for Earth.

#14 | Posted by MUSTANG at 2017-03-21 08:30 AM | Reply

Part 2:

Our obligation to survive and flourish is owed not just to ourselves but also to that cosmos, ancient and vast from which we spring. The greatest thrill for me in reliving this adventure has been not just that we've completed the preliminary reconnaissance with spacecraft of the entire solar system. And not just that we've discovered astonishing structures in the realm of the galaxies but especially that some of Cosmos' boldest dreams about this world are coming closer to reality. Since this series' maiden voyage the impossible has come to pass. Mighty walls that maintained insuperable ideological differences have come tumbling down. Deadly enemies have embraced and begun to work together. The imperative to cherish the Earth and to protect the global environment that sustains all of us has become widely accepted. And we've begun, finally the process of reducing the obscene number of weapons of mass destruction. Perhaps we have, after all decided to choose life.

But we still have light-years to go to ensure that choice even after the summits and the ceremonies and the treaties.
There are still some 50,000 nuclear weapons in the world. And it would require the detonation of only a tiny fraction of them to produce a nuclear winter the predicted global climatic catastrophe that would result from the smoke and dust lifted into the atmosphere by burning cities and petroleum facilities. The world's scientific community has begun to sound the alarm about the grave dangers posed by depleting the protective ozone shield and by greenhouse warming. And again, we're taking some mitigating steps. But again, those steps are too small and too slow. The discovery that such a thing as nuclear winter was really possible evolved out of studies of Martian dust storms. The surface of Mars, fried by ultraviolet light is also a reminder of why it's important to keep our ozone layer intact. The runaway greenhouse effect on Venus is a valuable reminder that we must take the increasing greenhouse effect on Earth seriously. Important lessons about our environment have come from spacecraft missions to the planets. By exploring other worlds we safeguard this one.

By itself, this fact more than justifies the money our species has spent in sending ships to other worlds. It is our fate to live during one of the most perilous and one of the most hopeful chapters in human history. Our science and our technology have posed us a profound question: Will we learn to use these tools with wisdom and foresight before it's too late? Will we see our species safely through this difficult passage so that our children and grandchildren will continue the great journey of discovery still deeper into the mysteries of the cosmos? That same rocket and nuclear and computer technology that sends our ships past the farthest known planet can also be used to destroy our global civilization. Exactly the same technology can be used for good and for evil.

It is as if there were a god who said to us: "I set before you two ways. You can use your technology to destroy yourselves or to carry you to the planets and the stars.

It's up to you.

#15 | Posted by MUSTANG at 2017-03-21 08:30 AM | Reply

It's leader is bat crap crazy.

#1 | POSTED BY LAMPLIGHTER AT 2017-03-20 10:49 PM | FLAG:

This is a continual, gross misunderstanding of North Korea used to marginalize them and press the case for military action against them.

They're not crazy. Their leadership is 3 generations removed from the actual war that created their circumstances, and have extensive educations in Europe's finest colleges. They're doing what they believe they need to do to remain in power.

#16 | Posted by sitzkrieg at 2017-03-22 09:23 AM | Reply

"They're doing what they believe they need to do to remain in power." - #16 | Posted by sitzkrieg at 2017-03-22 09:23 AM

As described here:

Iron Law of Institutions

The people who control institutions care first and foremost about their power within the institution rather than the power of the institution itself. Thus, they would rather the institution "fail" while they remain in power within the institution than for the institution to "succeed" if that requires them to lose power within the institution.

-or-

"It is better to rule in hell than to serve in heaven." - John Milton

#17 | Posted by Hans at 2017-03-22 09:38 AM | Reply

Who's to say humanity makes it to the point where the sun blows up.

The sun has billions of years left. It is not even at half it's estimated life.

Humanity is not that lucky.

At the rate the human population is growing and consuming resources, it will be long gone before then. Might not even last the next hundred years. At some point the strain on the ecosystem will become too great and then it will reset. Disease, starvation, war or technology will wipe us out.

Everything we were, everything we hoped to be gone.

#18 | Posted by 726 at 2017-03-22 12:05 PM | Reply

We've survived many extinction events. There is a reason virtually every society has a great flood myth.

#19 | Posted by sitzkrieg at 2017-03-22 01:21 PM | Reply

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