Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Thursday, November 24, 2016

Actor, writer and comic legend Steve Martin gets serious to discuss his latest project, Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk, about the early days of the Iraq War -- a subject he sees sticking around for quite some time in Hollywood. In the film -- directed by Ang Lee and co-starring Kristen Stewart, Vin Diesel and Joe Alwyn -- Martin plays Norm Oglesby, the owner of a fictional professional football team. Martin told CBS News that there's a very good reason the NFL didn't license its name and team logos for use in the film. "Of course the NFL wouldn't want to be represented in the movie -- although I think they're fairly represented, you know? There is an element in the movie where the football players kind of thought of themselves as being in a war and the young soldiers are thinking, "You're not in a war, war's very different."

Advertisement

Advertisement

Liberal Blog Advertising Network

More

Comments

Admin's note: Participants in this discussion must follow the site's moderation policy. Profanity will be filtered. Abusive conduct is not allowed.

I saw this film the other night and it certainly isn't your typical war movie. Focused on detailing the idiosyncrasies and struggles of a combat unit's "hero's parade" through the US, it tells the story of how the 'the worst day of a soldier's life,' became part of "America's story regarding the heroism of our men and women overseas."

#1 | Posted by GOnoles92 at 2016-11-23 02:36 PM | Reply

There is an element in the movie where the football players kind of thought of themselves as being in a war and the young soldiers are thinking, "You're not in a war, war's very different."

You mean like the war on poverty? Drugs? Why don't we make those sorts of comparisons as well?

I see no problem with calling it a "war" in the NFL, I can see where the NFL wouldn't like the comparison without clarification to the uneducated, unenlightened. Most people know the difference, but if it helps get them up for the game.

That being said, I would be interested in seeing this movie.....

#2 | Posted by AndreaMackris at 2016-11-23 04:14 PM | Reply

I see no problem with calling it a "war" in the NFL, I can see where the NFL wouldn't like the comparison without clarification to the uneducated, unenlightened. Most people know the difference...

I agree on that aspect. I didn't/don't want to be too specific and provide a spoiler for a climatic moment within the movie, but there are a few other scenes which can be viewed more controversially when taken in context of the relationship between the armed forces and the NFL entertainment industry.

#3 | Posted by GOnoles92 at 2016-11-23 04:35 PM | Reply

I didn't/don't want to be too specific

So your just a pitch man :)

Heading to Florida next week, hows the weather been ....

#4 | Posted by AndreaMackris at 2016-11-23 05:27 PM | Reply

After my military commitment, I can't watch these type of movies.

I just can't. It's my weak spot.

It's better to leave some things behind.

It is sad we try to humanize the indefenseable.

#5 | Posted by Prolix247 at 2016-11-23 11:41 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 3

I agree on that aspect.

I can't.

I had to turn off the world series because of the language they used constantly referencing war/battles ect.

The line that finally did it for me was in the final game the commentator said something along the lines of "it's a war of attrition" and I said "---- you" and turned it off.

It's no where close the a war of attrition, ie WWI. Those are a bunch of over-paid athletes playing a ------- game. They NEVER deserve comparisons to war/battles, the description of hero or any other over-inflated nonsense.

#6 | Posted by jpw at 2016-11-24 09:22 PM | Reply

Comments are closed for this entry.

Home | Breaking News | Comments | User Blogs | Stats | Back Page | RSS Feed | RSS Spec | DMCA Compliance | Privacy | Copyright 2016 World Readable

-->
Drudge Retort