Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Wednesday, November 23, 2016

Some people are all about the stuffing. Some can't do without the mashed potatoes. The debate over marshmallows with the sweet potatoes can stoke family feuds spanning decades. But at the end of the day, Thanksgiving is all about the bird. Because face it, the turkey is the centerpiece. Getting it right -- delivering a succulent, perfectly browned, magazine-worthy specimen -- presents the holiday's biggest challenge. To unlock the secrets of roasting a great bird, the Associated Press asked some of the country's top chefs and food experts the tough questions: To brine or not to brine? High-heat or slow roast? Basted or not? Then AP took the suggestions the writers liked best and combined them into one recipe that is simple, foolproof and produces a delicious and beautiful bird. Looking for a classic recipe that delivers serious payoff?

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Well, I tried to attach a poll to this, but it's not working.

How will you be preparing your Thanksgiving Turkey?

1) Oven Roasted
2) Deep Fried
3) Smoked
4) Other

We're just doing a breast in the oven. :)

#1 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2016-11-23 12:35 PM | Reply

I have to disagree with the article. I have tried all three off Sheeple's list, and the best I've had is an oven-roasted turkey that has been spatchcocked.

www.marthastewart.com

The turkey cooks much more quickly and evenly and is moister than even a deep-fried turkey (which are also pretty damned tasty). It's all I've done for the last three years, and I doubt I will try any other method ever again.

#2 | Posted by MUSTANG at 2016-11-23 12:59 PM | Reply

OTHER: Rock Cornish Game Hens glazed with balsamic vinegar stuffed with wild rice with french style green beans with slivered almonds on the side. A bottle White Star before dinner and a White Bordeaux [Château Larrivet-Haut-Brion Pessac-Léognan] to accompany dinner. Desert will be what is called a Blueberry Angel food Trifle. Can't Wait!

#3 | Posted by MSgt at 2016-11-23 01:00 PM | Reply

- the best I've had is an oven-roasted turkey that has been spatchcocked.

Awesome! I'm going to try that with the breast I bought. :D

#4 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2016-11-23 01:12 PM | Reply

Here's the best way. Find someone else to cook the dinner and you don't get stuck cleaning up any mess.

#5 | Posted by LauraMohr at 2016-11-23 01:24 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 3

Here's how to cook the perfect turkey

Here's how ...

youtu.be

#6 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2016-11-23 01:33 PM | Reply

My sister's frying ours. Not my fave but its her thing.

I usually brine mine with seasonings then head to the smoker with apple or pecan wood.

#7 | Posted by lfthndthrds at 2016-11-23 01:36 PM | Reply

1 smoked, 1 oven roasted, in a bag to keep it moist.
Also 1 smoked salmon slab for dip.

#8 | Posted by Whizzo at 2016-11-23 01:44 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Deep fried! CajunPower inject and seasoning...

#9 | Posted by AndreaMackris at 2016-11-23 02:12 PM | Reply

I usually brine mine with seasonings then head to the smoker with apple or pecan wood.

#7 | POSTED BY LFTHNDTHRDS

That's exactly what I am doing.

#10 | Posted by JeffJ at 2016-11-23 02:53 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

Advertisement

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1. Beat her in the Primaries
2. Beat her in the General Election.

Proof positive -it's happened twice.

#11 | Posted by Petrous at 2016-11-23 02:54 PM | Reply | Funny: 1

Best one I had was done by my dad, it was brined and smoked. (#7 and #10 know wtf they're talking about)

The "brine" (or marinade, whatever) was an odd concoction, not sure everything that was in it, but I know it included Old Bay, cayenne, Fat Tire beer, a ton of garlic among other things. Turkey was put on the smoker stuffed with Andouille sausage, onions, and peppers. It sounds weird but it was great.

For those doing the smoking (Lft, Jeff, etc.), how does the turkey skin turn out on yours?

#12 | Posted by LIVE_OR_DIE at 2016-11-23 03:19 PM | Reply

#12

Deep mahogany with some crispiness.

#13 | Posted by JeffJ at 2016-11-23 03:21 PM | Reply

How hot do you run your smoker?

#14 | Posted by LIVE_OR_DIE at 2016-11-23 03:22 PM | Reply

Also 1 smoked salmon slab for dip.
#8 | Posted by Whizzo at 2016-11-23 01:44 PM

Sounds damn good.

#15 | Posted by LIVE_OR_DIE at 2016-11-23 03:23 PM | Reply

Deep mahogany with some crispiness. #13 | POSTED BY JEFFJ
Damn.... how I feel about that description:
youtu.be

#16 | Posted by GOnoles92 at 2016-11-23 03:30 PM | Reply

The "brine" (or marinade, whatever) was an odd concoction...

I LOVE odd concoctions. what sucks is, it's hard to find that exact same one again.

#17 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2016-11-23 03:40 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

How hot do you run your smoker?

#14 | POSTED BY LIVE_OR_DIE

I run it 300-350 for a bird.

Spare ribs, brisket, beef short ribs, corned beef brisket (Pastrami) chuck roast, pork butt - I like to run it in the 240-280 range.

Baby back ribs in the 220-250 range.

#18 | Posted by JeffJ at 2016-11-23 04:48 PM | Reply

Whole birds are the only time I use a wet brine.

Everything else I just hit with kosher salt at a minimum of an hour before going into the cooker. Ideally, a day or more ahead. When I buy meat that is going into the freezer I dry-brine it first. Meat is very dense. Salt is the only spice that is capable of truly penetrating the meat. When done in advance it gives the meat a fully seasoned taste and it changes the cell structure of the meat causing it to hold more water. It doesn't take much salt either - about half a teaspoon of kosher salt per pound of meat. Needless to say, I don't use any salt in my BBQ rubs because I will have already salted the meat prior to applying the rub.

#19 | Posted by JeffJ at 2016-11-23 04:52 PM | Reply

For those of you interested in smoking fish....have a separate smoker for that. Fish oil is REALLY hard to get out of the smoker and it will impart on future cooks.

#20 | Posted by JeffJ at 2016-11-23 04:54 PM | Reply

Turn the heat in Trump tower up to 450 for the first hour then turn down to 350 for 4 hours. The uappetizing orange should become a rich golden brown by then. His unusually high fat content ensures he will self baste.

#21 | Posted by hatter5183 at 2016-11-23 05:25 PM | Reply

#18 | POSTED BY JEFFJ

Something I have learned this year about cooking/smoking/broiling all meat is evaporative cooling.
www.genuineideas.com

Once the meat is seared on the outside, like you want, the temp will rise then stall for a period of time. What is happening is it needs to evaporate more water to raise the temp, given outside the meat humidity. So wrap it in foil, driving up the humidity inside the foil, and keep heating until desired temperature.

This has worked wonders it actually speeds up the cooking time, and keeps the meats moist.

Fish oil is REALLY hard to get out of the smoker and it will impart on future cooks.
#20 | POSTED BY JEFFJ

This is why I have an electric smoker for fish, and my GreenEgg for Pork/Beef.

#22 | Posted by AndreaMackris at 2016-11-23 05:35 PM | Reply

My preference is frozen turkey dropped in deep fryer.

#23 | Posted by Sycophant at 2016-11-23 05:44 PM | Reply

My preference is frozen turkey dropped in deep fryer.

#23 | POSTED BY SYCOPHANT

It like fried ice cream from what I have heard.

#24 | Posted by AndreaMackris at 2016-11-23 05:53 PM | Reply

How hot do you run your smoker?

#14 | POSTED BY LIVE_OR_DIE AT 2016-11-23 03:22 PM | FLAG:

LOD the skin gets darker depending on the use of a rub. a brown sugar based rub will get it very dark.

I try to keep my smoker temp as close to 250 as possible and I have a water pan under mine.

I use a digital thermometer so I can monitor outside the smoker. be sure to calibrate in ice water before trusting one of those things.

#25 | Posted by lfthndthrds at 2016-11-23 07:10 PM | Reply

and no more than 1 beer an a hour while tending!

#26 | Posted by lfthndthrds at 2016-11-23 07:11 PM | Reply

This is why I have an electric smoker for fish, and my GreenEgg for Pork/Beef.

#22 | POSTED BY ANDREAMACKRIS

I also have an electric which I use for niche purposes.

I do not have a kamado like your Big Green Egg.

I have the smallest (14.5" diameter) Weber Smokey Mountain and I have 2 Weber kettle grills. I use an accessory in the kettles called Slow N Sear, which turns the kettle into a truly indirect smoker. I just did 2 4 pound pork butts in the smaller of my 2 kettles last Friday.

Once the meat is seared on the outside, like you want, the temp will rise then stall for a period of time.

Unsurprisingly, it's known as "the stall". With cuts of meat like chuck roast, brisket and pork butt the stall can last for several hours.

Once the meat is seared on the outside, like you want, the temp will rise then stall for a period of time. What is happening is it needs to evaporate more water to raise the temp, given outside the meat humidity. So wrap it in foil, driving up the humidity inside the foil, and keep heating until desired temperature.
This has worked wonders it actually speeds up the cooking time, and keeps the meats moist.

This is known as 'the Texas Crutch'. I just call it 'wrapping'. It IS a good way to speed up the cook. Just make sure your meat has established good bark before wrapping. Fattier cuts really don't need it to maintain a moist texture and you get better bark without it. I only use it when I am running short on time.

Also, you do NOT want billowing white smoke. You want thin blue smoke and with a small, hot fire it can take upwards of 45 minutes to achieve blue smoke. Be patient and don't put the meat in until the smoke is blue.

Keep your meat cold. Keep it in the 'fridge until just before it goes into the smoker. Smoke only sticks to cold and/or wet meat.

#27 | Posted by JeffJ at 2016-11-23 07:17 PM | Reply

I use a digital thermometer so I can monitor outside the smoker. be sure to calibrate in ice water before trusting one of those things.

#25 | POSTED BY LFTHNDTHRDS

An absolute must IMO. I have 2 Maverick digital thermometers. One probe measures the temperature at the grate (in a kettle grill temps can be as much as 80 degrees hotter at the dome - I never rely on the dome thermometer) and the other measures the internal temperature of the meat. The transmitter broadcasts to a receiver up to 300 feet away. I usually keep the receiver in my pocket.

#28 | Posted by JeffJ at 2016-11-23 07:21 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Water pans act as a heat sink which helps maintain steady temperatures and also helps create a humid cooking environment.

Too much humidity isn't desirable though as it slows the development of bark.

To clarify #28 each thermometer has 2 probes (one for cooking chamber temp and one for meat internal temp).

LFTHNDTHRDS,

What kind of cooker(s) are you working with?

#29 | Posted by JeffJ at 2016-11-23 07:25 PM | Reply

"I have 2 Maverick digital thermometers"

Bragger!!

#30 | Posted by lfthndthrds at 2016-11-23 07:26 PM | Reply

LFTHNDTHRDS,
What kind of cooker(s) are you working with?

#29 | POSTED BY JEFFJ AT 2016-11-23 07:25 PM | FLAG:

Weber Smokey Mountain these days.

#31 | Posted by lfthndthrds at 2016-11-23 07:27 PM | Reply

"I have 2 Maverick digital thermometers"
Bragger!!

#30 | POSTED BY LFTHNDTHRDS

A couple of weeks ago I had both of them going. I was doing 2 chuck roasts in my Smokey Mountain and was monitoring the temps of both as well as the cooking chamber temp.

#32 | Posted by JeffJ at 2016-11-23 07:28 PM | Reply

Which size WSM?

#33 | Posted by JeffJ at 2016-11-23 07:28 PM | Reply

18.5"

#34 | Posted by lfthndthrds at 2016-11-23 07:29 PM | Reply

It wasn't practical to go with the 22" for just me and the wife.

#35 | Posted by lfthndthrds at 2016-11-23 07:30 PM | Reply

Here is something I encourage you to try:

A whole chicken on the top rack with the water pan removed. Fill a chimney and when it's half-lit throw it in the charcoal ring. Don't use any wood. The skin gets super dark and crisp and it drips right into the coals. On the top rack it's far enough away that the drippings won't cause flames - they just create "grill smoke".

#36 | Posted by JeffJ at 2016-11-23 07:31 PM | Reply

The 22 is HUGE. The 18.5 is excellent.

Last year I debated between the 22 WSM and the 26.75 kettle. I debated hard and ultimately went with the kettle (I already had the 14.5 WSM at the time of the debate). With the Slow N sear I can still fit a lot of meat on the grate and I have a hover grill which increases capacity.

#37 | Posted by JeffJ at 2016-11-23 07:33 PM | Reply

#36 | POSTED BY JEFFJ AT 2016-11-23 07:31 PM | FLAG:

Thank you for the info never tried that with chicken but will.

My sons came a few months back and i did that with rubbed ribs and it turned out pretty good.

I have a couple of pork shoulders I want to do that with for New Years. What do you think?

#38 | Posted by lfthndthrds at 2016-11-23 07:34 PM | Reply

I have the 22.5" kettle and the 18.5" WSM

#39 | Posted by lfthndthrds at 2016-11-23 07:35 PM | Reply

and no more than 1 beer an a hour while tending!
#26 | POSTED BY LFTHNDTHRDS AT 2016-11-23 07:11 PM

Good call. Filling up on too much beer won't leave room for the whiskey.

#40 | Posted by LIVE_OR_DIE at 2016-11-23 07:38 PM | Reply

I have a couple of pork shoulders I want to do that with for New Years. What do you think?

#38 | POSTED BY LFTHNDTHRDS

It should work doing it that way for a pork butt. Just keep in mind that the bowl acts as a heat diffuser so if you remove it you'll need to flip the butts a couple of times.

I also have a 22.5" Performer kettle, with the cart, charcoal hopper and propane ignition.

If you have a 22.5 kettle take a serious look at the Slow n Sear. Smoking in the kettle requires less set up than the WSM. Also, it works similarly to charcoal baskets for 'regular cooks'. With one exception: It's designed to channel the heat straight up which creates a nuclear hot sear-zone which is perfect for a reverse-sear.

#41 | Posted by JeffJ at 2016-11-23 07:50 PM | Reply

won't leave room for the whiskey.

#40 | POSTED BY LIVE_OR_DIE AT 2016-11-23 07:38 PM | FLAG:

NEWSWORTHY

#42 | Posted by lfthndthrds at 2016-11-23 07:55 PM | Reply

#41 | POSTED BY JEFFJ AT 2016-11-23 07:50 PM | FLAG:

good info! Thanks Jeff

#43 | Posted by lfthndthrds at 2016-11-23 07:55 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

If you are going to do it that way for a pork butt I would run it at 280-300.

Cooking meat 'naked' like that works really well in the Pit Barrel Cooker. It should work just as well in a WSM.

#44 | Posted by JeffJ at 2016-11-23 08:13 PM | Reply

#43

It is the single greatest accessory available for the Weber kettle.

I use mine for most of my cooks.

#45 | Posted by JeffJ at 2016-11-23 08:14 PM | Reply

Happy thanksgiving bitches.

#46 | Posted by eberly at 2016-11-23 08:57 PM | Reply

Happy thanksgiving bitches.

#46 | POSTED BY EBERLY AT 2016-11-23 08:57 PM | FLAG:

Backatcha skank.

#47 | Posted by lfthndthrds at 2016-11-23 08:59 PM | Reply

Cooking meat 'naked' like that works really well in the Pit Barrel Cooker. It should work just as well in a WSM.

#44 | POSTED BY JEFFJ AT 2016-11-23 08:13 PM | FLAG:

Have any sites where I can shop the barrel?

#48 | Posted by lfthndthrds at 2016-11-23 09:01 PM | Reply

Sounds damn good.
#15 | LIVE_OR_DIE

It's a simple recipe, smoked salmon, cream cheese, green onion and cajun seasoning. Adjust the quantities until it tastes good.
We make it several times a year when we smoke. We always make a big batch at Thanksgiving.

#49 | Posted by Whizzo at 2016-11-23 09:25 PM | Reply

#48

Go to Amazinribs.com

They have a lengthy review of it.

#50 | Posted by JeffJ at 2016-11-23 09:57 PM | Reply

You order it on Amazon.

For $299 it shows up at your door, shipping included.

All you have to do is set the bottom vent according to where you are at sea level and it's ready to go.

It has one removable grate that won't get used much. It has 4 holes near the top where 2 bars are slid through. It comes with a set of hooks and you hang the meat over the fire. I kid you not. People that have these things absolutely swear by them.

#51 | Posted by JeffJ at 2016-11-23 10:02 PM | Reply

Unsurprisingly, it's known as "the stall". - JeffJ

Yes, which got me interested in the problem :)

This is known as 'the Texas Crutch'. I just call it 'wrapping'.

No one discusses this in the cooking shows, I watched the primal grill, and BBQ tournament shows, forever never heard of it. Nulli never taught me this either.

But my investigation of the problem with my own thermometer probe and Android software I could see what was happening. I wondered how to solve it.

#52 | Posted by AndreaMackris at 2016-11-23 10:07 PM | Reply

If you are going to do it that way for a pork butt I would run it at 280-300.

In my GreenEgg that is high.... I like 250, seems to work well. Wrap on good "bark" as you say.

#53 | Posted by AndreaMackris at 2016-11-23 10:10 PM | Reply

No one discusses this in the cooking shows,

Best outdoor cooking site on the net: Amazingribs.com

I'm a member of their Pit Master Club.

You don't need to be a member to access tremendous content. They explain the stall and wrapping at length and the science behind them.

'The Stall' is like a person sweating - it acts as a coolant. Since the meat cooks from the outside-in and the meat literally sweats for hours on-end, it just stalls for what seems like forever.

#54 | Posted by JeffJ at 2016-11-23 11:21 PM | Reply

In my GreenEgg that is high.... I like 250, seems to work well. Wrap on good "bark" as you say.

#53 | POSTED BY ANDREAMACKRIS

Are you using the diffuser-plate?

Also, it's not a technique that lends itself to kamados. They are SO dang efficient that the fire isn't really hot enough to generate "grill smoke". Ceramic retains heat incredibly well.

#55 | Posted by JeffJ at 2016-11-23 11:23 PM | Reply

Good call. Filling up on too much beer won't leave room for the whiskey.

#40 | Posted by LIVE_OR_DIE

If Trump heard you say this he'd grab you.

#56 | Posted by jpw at 2016-11-24 01:09 AM | Reply

Go to Amazinribs.com

They have a lengthy review of it.

#50 | Posted by JeffJ

Go there for everything.

If that isn't bookmarked on your browser to be the first stop for BBQ info of any sort you're aiming for failure.

#57 | Posted by jpw at 2016-11-24 01:12 AM | Reply

For my turkey (just me so a bone in breast on the menu) I use a rub of olive oil, fresh minced sage, thyme and rosemary along with some salt, pepper and garlic. Starting at a few small ----- in the skin, I work my hands under the skin to separate the skin from the breast. Half the rub (more like a paste) gets poured under the skin and worked around to coat evenly. The rest goes on the outside of the skin (evenly spread of course...) then it goes in the oven. If the skin browns too fast I just tent it with foil to hold moisture until the meat hits temp.

A good question for the DR foodies-what do you do with the leftover turkey? I find reheated turkey to be funny tasting and easily over dried; also, I get tired of cold turkey sandwiches after about two days.

In the past I've been pleased with making turkey chili (red and white) but I'm interested in what y'all do as a change this year.

#58 | Posted by jpw at 2016-11-24 01:26 AM | Reply

#1: My Dad (a very good cook) deboned a 18# turkey and stuffed it with largish chunks of fatty Boston Butt pork roast (abt 8 lbs), then filled in the blanks with bulk breakfast sausage (abt 2 lbs). I helped him with it including trussing it up. We'll start roasting it about 9:00 AM. It looks good so far. Can't wait to start roasting it.

All three of my sisters, their husbands, and one niece are here with us at Dad's in Savannah, GA. Looks to be a great day. Thanksgiving and Independence Day are my favorite holidays of the year.

#59 | Posted by goatman at 2016-11-24 01:32 AM | Reply

A good question for the DR foodies-what do you do with the leftover turkey? I find reheated turkey to be funny tasting and easily over dried; also, I get tired of cold turkey sandwiches after about two days.
In the past I've been pleased with making turkey chili (red and white) but I'm interested in what y'all do as a change this year.
#58 | POSTED BY JPW AT 2016-11-24 01:26 AM
---

- Turkey chimichangas stuffed with mushrooms, peppers, and cheese, browned in pan then oven.

- Turkey enchiladas.

- Turkey pot pie.

- Pulled turkey sandwiches w BBQ sauce, pickles, and coleslaw.

#60 | Posted by LIVE_OR_DIE at 2016-11-24 02:31 AM | Reply

Turkey pot pie was probably my favorite, we ended up making a bunch of filling with potatoes, carrots, and peas etc., but only made 1 actual pie, froze and later ate the rest as is with no crust. Great cold weather food.

#61 | Posted by LIVE_OR_DIE at 2016-11-24 02:42 AM | Reply

#58
Turkey ala king, over rice; open face sandwich, w/ left over potato and gravy

#62 | Posted by Whizzo at 2016-11-24 07:31 AM | Reply

Thanks for all the info Jeff.

Sorry I had to check out early last night. Ms Lft said to come "come hither". This my que to drop the DR.

#63 | Posted by lfthndthrds at 2016-11-24 07:45 AM | Reply

My mom would take leftover smoked turkey and make smoked turkey and oyster gumbo.

For the leftover baked turkey she would make turkey salad.

#64 | Posted by lfthndthrds at 2016-11-24 07:50 AM | Reply

I know all about "come hither".

As for leftovers....turkey noodle soup. The carcass plus the uncooked gizzards and neck can be used to make the stock.

I always boil the noodles separately and I add chicken bouillon to the water for the noodles to amp up their flavor.

#65 | Posted by JeffJ at 2016-11-24 08:11 AM | Reply

Roast small turkey, carve, roast carcass, make stock.
Brine big turkey in stock, loosen skin, pipe in herb truffle butter, slow roast, carve, serve.

#66 | Posted by sitzkrieg at 2016-11-24 08:14 AM | Reply

I have never been a turkey fan. I like the side dishes more. I wish one year my family would just make something else as the main course and serve the sides.

#67 | Posted by byrdman at 2016-11-24 08:23 AM | Reply

My Thanksgiving is ruined by family squabbles so I'll have to be eating two turkey dinners. I hate it when siblings can't get along. Maybe I should just boycott Thanksgiving.

#68 | Posted by danni at 2016-11-24 08:59 AM | Reply

My Thanksgiving is ruined by family squabbles so I'll have to be eating two turkey dinners. I hate it when siblings can't get along. Maybe I should just boycott Thanksgiving.

Posted by danni at 2016-11-24 08:59 AM | Reply

This is why I don't do family Thanksgiving dinners. I'm a double sinner Liberal and LGBT.

#69 | Posted by LauraMohr at 2016-11-24 09:03 AM | Reply

My Thanksgiving is ruined by family squabbles so I'll have to be eating two turkey dinners. I hate it when siblings can't get along. Maybe I should just boycott Thanksgiving.

#68 | POSTED BY DANNI AT 2016-11-24 08:59 AM | FLAG:

Thankfully we only have one squabbler to deal with and she's out of the states this year 😜

#70 | Posted by lfthndthrds at 2016-11-24 09:22 AM | Reply

This is why I don't do family Thanksgiving dinners. I'm a double sinner Liberal and LGBT.

#69 | POSTED BY LAURAMOHR AT 2016-11-24 09:03 AM | FLAG:

We don't have to deal with that. My oldest sister is gay, been with her partner around 12 or 13 years now. They host occasionally and just happens its at their house this year. But our family never really had any problems with it anyway. I guess if they did they kept it to themselves.

#71 | Posted by lfthndthrds at 2016-11-24 09:26 AM | Reply

#68 | DANNI
My sympathies, and I totally relate to what you're going through. When first married my mother and MIL didn't get along. No good reason, they just didn't get along. So we had two dinners each Thanksgiving. Even that was filled with drama. Who got the noon slot and who got the leftover 5 O'clock. Easter and Xmas were equally f'd up.
So even if they can't get along, you give thanks. 'It's all good'.

#69 | LAURAMOHR
Happy Thanksgiving Laura, same message, 'It's all good'.

#72 | Posted by Whizzo at 2016-11-24 09:59 AM | Reply

I know all about "come hither".
#65 | JEFFJ

I don't think he was talking about filing her bunions. ;D

#73 | Posted by Whizzo at 2016-11-24 10:02 AM | Reply | Funny: 1

My preference is frozen turkey dropped in deep fryer.
#23 | POSTED BY SYCOPHANT

Well, that didn't work out well. I didn't even have any to offer the fire dept when they were done with the blaze.

#74 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2016-11-24 10:06 AM | Reply

Anyone else have some boardgames or any other type of mildly competitive activity lined up after the Thanksgiving feast?

#75 | Posted by GOnoles92 at 2016-11-24 10:36 AM | Reply

#75

Yes, we have 'Sequence' and a variation of Sorry that's played with cards instead of dice. Both can play 3-6 players. You have to have a special board for sequence, poker chips and cards. We range in age from 8-92 so football and frisbee are pretty much out.

#76 | Posted by Whizzo at 2016-11-24 10:49 AM | Reply

Busy day

Stuffed 23 pound bird. Bag it, it beats basting. Roasted pine nuts and wild rice in the dressing.

Gravy & tart cranberry sauce.

Contrasting yams, Chipolte and orange skin stuffed with cinnamon and cloves.

Garlic mashed potatoes.

A gallon or so of Kendall-Jackson private reserve chardonney.

celebration of our animal nature.

be eating the same think off and on all week.

#77 | Posted by nutcase at 2016-11-24 08:41 PM | Reply

A gallon or so of Kendall-Jackson private reserve chardonney.

I never knew how good white wine went with turkey until today.

I used a dry sauvignon blanc for some cooking today and drank the rest with dinner. Paired fantastically with the bird!

#78 | Posted by jpw at 2016-11-24 09:17 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Fav pairing with bird: King Estate Pinot Gris. Unless money is no object, then Kongsgaard Chardonnay.

Happy Turkey Day!

#79 | Posted by Danforth at 2016-11-24 09:43 PM | Reply

Cooked a 21 pound bird in my 26.75" Weber kettle.

As it turns out, I also made the "stuffing". I didn't stuff the bird, but I placed turkey wings on top of the stuffing when I baked it to similar effect - the juices permeated the stuffing.

Even though this was at my mom's, I also had to do the mashed potatoes. They were boiled with their skins on until they hit 205 and then I used a potato ricer. Keeping the skins on prevented the starch from bleeding into the water and add-in the texture of the ricer and we had some seriously fluffy potatoes.

I used the drippings from my grilled bird to make the gravy - which had a nice smoky overtone to it.

My wife made cranberry jelly from scratch a couple of days prior.

We had a great Thanksgiving in terms of food and time with family. It was all a bit sweeter with the Lions winning in dramatic fashion. I am not a big Lions fan but I absolutely love their traditional game that goes all of the way back to the '30's.

We had some nice Malbec with dinner and after. I am now sipping a 17 year Glen Scotia (distillery has been closed for several years) as a nightcap.

#80 | Posted by JeffJ at 2016-11-25 01:55 AM | Reply

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