Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Suppose two jumbo jets crashed every day, killing a total of about 365,000 people in a year. Remarkably enough that's about the level of carnage caused every year in our country by avoidable medical mistakes.

We would never tolerate such an incredible loss of life were it caused by recurring plane crashes (or most anything else). The Federal Aviation Authority would be given immediate and unlimited funding to figure out exactly why the planes were crashing and to do whatever it takes to make them safe again.

In fact, complete reporting of mistakes, and constantly correcting them, has made flying in a commercial plane about the safest thing a person can ever do.

In contrast, and inexplicably, we tolerate an equivalent loss of life caused by medical mistakes, despite the fact that they have become the third leading cause of death in the US. There is no public fear and rage, no sustained and coordinated effort to identify the major sources of error and eliminate them.

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Neglect of medical safety has made the simple act of being admitted to a hospital about the most dangerous thing you can possibly do. And the hospitals and government are doing little to make medical care safer.

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The article lists 6 "obvious, practical, common sense, effective ways to prevent medical mistakes, reduce deaths, and lengthen lives" ...

1. Get Serious About Infections
2. Clinical Pharmacy
3. Structured Hand-Offs
4. Fight Diagnostic Error
5. Make Electronic Medical Records (EMR) Interoperable
6. Report All Medical Errors

The article does a good job explaining each area.

#1 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2016-10-18 08:44 PM | Reply

7. don't let stoned/drunk surgeons into the OR.

#2 | Posted by northguy3 at 2016-10-18 10:53 PM | Reply

the best thing one can do to protect themselves is get a check up twice a year and don't take the meds unless its totally unavoidable.

Drink ceramic filtered or distilled water
quit taking the flu shot
your medical doctor is there for medical health, if you've experienced trauma mentally they're not the one to help you. quit taking the feel good drugs from a MD
Exercise and eat as little processed food as possible
Red meat as little as possible
Eat raw organic veggies as much as possible
do some research on minerals, vitamins and Omega 3,6,9s the stuff from the grocery store isn't doing you any good.
good red wine can do you wonders, a cab or pinot. not Boones farm or thunderbird.
And always read the background on any drug you're about to start taking, in many cases it has side effects that will require another med treat.

#3 | Posted by lfthndthrds at 2016-10-19 03:16 AM | Reply

quit taking the flu shot

Everyone needs an annual flu shot.

10 Biggest Myths About The Flu
www.health.com

#4 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2016-10-19 06:00 AM | Reply

#4

I quit taking the flu shot 6 years ago and haven't had the flu since. before that it was hit or miss - sometimes i got it sometimes I didn't. But the weird thing about it was that the times i did get the flu the doctor knew I had the shot and never tested me to see what I had. just simply told me "the flu is going around"
Seems to me they would be interested in product quality if they're selling me something that doesn't work.

on the subject of vaccinations, I want to be the one to decide if I take it or not.

#5 | Posted by lfthndthrds at 2016-10-19 06:10 AM | Reply

the weird thing about it was that the times i did get the flu the doctor knew I had the shot and never tested me to see what I had. just simply told me "the flu is going around"

I'm not excusing the doctor, and I'm not disbelieving what you're saying.

Modern medicine, regardless of the specialty, is The MOST knowledge intense and most technologically advanced endeavor, ever -- and for doctors to be up-to-date on everything they'd have to read something like 5000 medical journal articles a day, which is impossible. However, I think, understanding these things helps to keep expectations at a reasonable level.

One of the things mentioned in the article was to mandate in making electronic medical records (EMR) interoperable...

5. Make Electronic Medical Records (EMR) Interoperable: The Affordable Care Act included $36.5 billion for an EMR super highway to make all of a patient's history, lab results and medications available for current care decisions.

Unfortunately, industry lobbyists prevailed on the Administration to disgorge the funds on closed source technologies rather than on interoperable systems- this has resulted in a balkanized patchwork of electronic providers. Different hospitals and doctors' offices' computers usually cannot communicate with each other, impeding diagnosis and jeopardizing treatment.

A California trauma team may not know that its unconscious accident victim from Nevada has a drug allergy or respiratory condition requiring special antibiotic or anaesthesia controls.

A 2014 study found that only 14% of clinicians shared data with doctors beyond their care organization.

In 2015 Congress reacted with the Medicare Access and Children's Health Insurance Reauthorization Act directing interoperability within four years, but the legislation is longer on study than enforcement. Providers and patient advocates who abhor these absurdly dangerous barriers should advocate for and work towards a system whose parts can talk to one another.


Of the two presidential candidates, only one knows of these sort of issues, and only presidential candidate is advocating to improve the ACA.

#6 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2016-10-19 06:50 AM | Reply

LFTHNDTHRDS

I've had similar experiences with my Primary Care. As much as I like him personally, I've noticed that he isn't much interested in anything but a lab report and prescriptions. I don't know if this is pandemic in the profession but I'm getting a little worried that his indifference to my overall well being could result in an undetected problem, especially so considering my family history.

#7 | Posted by Twinpac at 2016-10-19 06:52 AM | Reply

Twin,

I try to stay out of the Dr office as much as possible. I used to get my blood work done for free when we had a laboratory at the refinery but all that went away in '08

So now I have to make an appointment and go in.

at one point my doctor had me on 7 medications, two of which were for side effects of the other pills. At one point I was seeing a kidney specialist because I lost over 75% of my kidney function and what made me angry about it was that I learned from a simple google search that my Blood pressure medication's worst side effect was Kidney failure. Neither the PCP or the specialist thought to tell me to get off that ----.

The only interest the Doctors seem to have these days is selling drugs and as many as they possibly can and they run you through there like cattle.

#8 | Posted by lfthndthrds at 2016-10-19 07:12 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

at one point my doctor had me on 7 medications, two of which were for side effects of the other pills. At one point I was seeing a kidney specialist because I lost over 75% of my kidney function and what made me angry about it was that I learned from a simple google search that my Blood pressure medication's worst side effect was Kidney failure. Neither the PCP or the specialist thought to tell me to get off that ----.

#8 | POSTED BY LFTHNDTHRDS

Your situation would have been prevented by the points #2 and #5. I touched on #5 interoperable EMRS.

The other, point #2 is explained below...

2. Clinical Pharmacy: A major breakthrough in twentieth century care allowed nurses to make rounds with doctors. Twenty-first century hospitals should also include pharmacists in rounds.

The majority of medication mistakes involve physicians' initial orders.

Doctors are not universal geniuses and shouldn't have to be. They know a lot about a lot of things, but compared to pharmacists, have a relatively thin knowledge of the ever multiplying world of drugs- how they interact with each other, diet, age, disease and body type.

A comprehensive study of over 400,000 medication errors at 1116 hospitals showed that putting pharmacists in patient areas decreased errors by 45%. Errors leading to death, serious harm, or increased length of stay went down by 94%.

#9 | Posted by PinchALoaf at 2016-10-19 09:26 AM | Reply

PINCH

I hate to sound like a whiner but I lost faith in my pharmacist when he kept refilling prescriptions without my OK. It was just a small startup pharmacy and I knew they were operating on a dime but it soon became apparent that they were padding the bill to my insurance company.

Really, I started asking myself "When did I lose control of my life?" I still have all my marbles and I really resented anybody doing anything unless I ask them to. My new pharmacy waits for me to request a refill which is what I prefer.

#10 | Posted by Twinpac at 2016-10-19 10:51 AM | Reply

Headline should say 'Medical Violence..............'

#11 | Posted by Sniper at 2016-10-19 02:02 PM | Reply

The only interest the Doctors seem to have these days is selling drugs and as many as they possibly can and they run you through there like cattle.

There's a very good reason for that. It's so much easier and cheaper to get you to take a pill than cut you open.

That being said, our system creates circumstances where drug interactions are a real concern, since you could be getting different Rxs from separate doctors who have no idea what the other is Rxing. Unless you get them filled at the same pharmacist, and they bother to check, you could be in real trouble. Seems obvious, but sometimes physicians give samples, or sometimes it's just easier to use the pharmacy at the clinic since you're already there. Anyway, the point is, obviously this problem goes away if we move from a bazillion private systems to one. This is an inefficiency created by not having a single payer system; presumably the payer would be reviewing all your Rxs before dispensing ones that conflict.

#12 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-10-19 02:38 PM | Reply

How am I, as a Canadian, going to come there for treatment like Trump reported if this is the case!!??..oh right..I won't !

#13 | Posted by ghoti at 2016-10-19 06:21 PM | Reply

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