Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Edward Snowden exaggerated his resume, stole test answers and failed training on U.S. surveillance law before he copied an estimated 1.5 million classified documents from the National Security Agency, according to a summary of a House Intelligence Committee report released Thursday. The committee unanimously adopted the investigative report a day before Oliver Stone's Snowden premieres in movie theaters. Committee members sent a bipartisan letter to Obama urging him not to pardon Snowden. The House report provides new details about Snowden's background, and calls into question his self-declared motivations and his work at the NSA before he fled to China and then Russia, where he now lives. It describes him as a "serial exaggerator and fabricator."

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"Contrary to Snowden's self-portrayal as a principled whistle-blower," the committee said in a statement, he was "a disgruntled employee who had frequent conflicts with his managers and was reprimanded" shortly before he began downloading the trove of NSA documents.

Release of the digital documents to media groups in 2013 "did severe damage to U.S. national security, compromising the intelligence community's anti-terror efforts and endangering the security of the American people as well as active-duty U.S. troops," the committee said.

Committee members said their two-year investigation found most of the files Snowden took had no civil liberties concerns, but instead revealed spying programs against adversaries and allied governments.

Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank), ranking member of the committee, said the investigation found that Snowden's claims that he acted to defend Americans' privacy were "self serving and false" and that he did "profound" damage to national security.

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The 36-page investigative report remains classified, but a three-page summary released by the committee shows that Snowden failed an internal training for NSA employees on Section 702 of surveillance law, which targets foreign Internet traffic.

Part of that training, lawmakers concluded, included privacy provisions in place to protect the rights of U.S. citizens from data collected inadvertently while the NSA vacuumed up online data.

After reviewing Snowden's employment records, the panel found he had engaged in what the summary called a "pattern of intentional lying."

Snowden "obtained new positions at NSA by exaggerating his resume and stealing the answers to an employment test," the summary states.

"He claimed to have left [Army] basic training because of broken legs when in fact he washed out because of shin splints," it says. "He claimed to have obtained a high school degree equivalent when in fact he never did. He claimed to have worked for the CIA as a ‘senior advisor,' which was a gross exaggeration of his entry-level duties as a computer technician. He also doctored his performance evaluations and obtained new positions at NSA by exaggerating his resume and stealing the answers to an employment test."

All of this begs the question, why did the NSA hire him in the first place?

#1 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2016-09-19 06:36 PM | Reply

The Bipartisan panel was unanimously critical of the damage he caused to the US:

Intelligence officials have said that material he leaked helped Russia and China protect themselves from U.S. surveillance, and taught terrorist groups such as Islamic State to better hide their tracks.

The House report is based on hundreds of secret documents and dozens of briefings with intelligence officials.

The committee concluded that Snowden is not a whistle-blower because he did not try to raise his civil liberties concerns through official channels or with Congress, and most of the data he stole from NSA computers was not related to privacy concerns.

The report does not outline specific damage to national security but lawmakers said the disclosures "exacerbated and accelerated existing trends" in the use of encrypted messages by adversaries and terrorist groups.

Lawmakers also expressed concern that intelligence officials have not done enough to prevent future thefts. The Department of Defense has reviewed all 1.5 million documents Snowden removed, but the intelligence community has not conducted such a comprehensive review.

The government has spent hundreds of millions of dollars "and will eventually spend billions" to mitigate the damage caused by the leaks, the committee concluded.

So he steals millions of pages of documents that help the Chinese and Russians then flees first to China then to Russia and according to the Left he is a hero?

Riiiiight.

#2 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2016-09-19 06:39 PM | Reply

He also farted in a full elevator once, which should also negate the intrusive unconstitutional spying he exposed.

He's also white (racist) and male (misogynist), and currently Putin's (commie) number-two-bruh behind Trump.

#3 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2016-09-19 06:46 PM | Reply

He also farted in a full elevator once, which should also negate the intrusive unconstitutional spying he exposed.

On that topic, Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank), ranking member of the committee, said "[w]hile those disclosures did spark a useful public debate, the collateral damage has been extraordinary," Schiff said.

#4 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2016-09-19 06:51 PM | Reply

Spying on a partner or spouse, hacking into their email, cell phone, or text messages is considered abuse and an invasion of privacy.

But when our nation does it? The abusers line up to defend it.

#5 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2016-09-19 07:11 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

But when our nation does it? The abusers line up to defend it.

#5 | POSTED BY SHEEPLESCHISM AT 2016-09-19 07:11 PM

Wrong. "a three-page summary released by the committee shows that Snowden failed an internal training for NSA employees on Section 702 of surveillance law, which targets foreign Internet traffic. Part of that training, lawmakers concluded, included privacy provisions in place to protect the rights of U.S. citizens from data collected inadvertently while the NSA vacuumed up online data."

So the privacy protections were in place but since Snowden failed the internal training about those protections he "blew the whistle", so to speak, causing billions of dollars of damage to the US taxpayers.

#6 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2016-09-19 08:26 PM | Reply

"...while the NSA vacuumed up online data."

LOL. yeah. everything the NSA has been doing was above board, American, and U.S.A. red, white, and blue.

I can smell the apple pie and hear the crack of a baseball bat in your postings.

I hope you're never one of the unfortunates who gets SWAT'ed over a google search.

#7 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2016-09-19 08:48 PM | Reply

LOL. yeah. everything the NSA has been doing was above board, American, and U.S.A. red, white, and blue.

I didn't say that and tend to agree with Rep. Schiff that this prompted a useful public debate on privacy, but for anyone to argue that he released 1.5 Million classified documents to only "expose" domestic spying (when he failed the class on domestic privacy) is pretty absurd...if that was his intent, then why didn't he only release those documents that related to that particular issue?

None of the Snowden apologists, Oliver Stone included, have an answer for that question.

#8 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2016-09-19 09:00 PM | Reply

Serial exaggerator and fabricator - GEE, I thought they were talking about obama talking about his 'accomplishments' !!!

#9 | Posted by MSgt at 2016-09-19 11:37 PM | Reply

And with all of that, was still employed.

#10 | Posted by Lohocla at 2016-09-20 08:20 AM | Reply

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All of this begs the question, why did the NSA hire him in the first place?

#1 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2016-09-19 06:36 PM | Reply | Flag:

When liars tell you something that doesn't make logical sense, it is usually because the liars are lying to you.

#11 | Posted by Sully at 2016-09-20 09:54 AM | Reply

Serial exaggerator and fabricator - GEE, I thought they were talking about obama talking about his 'accomplishments' !!!

#9 | Posted by MSgt

What's to lie about? One of the most accomplished Preznit's ever.

If he didn't accomplish anything why is the GOtP desperately trying to repeal his "fabrications" 60+ times?

Get a grip MSgt! You poor devils be chasing rainbows and unicorns!

And that's an awful big reach anyway considering Billionaire Trump's Big 5 Year Lie and Birther Fabrication and Confession is sitting right there in front of you.

#12 | Posted by donnerboy at 2016-09-20 02:54 PM | Reply

Our government spent three years trying to dig up dirt on Snowden resulting in a lame 36 page document far richer in lies than anything Snowden has ever claimed. It release was timed to counter Oliver Stone's movie. We live in a sea of lies.

Snowden's Army paperwork says he met the demanding standards of an 18X Special Forces recruit and mustered into the Army on June 3, 2004. The diagnosis that led to his discharge, on crutches, was bilateral tibial stress fractures.

Snowden sat for the high school equivalency test on May 4, 2004. He needed a score of 2250 to pass. He scored 3550. His Diploma No. 269403 was dated June 2, 2004, the same month he would have graduated had he returned to Arundel High School after losing his sophomore year to mononucleosis.

Here are the three main roles Snowden played at the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). (1) His entry level position, as a contractor, was system administrator (one among several) of the agency's Washington metropolitan area network. (2) After that he was selected for and spent six months in training as a telecommunications information security officer, responsible for all classified technology in U.S. embassies overseas. The CIA deployed him to Geneva under diplomatic cover, complete with an alias identity and a badge describing him as a State Department attache. (3) In his third CIA job, the title on his Dell business card was "solutions consultant / cyber referent" for the intelligence community writ large -- the company's principal point of contact for cyber contracts and proposals. In that role, Snowden met regularly with the chiefs and deputy chiefs of the CIA's technical branches to talk through their cutting edge computer needs.

Snowden discovered and reported a security hole in the CIA's human resources intranet page. With his supervisor's permission, he made a benign demonstration of how a hostile actor could take control. He did not change the content of his performance evaluation. He changed the way it displayed on screen.

Snowden was a Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer with years of experience under his belt by then. I can't explain why anyone thinks he would have to steal the answers.

But there is one truth in the Government document. When Snowden decided to leave the NSA with a cache of documents for public release, he gave a false cover story for his absence.

#13 | Posted by nutcase at 2016-09-20 02:59 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

In analyzing Snowden and his NSA disclosures, the biggest and most important issue is whether the nation is better off as a result. IMO this is a no-brainer. The NSA and law enforcement community were SO out of line. They basically destroyed all Americans traditional expectation of privacy. The NSA perpetrated the worst civil rights violations in fifty years. And it was all just flying under the radar until Snowden blew the whistle. You don't need to like Snowden on a personal level to understand how important his contribution to American democracy and freedom turned out to be.

#14 | Posted by moder8 at 2016-09-20 03:03 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 3

#14, Well said. To which I would add that all their violations accomplished nothing. The CIA, Pentagon, NSA and Homeland Security aren't any good at their jobs, unless you count chaos as success, which sadly, may be their ultimate purpose.

#15 | Posted by nutcase at 2016-09-20 03:11 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

www.drudge.com

#16 | Posted by Corky at 2016-09-20 03:16 PM | Reply

The entire point of this hit piece is character assassination by a butthurt spook agency that got busted spying on Americans.

Shame on the defenders and apologists for this criminal activity.

#17 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2016-09-20 03:17 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

#16 | POSTED BY CORKY

We're already well aware of your love for the global elite.

#18 | Posted by SheepleSchism at 2016-09-20 03:18 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

#16, The notion of freedom of speech collides with a club of self designated insiders with a sacred vow to maintain secrecy, however self serving that practice might be, but always disguised in the name of "national security". It is ridiculous to prosecute Snowden without also prosecuting the newspapers that published his information. There is no comparison between Walker and Snowden which the report also attempts to allege. Walker did it for money and our spies died. Snowden was deeply offended by what was going on, recognized the impossibility of working through authoritarian channels and put his own life at risk without asking for anything in return. A true patriot if their ever was one.

#19 | Posted by nutcase at 2016-09-20 03:26 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

He fled to China and Russia. He gave them state secrets well beyond our internal spying program. He lost me after that.

#20 | Posted by Sycophant at 2016-09-20 03:35 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

Again, you don't have to be a personal fan of Snowden to understand and appreciate the scope of the NSA/government abuses revealed by him.

#21 | Posted by moder8 at 2016-09-20 03:38 PM | Reply

"Contrary to Snowden's self-portrayal as a principled whistle-blower," the committee said in a statement, he was "a disgruntled employee who had frequent conflicts with his managers and was reprimanded" shortly before he began downloading the trove of NSA documents.

I saw Stone's movie over the weekend and enjoyed it, even though it was a propaganda-fueled puff piece to prop up Snowden and his illegal actions. With that said, the above was covered in the movie. Only, the conflict he had with managers and him being reprimanded were provided within a context that makes Snowden very sympathetic. We are talking about the CIA and NSA here, not exactly the most noble or ethical organizations. So for this committee to make out either organization as some saintly, holier than though entities that should ALWAYS be obeyed, beyond question. I do not subscribe to this sentiment, nor should anyone else, but the fact of the matter is Snowden broke the law. I still believe what he did was indeed a double edge sword in putting many American interests at risk (soldiers too?), but the positive edge underlying Snowden's actions within the setting of Whistleblower status outweighs any potential risks, IMO. Therefore, I believe Snowden deserves to be charged, tried (VERY PUBLICLY), and should be convicted. However, his sentence should also be commuted by the President. He won't be able to continue in his line of work with such a conviction (most likely), but he's famous enough now that he can provide for himself and live a comfortable life. Was it treason? No, I don't believe so. Everything he gave to the Russians and the Chinese he also gave to the press. Anything that's known by the press is known by our "enemies" anyways.

#22 | Posted by rstybeach11 at 2016-09-20 03:47 PM | Reply

#20, What State secrets are you talking about? Your point means nothing without some specificity.

#23 | Posted by nutcase at 2016-09-20 03:53 PM | Reply

So the privacy protections were in place but since Snowden failed the internal training about those protections he "blew the whistle", so to speak...
#6 | POSTED BY RIGHTOCENTER

That's not entirely accurate. Privacy protections may have been in place, but they were ineffective. That's one of the major influences behind Snowden's crime. The issue is bigger than this single occurrence: it's really a case of the Emperor's New Clothes; the notion that privacy protections are in place but have minimal effect in protecting privacy. This notion goes beyond just the NSA spying and affects other portions of government as well. Big Brother is surprisingly (call me naive) more appropriate of a warning than anyone could have legitimately considered.

#24 | Posted by rstybeach11 at 2016-09-20 03:54 PM | Reply

#23 |

Read the article or even just the summary in link at 16.

#25 | Posted by Corky at 2016-09-20 03:55 PM | Reply

In analyzing Snowden and his NSA disclosures, the biggest and most important issue is whether the nation is better off as a result. IMO this is a no-brainer. The NSA and law enforcement community were SO out of line. They basically destroyed all Americans traditional expectation of privacy. The NSA perpetrated the worst civil rights violations in fifty years. And it was all just flying under the radar until Snowden blew the whistle. You don't need to like Snowden on a personal level to understand how important his contribution to American democracy and freedom turned out to be.

#14 | Posted by moder8 at 2016-09-20 03:03 PM | Reply |

I agree with once caveat: He gave us information that SHOULD have resulted in our being better off. But so many Americans are either apathetic or easily scared into giving up their rights that we failed to react to his revelations accordingly. So we are no better off. He can not force us to help ourselves.

As for his fleeing the country and working with foreign governments - any betrayal on his part only occurred after we failed him miserably. If this country really lived up the principles we go on and on about, he would have been rewarded for what he did. He would not have had to flee. He would be a hero. But we are not as we pretend to be. Once it became apparent that the reaction to what he did would be a mix of apathy and petty, vindictive cowardice, he was justified in doing whatever he had to do to avoid ending up in the hands of goverment torturers. His most major mistake was believing our collective BS.

#26 | Posted by Sully at 2016-09-20 03:58 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 2

I believe Snowden deserves to be charged, tried (VERY PUBLICLY), and should be convicted. However, his sentence should also be commuted by the President.

What exactly would be the reason for this elaborate charade?

#27 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-20 04:07 PM | Reply

Any of the Snowden haters ever called for Snowden's boss and NSA head Clapper to be tried for telling Congress under oath that Americans weren't being spied on?

When the head of NSA is lying to Congress there is no internal NSA government whistle to blow. The entire organization was dutifully carrying out their corrupt mission and truly believes they are spying on us for our own good.

#28 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-20 04:17 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

#25, I did. Is there something in there that was not widely known before and after Snowden's leaks? If so, I missed it. All efforts to control the Taliban and other tribes in Afghanistan, by the Russians and Americans have failed. Is there any reason to think Snowden somehow turned the tide against us in Afghanistan? We know everything in the 36 page report is a lie, except what Snowden did when he skipped. Is there any reason to believe anything the NSA or CIA says, ever?

#29 | Posted by nutcase at 2016-09-20 04:34 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Is there any reason to believe anything the NSA or CIA says, ever?
#29 | Posted by nutcase

Under the current climate I'd say no.
When the head of NSA feels safe lying to Congress under oath, NSA simply can't be trusted.
That was kind of Snowden's whole point.
Then he showed the world just what we've allowed themselves to entrust themselves with.

#30 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-20 04:43 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

What exactly would be the reason for this elaborate charade?
#27 | POSTED BY SNOOFY

It's called due process and Snowden has a right to it.

#31 | Posted by rstybeach11 at 2016-09-20 04:44 PM | Reply

When the head of NSA is lying to Congress there is no internal NSA government whistle to blow. The entire organization was dutifully carrying out their corrupt mission and truly believes they are spying on us for our own good.
#28 | POSTED BY SNOOFY

NW

#32 | Posted by rstybeach11 at 2016-09-20 04:45 PM | Reply

"Why Snowden Won't (and Shouldn't) Get Clemency
He went too far to be considered just a whistleblower.
By Fred Kaplan

A must read from a dedicated lefty who happens to know national sec issues very well.

"I regard Daniel Ellsberg as an American patriot....

And yet I firmly disagree with the New York Times' Jan. 1 editorial ("Edward Snowden, Whistle-Blower"), calling on President Obama to grant Snowden "some form of clemency" for the "great service" he has done for his country.

It is true that Snowden's revelations about the National Security Agency's surveillance of American citizens -- far vaster than any outsider had suspected, in some cases vaster than the agency's overseers on the secret FISA court had permitted -- have triggered a valuable debate, leading possibly to much-needed reforms.

If that were all that Snowden had done, if his stolen trove of beyond-top-secret documents had dealt only with the NSA's domestic surveillance, then some form of leniency might be worth discussing.

But Snowden did much more than that.

The documents that he gave the Washington Post's Barton Gellman and the Guardian's Glenn Greenwald have, so far, furnished stories about the NSA's interception of email traffic, mobile phone calls, and radio transmissions of Taliban fighters in Pakistan's northwest territories; about an operation to gauge the loyalties of CIA recruits in Pakistan; about NSA email intercepts to assist intelligence assessments of what's going on inside Iran; about NSA surveillance of cellphone calls "worldwide," an effort that (in the Post's words) "allows it to look for unknown associates of known intelligence targets by tracking people whose movements intersect."

In his first interview with the South China Morning Post, Snowden revealed that the NSA routinely hacks into hundreds of computers in China and Hong Kong.

These operations have nothing to do with domestic surveillance or even spying on allies. They are not illegal, improper, or (in the context of 21st-century international politics) immoral. Exposing such operations has nothing to do with "whistle-blowing."

Many have likened Snowden's actions to Daniel Ellsberg's leaking of the Pentagon Papers. (Ellsberg himself has made the comparison.) But the Pentagon Papers were historical documents on how the United States got involved in the Vietnam War.

Ellsberg leaked them (after first taking them to several senators, who wanted nothing to do with them) in the hopes that their revelations would inspire pressure to end the war. It's worth noting that he did not leak several volumes of the Papers dealing with ongoing peace talks. Nor did he leak anything about tactical operations.

Nor did he go to North Vietnam and praise its leaders (as Snowden did in Russia)."

much more at link

www.slate.com

Snowden is like the bank robber who helped the little old lady across the street as he left the bank. It was a nice gesture, but he didn't have to rob a bank to do it.

He didn't have to give up a ton of classified nat sec docs that were totally unrelated to domestic spying to be a whistleblower.

#33 | Posted by Corky at 2016-09-20 04:53 PM | Reply

(1) His entry level position, as a contractor, was system administrator (one among several) of the agency's Washington metropolitan area network.

Did the person who gave an entry level employee the keys to the castle ever get so much as a reprimand?

No, of course not. Just like in Manning's case. The person who let him bring rewritable media into the secure computer room --and the person who allowed those computers to be deployed with CD burners which could only be used to move information to or from them -- faced zero reprimand.

Our professional intelligence agencies screwed up so bad, they can't even come up with a patsy, like the torture freaks did with Lynndie England.

#34 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-20 04:56 PM | Reply

Snowden is like the bank robber who helped the little old lady across the street as he left the bank.

Don't people rob banks for the money?
So why'd Snowden share all the information with the world for free?

#35 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-20 04:57 PM | Reply

It is true that Snowden's revelations about the National Security Agency's surveillance of American citizens -- far vaster than any outsider had suspected, It is true that Snowden's revelations about the National Security Agency's surveillance of American citizens -- far vaster than any outsider had suspected, in some cases vaster than the agency's overseers on the secret FISA court had permitted -- have triggered a valuable debat -- have triggered a valuable debate

A "valuable" debate.
But not a policy debate.
I rate this clam as "mostly smokescreen."

But let's look at the facts. Calling out the NSA for activities that were "in some cases vaster than the agency's overseers on the secret FISA court had permitted" is exactly what makes Snowden a whistleblower.

#37 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-20 05:01 PM | Reply

Any of the Snowden haters ever called for Snowden's boss and NSA head Clapper to be tried for telling Congress under oath that Americans weren't being spied on?

When the head of NSA is lying to Congress there is no internal NSA government whistle to blow. The entire organization was dutifully carrying out their corrupt mission and truly believes they are spying on us for our own good.

#28 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-20 04:17 PM

Excellent question and point.

Expect crickets as a response from the haters.

#38 | Posted by LIVE_OR_DIE at 2016-09-20 05:03 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

"Edward Snowden exaggerated his resume"

Is there anything more red-blooded American that exaggerating on your resume?

#39 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-20 05:10 PM | Reply

Who cares what he did before he turned American Hero?

Wag the dog, boys; wag the dog!

#40 | Posted by larry609 at 2016-09-20 05:40 PM | Reply

#36

It's funny how often a supposed lawyer is without argument and left only with caricature of the messenger. Wonder how that werks in court?

As to you being some kind of superior liberal? hahahaha!!

If you or anyone else comes up with a legit argument to Kaplan's point, do let us know.

#35

Reportedly he's making quite a bit in speaking fees and movie rights. And he has free room and board.

As to his motivation, the people who knew him best, like the supervisor and the internal clients he lied to and stole from, some of whom lost their jobs and had their careers ruined, seem to think he was out to prove he could gain such access because he was considered a low level support tech.

#41 | Posted by Corky at 2016-09-20 05:44 PM | Reply

I mean, Bernie Sanders and Obama are both campaigning for and voting for Clinton, so according to M8, they are "worse than Republicans". And don't get me started on Noam Chomsky, whom that poster is obviously more liberal than.... rofl!

Sometime I forget than M8 took the Miss Hysteria Award only a couple of years ago.

#42 | Posted by Corky at 2016-09-20 05:57 PM | Reply

#20, What State secrets are you talking about? Your point means nothing without some specificity.

#23 | POSTED BY NUTCASE AT 2016-09-20 03:53 PM

He took over 1,500,000 classified documents and released them.

The newspaper that got a Pulitzer for disclosing the PRISM program that you are referring to agrees with the bipartisan panel that the damage that the vast majority of documents he released will cost you, the taxpayer, Billions of dollars.

The Chicago Tribune, Obama's hometown paper, had this to say

Snowden's actions caused immense damage to America's national security interests. A day before the movie's release, a House Intelligence Committee report debunked the myth of Snowden The Noble Whistleblower who did more good than harm. "Snowden's actions did severe damage to U.S. national security, compromising the Intelligence Community's anti-terror efforts and endangering the security of the American people as well as active-duty U.S. troops," the committee said.

American intelligence officials still don't know the full extent of the harm, the report says. Some of the damage may not be known for years. The government has, however, spent hundreds of millions of dollars -- and eventually will spend billions -- to clean up the mess and "mitigate the damage" Snowden caused.

The 22 House committee members sent a unanimous, bipartisan letter to Obama urging him not to pardon Snowden. Bulletin: Democrats and Republicans agreed.

"Edward Snowden is no hero -- he's a traitor who willfully betrayed his colleagues and his country," Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., the committee chairman, said in a statement.

This bears repeating: Democrats and Republicans agreed that Snowden did incalcuable damage to the US. Let that sink in for a few minutes.

#43 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2016-09-20 06:14 PM | Reply

that the damage that the vast majority of documents he released will cost you, the taxpayer, Billions of dollars.

The whole illegal system probably cost more than billions of dollars in the first place. Do we get to count that harm too?

#44 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-20 06:16 PM | Reply

It's funny how often a supposed lawyer is without argument and left only with caricature of the messenger. Wonder how that werks in court?

Obviously it works, or people wouldn't dress up for court (and for church, for that matter.)

#45 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-20 06:18 PM | Reply

Even the two UK papers on the Left call Snowden a traitor:

The Independent: Don't listen to Edward Snowden's supporters – his leaks have been a gift to terrorists

The Observer: The Real Ed Snowden Is a Patsy, a Fraud and a Kremlin-Controlled Pawn

#46 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2016-09-20 06:23 PM | Reply

LOL. Those are both extreme right-wing "opinion" pieces.
Robin Simcox is a Heritage Foundation Fellow and hatchet man.
www.heritage.org
John R. Schindler is, um, a weirdo. blackbag.gawker.com
http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2013/12/how-surveillance-state-insiders-try-to- discredit-nsa-critics/281941/

#47 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-20 06:27 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Last link is this,
www.theatlantic.com

#48 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-20 06:27 PM | Reply

This bears repeating: Democrats and Republicans agreed that Snowden did incalcuable damage to the US. Let that sink in for a few minutes.
#43 | Posted by Rightocenter

What does renegade and maverick Trump say?
Are the mainstream politicians wrong, or did they get this one right?

"Snowden is a spy who should be executed -- but if … he could reveal Obama's records, I might become a major fan," Trump wrote in October 2013. www.politico.com

#49 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-20 06:56 PM | Reply | Funny: 1

I don't care if he exposed government spying on citizens to get rich and famous, to get away from his girlfriend, or just because he hated his boss. It doesn't make what he did any less important.

#50 | Posted by LEgregius at 2016-09-20 10:11 PM | Reply

#43, RoC, nothing specific there. Just a lot of hot air. binLaden killed May 2, 2011. Every newspaper in the world revealed he was tracked down by spying on an accomplices cell phone. Snowden absconded May 20, 2013. Does anyone actually believe in the meantime al Qaida was not aware of NSA tactics, albeit without some of Snowden's specificity.

You want to talk about damage to US national security, talk about FBI spy Walker and his compatriots. Manning only embarrassed the US military, by exposing their violations of international law, is serving 35 years, most of it so far in solitary.

Walker was a bonifide spy, who did it for money and cost many lives and state secrets. Assange, Manning and Snowden are whistleblowers, exposing the excesses, crimes and corruption of the USA deep State, which are unaccountable to anyone for their crimes and mad about having their crimes exposed.

#51 | Posted by nutcase at 2016-09-20 10:46 PM | Reply

This bears repeating: Democrats and Republicans agreed that Snowden did incalcuable damage to the US. Let that sink in for a few minutes.
#43 | POSTED BY RIGHTOCENTER AT 2016-09-20 06:14 PM | FLAG:

but they can put a "billions" number on it, so it's not incalculable.

It's not even "damage" if the system should exist in the first place, that's plugging a government money hole.

#52 | Posted by sitzkrieg at 2016-09-21 10:17 AM | Reply

shouldn't exist

#53 | Posted by sitzkrieg at 2016-09-21 10:17 AM | Reply

Snowden's egalitarian corrosion of concentrated power has already spurred moves toward greater transparency in the national security state and destabilized many institutions, leaving them still somewhat off balance, weakened and predictably vengeful.

How will "the little people" manage to shape this de-stabilized political, economic, and social reality? Will the first post-Snowden US presidential election, for instance, result in the election of Clinton or Trump, both of whom promise only to advance the ecocidal and homicidal policies of the national security state? Or will we deviate from this biophagous trajectory and develop a social world that isn't based on exploitation, war, and terror? Will the well being of all be prioritized over the destructive excesses of the rich? As the status quo continues to kill, and continues to shed popular support, and egalitarian movements gain strength from Standing Rock to India, this remains undetermined. (Elliot Sperber)

#54 | Posted by nutcase at 2016-09-21 10:27 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

#51

Nut, you are talking in circles, first saying that there is no specificity in the articles then admitting that Snowden's "specificity" expanded terrorists knowledge about how we track and find them.

When is the last time that both parties in the House did anything unanimously? Here are more quotes from members of the House Panel:

Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes (R) said, "Edward Snowden is no hero – he's a traitor who willfully betrayed his colleagues and his country. He put our servicemembers and the American people at risk after perceived slights by his superiors. In light of his long list of exaggerations and outright fabrications detailed in this report, no one should take him at his word. I look forward to his eventual return to the United States, where he will face justice for his damaging crimes."

Intelligence Committee Ranking Member Adam Schiff (D) said, "Snowden has long portrayed himself as a truth-seeking whistleblower whose actions were designed solely to defend privacy, and whose disclosures did no harm to the country's security. The Committee's Review -- a product of two years of extensive research -- shows his claims to be self-serving and false, and the damage done to our national security to be profound."

NSA and Cybersecurity Subcommittee Chairman Lynn Westmoreland (R) said, "Edward Snowden made a decision that did more damage to U.S. national security than any other individual in our nation's history. His actions harmed our relationships around the world, endangered American soldiers in warzones, and reduced our allies' collective ability to prevent terrorist attacks. Snowden must be prosecuted and he should receive the full punishment afforded by law for his actions. The resolve of those of us who fully understand the nature of the man and the damage he caused will not falter in our quest to bring him to justice."

NSA and Cybersecurity Subcommittee Ranking Member Jim Himes (D) said, "I appreciate this report and regret only that more of its conclusions cannot be made public. Two things are clear: Snowden stole immense quantities of classified information irrelevant to the important debate on privacy and surveillance, much of which puts at risk our men and women in uniform. Furthermore, this, and Snowden's flight to our adversaries is inconsistent with the estimable tradition of civil disobedience."

Maybe I am alone in this opinion but considering the partisan animosity in every Committee in Congress, to have a unified front by the people who actually have seen what was taken is frightening. Add that to the statement that "Snowden['s]...decision did more damage to U.S. national security than any other individual in our nation's history" (presumably including Walker) and that is pretty damning.

#55 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2016-09-21 01:53 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Do court trials in absentia not occur in the USA? It seems like the Snowden case could be advanced in some way despite him currently living in Russia.

#56 | Posted by GOnoles92 at 2016-09-21 02:41 PM | Reply

#55, RoC, So many words, so many self reinforcing circular arguments, without a single concrete example. If you're going to claim specific damage to our national security you need to site at least one valid example. In #13, I already showed that every statement of the Government against Snowden is a lie, except his exit strategy.

With the notable exception of killing bin Laden, the CIA, FBI, Homeland Security, NSA, Pentagon and State Department have never done their job and even little ol' Snowden ran circles around them all. Being so totally embarrassed its not surprising that they are angry and vengeful. But the statements of those four officials prove absolutely nothing. I have no idea why you even bother to print them. It reminds me of the front pages of the Book of Mormon wherein a number of people attest to the existence of gold plate and magic rocks. So what, its all a bunch of lies.

The committee that devoted 3 years to that task came up with was a pack of lies. I challenge you to come up with something that is actually damaging, which the Walker case reeks of. Which leads to the next question. If you find such a violation, why not prosecute the newspapers that published it? Why just Snowden?

#57 | Posted by nutcase at 2016-09-21 02:47 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Nut-

#13 is meaningless without a source, provide that and I will look at it.

the CIA, FBI, Homeland Security, NSA, Pentagon and State Department have never done their job.

Just so I understand your position, you are basically stating that starting with the Continental Army to the present those agencies have been nothing but a waste of money, who needs them? Obviously, the US would be a safer place without any standing army, air force or navy, Federal law enforcement, border controls, foreign intelligence, diplomacy or even ambassadors. Who cares about classified information anyway, after all, it is just as illusory as Joe Smith and the flaming salamander. The world outside of the US is a benign and wonderful place, we really don't need any of these protections, we should just embrace everyone because we are the source of all the troubles in the world...

Or am I putting words in your mouth?

#58 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2016-09-21 04:47 PM | Reply

If you're going to claim specific damage to our national security you need to site at least one valid example.

How about this for your one example, an NPR article (we all know that they are a mouthpiece for the Government, right) that states that he has shared intelligence with Russia:

MARY LOUISE KELLY: One big question is - what has he been doing since [arriving in Moscow]?

MARK GALEOTTI: The point at which he put his first foot on Russian soil - at that point, he was bought and paid for.

KELLY: That's Mark Galeotti, an authority on Russia spy agencies, also a professor at NYU. He believes Snowden has almost certainly shared what he knows - secrets about NSA operations - with his Russian hosts. I put this question to Frants Klintsevich. He's the equivalent of a senator here in Russia and deputy chairman of the powerful defense and security committee.

FRANTS KLINTSEVICH: (Speaking Russian).

KLINTSEVICH (translated): "Let's be frank," he says. "Snowden did share intelligence. This is what security services do," adds Klintsevich. "If there's a possibility to get information, they will get it."

So Snowden admits he has 1.5M classified documents yet refuses to share them with the FSB? Even when a Russian Member of Parliament admits that he "shared intelligence".

#59 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2016-09-21 05:14 PM | Reply

How about this for your one example

There were zero examples in your one example.

#60 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-21 05:15 PM | Reply

POSTED BY RIGHTOCENTER

I think it's amusing that you and Corky agree about so much. Are you supporting Hillary too?

#61 | Posted by Whatsleft at 2016-09-21 05:16 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Do court trials in absentia not occur in the USA?

Not until Trump gets elected.

#62 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-21 05:16 PM | Reply

Do court trials in absentia not occur in the USA?
Not until Trump gets elected.
#62 | POSTED BY SNOOFY

Why? Where will Hillary be?

#63 | Posted by AndreaMackris at 2016-09-21 05:19 PM | Reply | Funny: 1

There were zero examples in your one example.

#60 | POSTED BY SNOOFY AT 2016-09-21 05:15 PM

Yeah, I guess that a Russian MOP who is also the Deputy Chairman of the Federation Council Defense and Security Committee (which oversees the FSB, GRU and FSTEK) admitting that Snowden shared intelligence isn't what one would consider "an admission against interest." In fact, the Chief of the German Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution, Hans-Georg Maassen, testified before the Bundestag that there was a "high degree of plausibility" that Snowden was, in fact, "a Russian spy."

Nothing to see here, never mind...

#64 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2016-09-21 06:49 PM | Reply

Still no example of Snowden damaging national security...
It's okay, nobody expects you to have one.

#65 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-21 06:51 PM | Reply

I think it's amusing that you and Corky agree about so much. Are you supporting Hillary too?

LOL, I'm not sure who should be more offended by your utter lack of perception, me or Corky.

#66 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2016-09-21 06:51 PM | Reply

Yeah, you are right Snoof, just because none of us have access to the Classified materials that the Russians admit that Snowden shared with him, there is no way that our National Security could have been harmed by him "sharing intelligence."

Keep your head in the sand Ostrich Boy, you will be safer that way.

#67 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2016-09-21 06:54 PM | Reply

him=them

#68 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2016-09-21 06:54 PM | Reply

you will be safer that way.

Unlike you, I don't think I'm safer with Uncle Sam spying on me, which is what Snowden revealed.

#69 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-21 07:06 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

"Unlike you, I don't think I'm safer with Uncle Sam spying on me, which is a small part what Snowden revealed."

FTFY, and unlike you, I am more worried about the other 1.49M classified documents that he took with him that has every Intelligence Agency in NATO and the ASEAN totally freaked out, which has broader geo-political implications than how PRISM affected me personally.

But silly me, it is all about you...

#70 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2016-09-21 07:14 PM | Reply

"Freak out" is the appropriate response when you're running a covert global surveillance ring and someone spills the beans.

#71 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-21 07:20 PM | Reply

You think we should be tapping Merkel's cell phone?
Okay. I don't.

#72 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-21 07:20 PM | Reply

You think we should be tapping Putin's cell phone?
Okay, I do.

#73 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2016-09-21 07:36 PM | Reply

"Freak out" is the appropriate response when you're running a covert global surveillance ring and someone spills the beans.

See, we can agree on something.

Name one major Government that doesn't run a "covert global surveillance ring"...

#74 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2016-09-21 07:38 PM | Reply

Costa Rica.

#75 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-21 07:44 PM | Reply

You're cool with Uncle Sam asking American companies to route their Internet traffic overseas, so it can be collected in bulk beyond the reach Uncle Sam's privacy laws?

#76 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-21 07:46 PM | Reply

It's funny how much you trust the government.
And by funny I don't mean funny.

#77 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-21 07:47 PM | Reply

Costa Rica.

Wrong.

Intelligence and National Security Department (DIS) – Direccion de Inteligencia y Seguridad Nacional runs intelligence gathering and security for Costa Rica.

Care to double down?

#78 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2016-09-21 08:11 PM | Reply

Double down?
You don't seem like the gambling type.
You prefer the perceived safety of Big Brother watching over your every move.

#79 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-21 08:13 PM | Reply

You're cool with Uncle Sam asking American companies to route their Internet traffic overseas, so it can be collected in bulk beyond the reach Uncle Sam's privacy laws?

If you are talking about US v. Microsoft (where Microsoft was ordered to hand over e-mail stored on Irish servers to comply with the drugs case warrant) then you are misunderstanding that case. If you are talking about the US using BGP to force-route traffic to foreign servers to be collected under EO 12333, there is no evidence that is or has happened.

#80 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2016-09-21 08:18 PM | Reply

You don't seem like the gambling type.

And you don't seem like the intelligent type.

You prefer the perceived safety of Big Brother watching over your every move.

Don't get me wrong, I am not cool with it, but it doesn't keep me awake at night because I have nothing to hide.

#81 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2016-09-21 08:21 PM | Reply

Cool, I'll be right over once I'm done with your mom to snoop around to my heart's content.

#82 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-21 08:24 PM | Reply

If you are talking about the US using BGP to force-route traffic to foreign servers to be collected under EO 12333, there is no evidence that is or has happened.

Your trust for Big Brother knows no bounds.

"Several experts in national security law agreed Snowden's scenario is plausible, thanks to holes in international surveillance laws that affect data shared between Americans living in America." www.politifact.com

#83 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-21 08:28 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

www.petsymposium.org

#84 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-21 08:28 PM | Reply

www.schneier.com

I'm sure you'll understand if I agree with Bruce Schneier and not with you.

#85 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-21 08:32 PM | Reply

Prof Schneier and I are talking about the same Paper, we are both way ahead of you...but unlike you, I don't need someone else to tell me what it says.

Reread my #80 slowly so you can understand it.

Cool, I'll be right over once I'm done with your mom to snoop around to my heart's content.

Make sure you get a note from the Emergency Room once they release you.

#86 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2016-09-21 08:46 PM | Reply

So Big Brother can snoop but I can't?
You really do trust the government, don't you?

#87 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-21 08:48 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

#83

I shouldn't be surprised that you think the word "plausible" means "absolutely happening" when dealing with EO 12333 but when it is applied to Snowden "sharing intelligence" it means "never happened".

#88 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2016-09-21 08:48 PM | Reply

This part of #80? "there is no evidence that is or has happened."

Nobody has legal standing to compel the government to reveal such evidence.
And we both know absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.

#89 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-21 08:52 PM | Reply

I shouldn't be surprised that you think the word "plausible" means "absolutely happening"

You think the NSA builds surveillance capacity for the purpose of not using it?

#90 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-21 08:52 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

Do you have a dog in this race?
Very few people know what BGP is.
Is your existence here an NSA smoke screen?

#91 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-21 09:02 PM | Reply

So he steals millions of pages of documents that help the Chinese and Russians then flees first to China then to Russia and according to the Left he is a hero?

Riiiiight.

#2 | Posted by Rightocenter

So he exposes that the terror industrial complex has been spying on every american, he embarrasses them and screws up their methods, and you expect to hear the truth from them about it?

Riiiiiiight.

#92 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2016-09-21 09:17 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

So he steals millions of pages

Copies.

#93 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-21 09:18 PM | Reply

Don't get me wrong, I am not cool with it, but it doesn't keep me awake at night because I have nothing to hide.

#81 | Posted by Rightocenter

www.aclu.org

"You May Have 'Nothing to Hide' But You Still Have Something to Fear

The "nothing to hide" argument mistakenly suggests that privacy is something only criminals desire. In fact, we choose to do many things in private – sing in the shower, make love, confide in family and friends – even though they are not wrong or illegal. Who would not be embarrassed if all of their most intimate details were exposed? Fences and curtains are ways to ensure a measure of privacy, not indicators of criminal behavior. Privacy is a fundamental part of a dignified life.

The "nothing to hide" argument also has things backwards when it suggests that we are all worthy of suspicion until proven otherwise. Our system of justice treats us all as innocent until proven guilty. That applies in everyday life – when the government wants to spy on our daily activities and private conversations – as much as it applies in court. The state bears the burden of showing there is a good reason for suspicion, not the other way around. The refrain "nothing to hide" should not be a license for sweeping government surveillance.

Even if you think you have nothing to hide, you may indeed have something to fear. You might fear for yourself. As Kafka so chillingly illustrates in "The Trial," the prospect of unwarranted government pursuit is terrifying. Or you might fear for our society. Living under the constant gaze of government surveillance can produce long-lasting social harm: if citizens are just a little more fearful, a little less likely to freely associate, a little less likely to dissent – the aggregate chilling effect can close what was once an open society."

#94 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2016-09-21 09:20 PM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

I'm pretty sure this dude works in Fort Meade.

#95 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-21 09:23 PM | Reply

Since you have nothing to hide ROC please state the name of your employer.

#96 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-21 09:24 PM | Reply

Since you have nothing to hide ROC please state the name of your employer.

#96 | Posted by snoofy

Screw that. Tell us the most freaky thing you've masturbated to online.

Tell us the most embarrassing thing you've bought with a credit card.

Tell us when you go to work, what roads you take, what time you get home, what hours your home is empty.

Those are the types of thing the government now gets to know in the name of fighting "terrorism."

#97 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2016-09-21 09:31 PM | Reply

-Screw that. Tell us the most freaky thing you've masturbated to online

"Rosanne Arnold singing the national anthem"

-snoofy

#98 | Posted by eberly at 2016-09-21 09:40 PM | Reply | Funny: 1

I almost compared my singing of the national anthem to Roseanne's, but thought better of it...

#99 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-21 09:48 PM | Reply

With the onset of tattoos I believe people do not want their privacy but would rather shove their beliefs down strangers throats.

Fabr1ct!!

#101 | Posted by mutant at 2016-09-21 10:42 PM | Reply

Again, you don't have to be a personal fan of Snowden to understand and appreciate the scope of the NSA/government abuses revealed by him.

#21 | POSTED BY MODER8 AT 2016-09-20 03:38 PM | REPLY | FLAG

You simply have to be double digits in age and above room temperature in IQ to know this. Strop pretending this wans;t common knowledge and hasn't been since the 1940'S. iT'S EMBARASSING.

Snowden revealed nothing at all but his desire to be a seckrit suprspai.

#102 | Posted by soheifox at 2016-09-22 01:29 AM | Reply

Snowden revealed nothing at all but his desire to be a seckrit suprspai.

Bull. Fscking ----.

Google did not know that the NSA knows "Encryption happens here :)" and that the NSA had bypassed it anyway. www.businessinsider.com

You know nothing about nothing.

#103 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-22 01:59 AM | Reply

#58, RoC, you are definitely putting words in my mouth, a common practice around here.

www.commondreams.org

The USA saved the planet during and after WWII. But then the bureaucracy which built our war machine took over the Government, alarming Eisenhower enough to warn the public not to let the military industrial complex (MIC) take over the country. It is my belief that we live and work under two Governments, one feigns Democracy with periodic elections based largely on personality contests. The other is a bureaucracy based on secrecy, military and financial might, that could care less about morality. The MIC controls most foreign policy and 55% of all discretionary spending. As one author put it, the country can buy one fighter jet or provide 3,158 years of college education, the cost is about the same.

But the practice of Colonialism and Imperialism did not emerge from nothing after WWII. That is really a continuation of practices we learned from the Europeans centuries go. It puts the average American on a path towards a feudal economy, while a small elite "royalty" reap greater rewards than ever.

The USA did not invent slavery, exploitation, torture, military conquest but has attempted to use many of these tactics to dominate the globe since emerging victorious after WWII. Once the decision was made to offshore 60,000 factories, those objectives cannot be realized in the long run, because transferring production diminishes the industrial capacity necessary to support the military and our wealth. Those objectives are immoral anyway. Neither can we ignore the need for defense. But let us not confuse defense with aggression, they are not the same thing. We are unnecessarily aggressive and other people do not appreciate it.

Snowden revealed how the NSA operates outside the law with impunity, not just that they invade our privacy without cause. The author of my link, Barton Gellman, was one of four journalists that received Snowden's downloads. For absolute proof you will have to take the time to call Snowden's high school on just that one point. There is no record of Gellman deliberately lying and there is a long history of the CIA and NSA lying to their bosses in Congress with impunity. You, of course are free to believe whatever source you want. I'm going with Gellman in this case.

#104 | Posted by nutcase at 2016-09-22 11:07 AM | Reply | Newsworthy 1

When the Washington Post publishes Snowden's revelations it has made an implicit determination that that information is in the public's interest. Else it would not have published it. The only other possible explanation is greed. These publications have a duty to protect their sources and instead they turned on him.

#105 | Posted by nutcase at 2016-09-22 12:09 PM | Reply

In the summary, nothing about the actual damage to US interests was outlined in the 36 page HIC report. Much of the content remains fantastic at best, unverifiable and speculative at worst. It fell on the members to focus on the issue of Snowden's own moral fibre, which somehow compromised his revelations. Except the revelations were just pieces of what the NSA and their ilk were doing.

#106 | Posted by nutcase at 2016-09-22 12:13 PM | Reply

ROC is probably stuck in traffic on the Baltimore Washington Parkway right now, on his way to work at Fort Meade, or I'm sure he'd be addressing all these concerns.

My favorite part was when he said he had nothing to hide, then didn't answer any questions. Guess he was lying about having nothing to hide. He's in the right line of work if that's the case.

#107 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-22 01:24 PM | Reply

#104

LOL, I knew it had to be the CommonDreams article written by Gellman (titled "The House Intelligence Committee's Terrible, Horrible, Very Bad Snowden Report"), of course he is going to go to great lengths to protect his source. Indeed, if he doesn't vehemently attack the House Committee Report, then no one is going to buy the book that he mentions 5 times in his article that he is still writing. Also notable is the fact that WashPo wouldn't touch this piece, he had to post it on Common Dreams.

#105

I agree that WashPo made a determination that the PRISM disclosures were in the public interest, but don't you find it odd that they are calling for him to be tried for treason? If that was the only thing that he gave them they wouldn't be so adamant about this.

#106

Its funny how the Snowden apologists scream that the Government isn't going to tell us anything and then uses that as "proof" that he couldn't have compromised National Security.

#108 | Posted by Rightocenter at 2016-09-22 01:37 PM | Reply

I agree that WashPo made a determination that the PRISM disclosures were in the public interest, but don't you find it odd that they are calling for him to be tried for treason?

Plenty of people find it odd.

"In doing so, the Washington Post has achieved an ignominious feat in U.S. media history: the first-ever paper to explicitly editorialize for the criminal prosecution of its own source -- one on whose back the paper won and eagerly accepted a Pulitzer Prize for Public Service." theintercept.com

#109 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-22 01:46 PM | Reply

"proof" that he couldn't have compromised National Security.

What does "compromised national security" even mean?
Does Google knowing that NSA knows "Encryption Happens Here :-)" compromise national security?
Yes or no.

(If no, then please provide an actual example.)

#110 | Posted by snoofy at 2016-09-22 01:47 PM | Reply

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