Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Sunday, August 31, 2014

A nine-year-old girl died at a beach in Lincoln City, Oregon, Friday evening when the sand cave she was digging with her siblings collapsed. Isabel Grace Franks sat down in the hole to see how deep it was and the walls fell in. Rescuers tried frantically to dig her out, and when she was finally pulled free she was unconscious and not breathing. "The people were digging and digging and digging, and it looked like the sand kept collapsing," said witness Tracey Dudley.

Advertisement

Liberal Blog Advertising Network

Menu

Advertisement

Subscriptions

Author Info

rcade

 

Advertisement

MORE STORIES

 

Advertisement

Comments

Admin's note: Participants in this discussion must follow the site's moderation policy. Profanity will be filtered. Abusive conduct is not allowed.

What a shame. Only 9 years old and her life is over. I can only imagine the sorrow her family must be going through.
.

#1 | Posted by CalifChris at 2014-08-31 11:06 PM | Reply | Flag:

Rule of thumb is never get in a hole on the beach that's more than head deep.

#2 | Posted by Tor at 2014-08-31 11:26 PM | Reply | Flag:

Liberals will try to ban sand now...

#3 | Posted by snoofy at 2014-08-31 11:37 PM | Reply | Flag:

At worst Liberals will try to ban people from digging to deep on the beach.

#4 | Posted by Tor at 2014-08-31 11:49 PM | Reply | Flag:

When I think back to being that age, I wonder how I (or my friends) survived.

Grew up in suburban Tampa. My house was on the very absolute outer edge of development in the early 70s. 1000s of acres of woods and swamp. starting within a hundred yards of my front door.

We made good use of those woods. 99% of them are gone now, but the memories remain. These days I just LOOK at the sort of terrain I played in, remember the stuff we did, and wonder how I had as few injuries as I did.

In an ideal world, every kid would have the same.

#5 | Posted by USAF242 at 2014-09-01 12:06 AM | Reply | Flag:

#5 | POSTED BY USAF242

Know exactly what you mean...especially about it all being gone.;/

#6 | Posted by Lohocla at 2014-09-01 12:13 AM | Reply | Flag:

Grew up in suburban Tampa. My house was on the very absolute outer edge of development in the early 70s. 1000s of acres of woods and swamp. starting within a hundred yards of my front door.

We made good use of those woods. 99% of them are gone now, but the memories remain.

LOL I was going to comment on how I had a similar upbringing, until I realized two major differences.

a. I grew up in western NY where poisonous creatures/insects weren't a concern.

b. Those I romped through are luckily still intact. It weirds me out a bit to walk through them again after the years I've been gone. The same yet different.

On topic, I know no one likes to criticize parents after "accidents" like this but I'm going to.

Where were they? Are they f'in stupid? Any moron who's dug in sand knows how easily it fills back in and how impossible it can be to fight it. Allowing a hole to be dug that's deeper than it a. the individuals height or b. than it is wide is just not paying attention.

#7 | Posted by jpw at 2014-09-01 04:34 AM | Reply | Flag:

This happens every year. Damn stupid of the parents to not pay attention to their kids.

#8 | Posted by 726 at 2014-09-01 09:17 AM | Reply | Flag:

Thing is, at nine, I was out in the woods for half a day at a time. Early 1970s, so no cell phone. Now and then a parent would come out looking for a kid, but for most part it was just us kids. (and I don't think our parents realized just how far we roamed. We never saw parents in the deep woods).

And I know that every generation before me, for as long as humanity has existed, and proto-humanity before that, most kids spend a lot of time unsupervised.

Its the tree climbing principle.

My two closest brushes with death were a very very close call with what I am pretty sure was a copperhead, and a truly terrifying fall into a creek during the winter. I was alone, dressed for borderline freezing, because that was the temperature, and slipped on some mud into the water, and DEEP mud. Quicksand effect. I hauled myself out by a tree root. Thinking back, I'm surprised walking home in the soaked clothes did not have more effect, but I brushed that off. That sinking/sucking feeling of terror in the mud, with NO ONE around, I'll remember forever. I would not want to live any other way.

#9 | Posted by USAF242 at 2014-09-01 09:53 AM | Reply | Flag:

Wow, glad you made it, USAF242. Sounds like you had a really close call.

#10 | Posted by CalifChris at 2014-09-01 11:25 AM | Reply | Flag:

Her instinct was to climb into the hole?! When I was her age the riptide nearly sucked me down and out - I have no idea how I survived, but it was terrifying. The Oregon coastal waters are extremely cold and the sand moves en mass right over the shelf and sucks down, down, down. Her parents must be beside themselves with grief at not warning her.

That said, come to beautiful Oregon where the remaining poisonous animals are generally too small to be recognized and the weather made Lewis & Clark exclaim "this land is the Devil's punchbowl".

#11 | Posted by redlightrobot at 2014-09-01 02:40 PM | Reply | Flag:

Advertisement

Post a comment

Comments are closed for this entry.

Home | Breaking News | Comments | User Blogs | Stats | Back Page | RSS Feed | RSS Spec | DMCA Compliance | Privacy | Copyright 2014 World Readable

 

Advertisement

Drudge Retort