Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Sunday, August 31, 2014

The California state legislature enacted a ban on plastic grocery bags on Friday near the end of its two-year session, a measure that if signed into law would become the first of its kind in America. "Single-use plastic bags not only litter our beaches, but also our mountains, our deserts, and our rivers, streams and lakes," said state Senator Alex Padilla, who sponsored the bill. Governor Jerry Brown (D) has not signaled a position on the measure. More than 10 billion plastic bags are used in California each year, according to an estimate by Californians Against Waste.

Advertisement

Liberal Blog Advertising Network

Menu

Advertisement

Subscriptions

Author Info

rcade

 

Advertisement

MORE STORIES

 

Advertisement

Comments

Admin's note: Participants in this discussion must follow the site's moderation policy. Profanity will be filtered. Abusive conduct is not allowed.

This is a great step! We must ban humans next.

#1 | Posted by yougothurt at 2014-08-31 10:51 AM | Reply | Flag:

In San Francisco, at McDonalds, they asked if I wanted a (paper) bag. Not realizing what they were talking about I said yes and was charged 10 cents for the bag (for one burrito).

#2 | Posted by nutcase at 2014-08-31 11:23 AM | Reply | Flag:

I knew this was coming down the pike. Before I even moved from California around 3 years ago they were threatening to get rid of single use plastic bags. But I never saw plastic bags thrown everywhere. People seemed pretty good about putting their all their garbage in trash containers unless things have changed a lot since I left the State. There are a 100 good uses for empty plastic bags and I find this is a needless and stupid idea. And how many trees will now have to be cut down to supply grocery stores with paper bags.

#3 | Posted by CalifChris at 2014-08-31 12:52 PM | Reply | Flag:

This law has been in effect here in Los Angeles since January.

It's bull.

There's no ban on plastic bags.

It's now ten cents for paper bags. Thirty five cents for plastic bags. And a dollar for reusable cloth bags.

This law was created by grocery stores so they can stop providing their customers with free bags in the guise of environmentalism.

#4 | Posted by ClownShack at 2014-08-31 02:03 PM | Reply | Flag:

I remember the big push to replace paper bags with plastic, the more things change the more it remains the same.

By the way, I remember when eggs were good for you, then 'experts' said bad and I'm still not sure what the current thinking on that one is. Also once coffee was bad, not okay, and let us not even get into whether we are causing global warming, or not.

#5 | Posted by MSgt at 2014-08-31 02:43 PM | Reply | Flag:

No big deal, when I was a child, there were no plastic shopping bags, only paper. We folded the bags an put them with our newspapers.The Boy Scouts, paper drive was every 6 months.

#6 | Posted by SammyAZ_RI at 2014-08-31 03:03 PM | Reply | Flag:

No big deal, when I was a child, there were no plastic shopping bags, only paper. We folded the bags an put them with our newspapers.The Boy Scouts, paper drive was every 6 months.

#6 | Posted by SammyAZ_RI

But they didn't CHARGE you for the paper bags.

I'm fine with the ban on plastic bags, but why charge you for paper ones? They were free in the 80s.

#7 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2014-08-31 03:13 PM | Reply | Flag:

By the way, I remember when eggs were good for you, then 'experts' said bad and I'm still not sure what the current thinking on that one is. Also once coffee was bad, not okay, and let us not even get into whether we are causing global warming, or not.

#5 | Posted by MSgt

Yeah, what's up with all these scientists and their scientific process of increasing their understanding of health and science? Why can't they just pick a position and stick to it no matter what evidence is discovered, like us good religious folk do?

#8 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2014-08-31 03:15 PM | Reply | Flag:

Too little, too late.

The entire DuPont family should be dropped seven miles offshore.

#9 | Posted by redlightrobot at 2014-08-31 03:34 PM | Reply | Flag:

Yeah, what's up with all these scientists and their scientific process of increasing their understanding of health and science? Why can't they just pick a position and stick to it no matter what evidence is discovered, like us good religious folk do?

#8 | POSTED BY SPEAKSOFTLY AT 2014-08-31 03:15 PM | FLAG: Love positive progress; hate flip flops just like I cited with the egg and coffee. Todays 'right' science may be debunked tomorrow. HINT: Hum, I wonder what the global warming theorists will be stating in 10 or 15 years [remember the 70s alarmists about heading for an Ice Age?]

#10 | Posted by MSgt at 2014-08-31 05:57 PM | Reply | Flag:

#3 | POSTED BY CALIFCHRIS AT 2014-08-31 12:52 PM | FLAG: FYI, I used to own stock in a paper/timber company years ago. As I study companies which I chose to invest in I learned that each year they plant many more trees than they harvest as wood is a renewable resource. A company does not want to go out of business because they ran out of the product the sell.

#11 | Posted by MSgt at 2014-08-31 06:00 PM | Reply | Flag:

It's ten cents a bag more cry babies.

I have some friends complaining about it but after the shock of not seeing them all over the place sets in I suspect they'll be willing to shell out the pennies for bags when they want 'em.

#12 | Posted by Tor at 2014-08-31 06:17 PM | Reply | Flag:

#11 | Posted by MSgt at 2014-08-31 06:00 PM

Interesting info. Thanks!

#13 | Posted by CalifChris at 2014-08-31 06:29 PM | Reply | Flag:

Is the ass end of paper sacks going to hold up or is it going to separate like they usually do??? They don't make paper sacks like they used to.

#14 | Posted by LarryMohr at 2014-08-31 06:30 PM | Reply | Flag: | Funny: 1

Idiotic. The damage done to the environment by constant logging far outstrips the damage done by easily reusable plastic.

#15 | Posted by soheifox at 2014-08-31 07:53 PM | Reply | Flag:

they plant many more trees than they harvest as wood is a renewable resource. A company does not want to go out of business because they ran out of the product the sell.
#11 | Posted by MSgt

Wood is a renewable resource, yes.
Virgin forest and habitat, not so much.

#16 | Posted by snoofy at 2014-08-31 08:04 PM | Reply | Flag:

easily reusable plastic.
#15 | Posted by soheifox

Plastic grocery bags get reused at most once, for trash or dog poop.
And then go to the landfill or incinerator.
"Easily reusable" is a bit of a canard.
You can't even recycle them with the rest of your plastic.

#17 | Posted by snoofy at 2014-08-31 08:07 PM | Reply | Flag:

We should make biodegradable plastic bags out of corn starch (bio-plastic). They are a little more expensive than oil based plastic, but only last two years in a landfill before turning back into plant food.

And for you hippies out there, what about hemp-starch bio-plastic, or hemp paper? I read that hemp provides 4 times the biomass of wood per acre for making paper, and that's why the logging industry had it banned in America (or is that a hippy conspiracy theory?)

#18 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2014-08-31 08:20 PM | Reply | Flag:

We should make biodegradable plastic bags out of corn starch (bio-plastic). They are a little more expensive than oil based plastic, but only last two years in a landfill before turning back into plant food.
And for you hippies out there, what about hemp-starch bio-plastic, or hemp paper? I read that hemp provides 4 times the biomass of wood per acre for making paper, and that's why the logging industry had it banned in America (or is that a hippy conspiracy theory?)
#18 | Posted by HeliumRat at 2014-08-31 08:20 PM

Actually, it's a lot more considering the crops rotate four times per season. It is a weed, after all.

And even in arid climates hemp is essential for protein and fibers.

The pulpification process for wood fibers is laden with chemicals and pollutes our waterways, destroying ecosystems in less than a decade that have taken tens and hundreds of thousands of years to develop. The forestry industry is a scam - they use machines and hire very few people. Plus, their fake science of clearing old growth for "safety" is the nail in the coffin for the forests. The erosion cannot be corrected and will only continue the encroaching of humans into wildlife areas.

Processed potato starch is an excellent fire retardant - extremely cheap to manufacture, ecologically sound and very practical. Plastics, and basically any shape you want can be made from using both potato starch and long hemp fibers. It's extremely light-weight and durable, I can see vehicles carapace taking advantage of that technology - after the major manufacturers have moved entirely offshore. Which should be complete momentarily.:]

#19 | Posted by redlightrobot at 2014-08-31 09:24 PM | Reply | Flag:

#19 oh, so now you want to put our friends, Tree & Chemical Inc. out of business? ...science hater. And what about all those children who'll be smoking hemp grocery bags??? You support drug abuse??

:-D

#20 | Posted by DeadSpin at 2014-08-31 10:47 PM | Reply | Flag: | Funny: 1

Virgin forest and habitat, not so much.

#16 | POSTED BY SNOOFY AT 2014-08-31 08:04 PM | FLAG: Apples/oranges as timber/paper companies acreage is not virgin forest. Try again.

#21 | Posted by MSgt at 2014-09-01 12:43 AM | Reply | Flag:

SNOOFY: Please read this article and pay attention to this last paragraph:

'The forest resources of the U.S. have continued improving in general condition and quality, as measured by increased average size and volume of trees. This trend has been evident since the 1960s and before. The total forestland acreage has remained stable since 1900.'

Guessing that you were probably born [maybe] after 1960 I believe this information should educate you [and hopefully elate you that we are not losing forestland] on the subject.

#22 | Posted by MSgt at 2014-09-01 12:51 AM | Reply | Flag:

Is "forest resources" what virgin growth becomes when Weyerhauser decides to cut? In other words, before then it's not a forest resource, it's non-productive private property?

Regardless, I am not particularly worried about the health of our forests.
Especially when Canada is happy to ship their forests to us.
But once old growth is gone, it's gone, and it never comes back, and least not in any timescale relevant to policies we can craft.

#23 | Posted by snoofy at 2014-09-01 01:25 AM | Reply | Flag:

Sometimes people will tell you KimWipes are made from virgin forest.
They're made from virgin pulp.
Kind of a big difference. :)

#24 | Posted by snoofy at 2014-09-01 01:30 AM | Reply | Flag:

"Especially when Canada is happy to ship their forests to us."

It always amuses me that I can drive over the border and buy BC lumber in Montana for half the price I'd pay for it in BC.

#25 | Posted by REDIAL at 2014-09-01 01:56 AM | Reply | Flag:

And fill up your tank too!

#26 | Posted by snoofy at 2014-09-01 02:29 AM | Reply | Flag:

But I never saw plastic bags thrown everywhere.

Do you walk around with your eyes closed?

#27 | Posted by jpw at 2014-09-01 03:09 AM | Reply | Flag:

Plastic bags are a problem but plastic bottles are even worse. They are everywhere and they are completely unnecessary. I know we won't ever do it but we should return to the deposit bottle system we had decades ago, then people would search for bottles to turn them in for the deposits.

#28 | Posted by danni at 2014-09-01 08:45 AM | Reply | Flag:

I agree with Danni. When I was a kid, picking soda bottles out of the bar-ditches was how I got my lunch money and if lucky, got enough for a little candy on the walk home. Of course I think it's considered child abuse to make a kid walk or ride a bike to and from school these days.

#29 | Posted by bogey1355 at 2014-09-01 02:30 PM | Reply | Flag:

Several manufacturers have biodegradable plastic sacks, including the big players and smaller companies like Cereplast in Indiana.

What's so hard about bringing cloth shopping bags anyway? Are people too lazy nowadays to exert themselves in such a small way?

#30 | Posted by AMERICANUNITY at 2014-09-01 03:39 PM | Reply | Flag:

What's so hard about bringing cloth shopping bags anyway? Are people too lazy nowadays to exert themselves in such a small way?
#30 | Posted by AMERICANUNITY

At the risk of sounding like a right-winger, people get accustomed to FREE STUFF.

They solved this problem at Shoppers Food Warehouse by charging 3c a bag. As a bonus for them they never have to recycle any of the cardboard boxes food comes in because customers do it for them.

#31 | Posted by snoofy at 2014-09-01 03:43 PM | Reply | Flag:

Danni, I hate to inform you but several states do have deposits for plastic bottles. You can always drive yours to CT, NY, ME, HI, or Oregon. At 5 cents per bottle you should be rich in no time.

#32 | Posted by mcmlcxx at 2014-09-01 04:34 PM | Reply | Flag:

There's far more plastic and metal being used to package your food than one razor thin grocery bag ever thought about having in it.

#33 | Posted by mcmlcxx at 2014-09-01 04:40 PM | Reply | Flag:

Advertisement

Post a comment

Comments are closed for this entry.

Home | Breaking News | Comments | User Blogs | Stats | Back Page | RSS Feed | RSS Spec | DMCA Compliance | Privacy | Copyright 2014 World Readable

 

Advertisement

Drudge Retort