Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Wednesday, August 06, 2014

The federal government has concluded there's a new leaker exposing national security documents in the aftermath of surveillance disclosures by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, U.S. officials tell CNN. Proof of the newest leak comes from national security documents that formed the basis of a news story published Tuesday by the Intercept, the news site launched by Glenn Greenwald, who also published Snowden's leaks. The article cites documents prepared by the National Counterterrorism Center dated August 2013, which is after Snowden flew to Russia to avoid U.S. criminal charges.

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Admin's note: Participants in this discussion must follow the site's moderation policy. Profanity will be filtered. Abusive conduct is not allowed.

Leak here. Leak there. Leak everywhere.

#1 | Posted by coyote at 2014-08-06 08:55 PM | Reply | Flag:

OH Lordy.

Zed is gonna have an epileptic fit.

#2 | Posted by donnerboy at 2014-08-06 08:58 PM | Reply | Flag:

JB Weld works

#3 | Posted by LarryMohr at 2014-08-06 08:59 PM | Reply | Flag:

Keep up the good work Corky!

#4 | Posted by snoofy at 2014-08-06 09:42 PM | Reply | Flag:

At first I thought Snowden was performing a public service by leaking what he uncovered. Then his leaks started to include information which should have remained secret. Now a copycat is in on the act. Before long it will become clear that leakers are doing far more damage to the US than they imagined...

#5 | Posted by catdog at 2014-08-07 08:23 AM | Reply | Flag:

Is there anything more ridiculous than US outrage at having its spy program compromised? Everyone on the planet is supposed to bend over and take US interference with a smile. Otherwise it proves they aren't upstanding citizens with their hearts in the right place. Turnabout is fair play.

#6 | Posted by nutcase at 2014-08-07 09:03 AM | Reply | Flag:

I guess I am not surprised.

I have read some interesting articles and listened to some interviews about and from other former security agency employees who took the "proper path" on whistle blowing - the legal and approved this is how you do it in this agency method. It completely ruined their lives. Instead of the problem being addressed usually they got into trouble themselves. Some even had charges placed against them.

One thing all the other whistle-blowers have said is Snowden learned from them and the failure of the system combined with the hell they went through trying to do it the 'right' way.

#7 | Posted by GalaxiePete at 2014-08-07 02:49 PM | Reply | Flag:

it's more like a faucet they can't turn off.

#8 | Posted by DeadSpin at 2014-08-07 04:27 PM | Reply | Flag:

"Before long it will become clear that leakers are doing far more damage to the US than they imagined...

#5 | Posted by catdog at 2014-08-07 08:23 AM | Reply | Flag:"

There is an easy way to stop it but none of the sociopaths we have in power now or are likely to put in power in the near future will do it:

Stop the NSA domestic spying program. Stop screwing with the public's privacy and any pretense that these people are doing a public service would go away with it. When the state wasn't actively violating the privacy of its own people, people who released state secrets were considered traitors by almost everyone. They only get positive feedback and support now because our goverment is wronging the American public.

#9 | Posted by Sully at 2014-08-07 04:37 PM | Reply | Flag:

Some people deal so poorly with the fast changing new information technologies, the ones some of us have been involved with professionally our entire adult lives.... then whine when other people, some of whom are in government, have the same sorts of challenges.

Becoming Amish might be an option for them.

#10 | Posted by Corky at 2014-08-07 05:04 PM | Reply | Flag:

Some fading minds hint at knowing what others don't and pretend to have a point without actually demonstrating that either is the case as if any of us have ever been fooled by such pussyfooting at any point in their adults lives.... then flag when other people, who are capable of making an actual point, make fun of their bumbling incompetence.

The old folks home might be an option for them.

#11 | Posted by Sully at 2014-08-07 05:18 PM | Reply | Flag: | Funny: 1

#11

You can just feel the poster's desperation in his ad hominem, can't you?

It's what happens when one really has nada to say, but somehow feels compelled to post anyway.

Does the point that technological change, specifically when dealing with national security intel as in this case, is especially challenging when juxtaposed against privacy concerns just fly over his head at supersonic speeds?

Some of us were working with data mining decades ago, in my case, along with SAC installations... so it's not too surprising when those issues make some other people dampen their undies, I guess.

But don't worry, Sully. Be happy. The lawmakers and the agencies seem to be getting a handle on what they can and cannot do, and if you fear the tech that is still coming, you'll have no courage left at all.

#12 | Posted by Corky at 2014-08-07 05:54 PM | Reply | Flag:

But don't worry, Sully. Be happy. The lawmakers and the agencies seem to be getting a handle on what they can and cannot do, and if you fear the tech that is still coming, you'll have no courage left at all.

#12 | Posted by Corky at 2014-08-07 05:54 PM | Reply | Flag:

Not with Obama at the helm continuing Dubya's illegal spying.

#13 | Posted by LarryMohr at 2014-08-07 06:01 PM | Reply | Flag:

Stop the NSA domestic spying program. Stop screwing with the public's privacy and any pretense that these people are doing a public service would go away with it. When the state wasn't actively violating the privacy of its own people, people who released state secrets were considered traitors by almost everyone. They only get positive feedback and support now because our goverment is wronging the American public.

#9 | Posted by Sully at 2014-08-07 04:37 PM | Reply

Couldn't agree more----when we had surveillance of our external enemies (not the imaginary ones), Americans didn't support "traitors". The American government is now the "traitor" and a large growing number of Americans realize it. There will be growing numbers of Edward Snowdens and our government is totally responsible for the phenomenon.

#14 | Posted by matsop at 2014-08-07 06:02 PM | Reply | Flag:

The lawmakers and the agencies seem to be getting a handle on what they can and cannot do,

Yes they can do whatever they want, the cannot do well that seems to be trickier.

Oh and corky just because some of us were not alive to protest Vietnam does not take away our right to protest current injustices by the same folks who perpetrated those injustices. (yes a thread yesterday was too busy being young to bother responding then)

I swear reading your post I seem to always hear boys of summer in the back ground. I saw a deadhead sticker on a cadillac a little voice in my head said don't look back you can never look back.

#15 | Posted by TaoWarrior at 2014-08-07 06:05 PM | Reply | Flag: | Funny: 1 | Newsworthy 1

"Does the point that technological change, specifically when dealing with national security intel as in this case, is especially challenging when juxtaposed against privacy concerns just fly over his head at supersonic speeds?"

You can pretend all you want that saving all our emails and texts and cell phone data is a confusing issue because new technology is confusing and fast changing and blah blah blah. But its a fairly obvious smoke screen. This isn't confusing at all. The government shouldn't be doing it.

One day the person at the top won't have a D after his name. And while the rest of us will have to wait to see how that affects us, it will be the best thing that has ever happened to you. Engaging in constant sophistry can't be good for the mind, body or soul.

#16 | Posted by Sully at 2014-08-07 06:09 PM | Reply | Flag: | Newsworthy 1

Engaging in constant sophistry can't be good for the mind, body or soul.

#16 | Posted by Sully at 2014-08-07 06:09 PM | Reply

That's pretty obvious.

#17 | Posted by matsop at 2014-08-07 06:24 PM | Reply | Flag:

- saving all our emails and texts and cell phone data

All? Well, dear, I'm afraid that never happened. Don't be so dramatic.

-One day the person at the top won't have a D after his name.

You should be ecstatic that it isn't John Bolton and Mitt Romney working all this out with Dick Cheney's advise, as could well have been the case, rather than being afraid of slippery slopes, which are in most cases a logical fallacy anyhow.

#15 | POSTED BY TAOWARRIOR

I flagged that funny, Tao.

#18 | Posted by Corky at 2014-08-08 01:48 AM | Reply | Flag:

"All? Well, dear, I'm afraid that never happened. Don't be so dramatic."

You're lying. The NSA doesn't even deny collecting emails, texts and cell phone data. In fact, it admits to much more.

nsa.gov1.info

"rather than being afraid of slippery slopes"

You're trying to claim that its wrong to be suspicious of people who have been trusted with a tremendous amount of power and who matter of factly abuse it. You're promoting stupidity.

#19 | Posted by sully at 2014-08-08 09:15 AM | Reply | Flag: | Newsworthy 1

The NSA is and has always been a fascist terrorist organization.

Its real function in not protection of the masses, but rather control of them. THAT is what is slowly being exposed. That the entire system is against you and everyone not in power.

#20 | Posted by Shawn at 2014-08-08 02:55 PM | Reply | Flag:

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