Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Tuesday, July 15, 2014

A South Carolina mother was jailed for leaving left her nine-year-old daughter at a nearby park for hours while she worked. Debra Harrell let the child play at Summerfield Park in North Augusta while she worked at a McDonald's 1.5 miles away. A mother found out the child was left there alone on the third day and called police. She's been charged with unlawful conduct towards a child and the girl is in the custody of the Department of Social Services.

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On Reason.Com, Lenore Skenazy writes, "It sounds like Debra Harrell committed a serious, unconscionable crime. The reporter looks ready to burst with contempt. But what are the facts? She let her daughter play at the park for several hours at a time -- like we did as kids. She gave her a daughter a phone if she needed to call. Any "danger" was not only theoretical, it was exceedingly unlikely."

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#1 | Posted by censored at 2014-07-14 02:57 PM | Reply | Flag:

Ah more side effects of the corporate culture that treats employees like disposable pieces of crap that aren't worthy paying enough to afford daycare.

#2 | Posted by 726 at 2014-07-14 03:10 PM | Reply | Flag: | Newsworthy 1

#2

see a little irony in that complaint? you want this woman to make more but you also want the daycare employees to make more also, don't you?

if you want wages to rise then some prices are going to have to rise along with it....like daycare wages.

#3 | Posted by eberly at 2014-07-14 03:13 PM | Reply | Flag:

When I was 9, my parents let me wander the Las Vegas strip for hours at a time. I got to know the concierge at various hotels and would get free food.

You'd think in a red state like Georgia they would applaud the mother for helping to make her child self reliant.

#4 | Posted by lee_the_agent at 2014-07-14 03:17 PM | Reply | Flag: | Newsworthy 2

#3 The status quo is obviously working so well.

#5 | Posted by 726 at 2014-07-14 03:22 PM | Reply | Flag: | Newsworthy 1

#3

If only there were some way to make sure everyone who worked for a living had enough to pay for their essentials. It truly is one of those unanswerable mysteries for the ages.

#6 | Posted by censored at 2014-07-14 03:25 PM | Reply | Flag:

#5

no, not really. But I really think some here do not understand the reality of inflation. You're complaining about her wages and that she can't afford daycare, which is probably very expensive considering her income. I'm merely pointing out that rising wages means rising wages and the costs associated with paying for them.

#7 | Posted by eberly at 2014-07-14 03:25 PM | Reply | Flag:

#6

if only.....

#8 | Posted by eberly at 2014-07-14 03:30 PM | Reply | Flag:

#7 I suppose a public daycare option, like that provided through much of Europe, would be anathema? Or maybe it is just a myth, like unicorns, or decent socialized medicine?

#9 | Posted by censored at 2014-07-14 03:32 PM | Reply | Flag:

The way I understand the law, it makes no difference the kid was alone at the park. At that age, a child at HOME without adult supervision is a criminal offence.

#10 | Posted by CrisisStills at 2014-07-14 03:38 PM | Reply | Flag:

#9

don't we have that in some places here in the US?

I'd be curious to see how that works. I feel for the woman in this thread as she appears to be trying to work her way out of this problem. I'm sure she has considered just staying at home and receive welfare.....but she isn't.

so I agree...I wish we had a way to help folks like this better.

#11 | Posted by eberly at 2014-07-14 03:41 PM | Reply | Flag: | Newsworthy 1

I was home alone, out and about at 9. I think we coddle kids too much these days.

#12 | Posted by kwrx25 at 2014-07-14 03:50 PM | Reply | Flag: | Newsworthy 1

Oh Gee what to do, what to do...When we were kids we rode bike without helmets, rode in cars without seatbelts,drank from lead sippie cups, cooked food for siblings, mowed the lawn,and all others dangers without a cell phone to call for help... KWRX25 is right, we coddle kids too much these days

#13 | Posted by cmbell73 at 2014-07-14 04:08 PM | Reply | Flag: | Newsworthy 2

So this stems from the woman not making enough to afford care for her child.

Do you believe Obama's immigration reform will help raise her wages?

Hmmm, in the end Obama is part of the war on women?

#14 | Posted by sawdust at 2014-07-14 08:54 PM | Reply | Flag:

"I was home alone, out and about at 9. I think we coddle kids too much these days." #12 | POSTED BY KWRX25

So was I and just about everyone else but it was a different era and doesn't change the fact that it is against the law.

#15 | Posted by CrisisStills at 2014-07-15 09:07 AM | Reply | Flag:

At 9 during the summer I would ride my bike to the pool at 7AM for swim team then when that was over the pool would open and I would stick around. I would stay till around 2 and ride my bike to the park where all the other neighborhood kids would be. We would find a stick and have massive wars for a few hours. Then we would head home. I usually got home around 6 would take a shower and my parents would roll in about the time I finished my shower.

I would see my parents for a couple hours a day over dinner the rest of the day I was free.

It was the greatest time in my life. Kinda makes me feel bad for kids today.

#16 | Posted by TaoWarrior at 2014-07-15 09:24 AM | Reply | Flag:

Couldn't wait to leave in the morning as a kid, usually out all day. Got grounded for not being in by dark (or sneaking out after) constantly. Only problem I see here is a stupid law, not a bad parent.

#17 | Posted by zeropointnrg at 2014-07-15 09:52 AM | Reply | Flag:

Wait.. what? When I was 9 I went to the park on my own all the time.

#18 | Posted by soheifox at 2014-07-15 10:08 AM | Reply | Flag:

Wait.. what? When I was 9 I went to the park on my own all the time.

#18 | Posted by soheifox at 2014

When I was younger than that I was walking miles through the countryside. That was the norm. Different time, perhaps. The only expectation was that I was home by dinner.

#19 | Posted by Zed at 2014-07-15 10:36 AM | Reply | Flag:

Oh Gee what to do, what to do...When we were kids we rode bike without helmets, rode in cars without seatbelts,drank from lead sippie cups, cooked food for siblings, mowed the lawn,and all others dangers without a cell phone to call for help... KWRX25 is right, we coddle kids too much these days

#13 | POSTED BY CMBELL73

Don't forget holding onto the back bumper of a car on a snow filled road and going for a ride while trying to stay on your feet.;P That was great fun for us kids back in the 70's....course, cars don't have "bumpers" anymore ..

#20 | Posted by Lohocla at 2014-07-15 10:46 AM | Reply | Flag:

Leaving a nine-year-old girl alone at a public park for an entire work shift day after day is not wise. She'd be easy pickings for an adult predator who realized she wasn't being supervised.

I sympathize with the mother's plight, but it makes sense that child welfare officials would inquire into the situation.

What's unfortunate is that child welfare officials are often completely overzealous in how they handle stuff like this. What should happen is the mother get a warning to find supervision for her child, some counseling and a probated sentence at most.

But they've already taken the kid away from her, so who knows how much of a nightmare that family is now trapped in.

#21 | Posted by rcade at 2014-07-15 10:53 AM | Reply | Flag:

Weird, according to the Latchkey kids website Georgia guidelines recommend no younger than 8 to be left alone at home. I understand why the park would be a bad choice, but if this info about home is wrong they need to update it...

I found this info here

#22 | Posted by justagirl_idaho at 2014-07-15 10:56 AM | Reply | Flag:

Wait.. what? When I was 9 I went to the park on my own all the time.

#18 | POSTED BY SOHEIFOX

Yeah, same here. Kids would come over and we'd be gone til dinner, then out again til the lights came on plus we didn't have phones back then.

Also, we didn't have a park in my neighborhood, so we went out to a big backfill hill that was in back of the apartments (probably a good 60 feet up). Used to put ramps at the bottom and jump our bikes off. Lots of scrapes from that and, no joke, we rubbed some dirt on it, dried off the tears and got back on and forgot about it til you got home and mom cleaned it up and gave you an old school "hurts like hell when you take it" off bandaid.

"sigh" I'm feeling old about now haha.

#23 | Posted by Lohocla at 2014-07-15 10:59 AM | Reply | Flag:

"The state of Florida's minimum age requirement is 18 years old while this same age requirement is 14 years old in Illinois. The following states have a minimum age requirement of 12 years old for the child to be able to stay home alone: Colorado, Delaware and Kansas. The state of Michigan has a minimum age requirement of 11 years old while Oregon, Tennessee and Washington require the child to be at least 10 to be able to stay home unsupervised. North Dakota requires the child to be at least 9 years. Georgia, Maryland, North Carolina and South Carolina have a law stating that no child under 8 years old should be left alone at home."

I found this on legalsource360

#24 | Posted by justagirl_idaho at 2014-07-15 11:01 AM | Reply | Flag:

#21

Isn't it possible there is more to this story that is causing officials to take the child away?

why on earth would you burden social services, etc..if this is the only thing that has happened with this mother?

I have to believe that there are other reasons why they took the kid.

at least I hope so.....because if not, this is a huge overreach by law enforcement and child welfare officials.

#25 | Posted by eberly at 2014-07-15 11:28 AM | Reply | Flag:

I don't buy it's a different world... it's only that way because of helicopter parenting.

--- happened when we were kids, but it wasn't fixated on.

#26 | Posted by kwrx25 at 2014-07-15 11:40 AM | Reply | Flag:

Yes, I think we do coddle our kids too much today, but we all need to acknowledge that this is not the America we lived in when we were kids. I spent every summer day with a BB gun and a fishing pole. As long as I was within whistling distance from home, I was fine. And if I wanted to go further, I just needed to tell Mom and Dad I was adventuring up-creek or down-creek, or whatever. Did I do some really stupid stuff that would absolutely terrify me if my daughter did it today? YOU BETCHA. Would I let her do that today? NOT A CHANCE. I suppose the flip side of the coin exists in the parents that don't care what their kids are doing, how they're doing in school, or where their kids' next meal comes from. I guess I'm happy to be on the coddling side of parenting.

#27 | Posted by MUSTANG at 2014-07-15 11:42 AM | Reply | Flag:

They couldn't just warn the poor woman never to do that again. Instead they will bankrupt a McDonalds employee and run away with her child, all supposedly for the good of the child.

#28 | Posted by nutcase at 2014-07-15 11:45 AM | Reply | Flag:

I don't buy it's a different world... it's only that way because of helicopter parenting.

There are three registered sex offenders living within a mile of that park, 22 within two miles:

www.icrimewatch.net

It's a different world today because we're more aware of the risk of sexual predators, not just because we overprotect our kids. Though an abduction is unlikely, it's not so remote a possibility that we should let young kids go unsupervised day after day at a public park -- a place where predators would obviously go looking for children to victimize.

#29 | Posted by rcade at 2014-07-15 11:58 AM | Reply | Flag:

I guess I'm happy to be on the coddling side of parenting.

Me too. But it's hard to know when you are not giving a kid the freedom necessary to grow up.

I had a lot of freedom in my neighborhood in years 8-12. I could ride my bike anywhere within a mile or two with my friends, and then later was a latchkey kids while my mom worked.

#30 | Posted by rcade at 2014-07-15 11:59 AM | Reply | Flag:

Also, a big factor is where you live. Not sure about the neighborhood in this story, but mine is one of the safest I've ever encountered, the main reason why I chose to live there. My 13 year old has free liberty to walk, bike, or skate to and from school, to park or to friends house, but my 9 year old does not, yet. There's plenty of factors for parents to decide at what age to allow a child that extra liberty.

#31 | Posted by CrisisStills at 2014-07-15 12:27 PM | Reply | Flag:

Well, she was trying.

#32 | Posted by fresno500 at 2014-07-15 12:47 PM | Reply | Flag:

The biggest problem I can see is that the mother didn't do a good enough job of teaching her kid not to talk to strange adults. And she should have been especially instructed never to tell a strange adult that her parent isn't around.

When the busybody who reported the mother asked the little where her mother is, the little girl should have responded "I don't speak to ugly strangers." And if the woman persisted the kid should have started screaming "Get away from me! You're not my mom! I don't want to come over your house to try on bathing suits!"

Seriously though, kids should know: Dont' talk to strangers. Don't tell unknown adults your name. Don't tell them where your parents are. Don't get close to their cars. Don't let them give you anything to eat or drink. If they won't leave you alone, run away and start screaming. Etc.

Especially true if the kid is going to the park alone.

#33 | Posted by Sully at 2014-07-15 01:01 PM | Reply | Flag:

Seriously though, kids should know: Dont' talk to strangers.

Let's say the mom successfully teaches the kid to always be suspicious of strangers and never talk to them.

But what happens if she gets seriously hurt at that park and needs help, and her phone isn't working?

Teaching kids all strangers are bad means they can never turn to one for help. Then where will they be in an emergency if the parent can't be found?

One of my sons got lost at around age 3 in a mall, causing my wife and her sister to freak out as they frantically searched for him.

A kind adult woman saw him alone and helped him be found.

#34 | Posted by rcade at 2014-07-15 02:04 PM | Reply | Flag:

"But what happens if she gets seriously hurt at that park and needs help, and her phone isn't working?"

My mother would say she'd be fine dying under those circumstances so long as her kids know not to talk to strangers.

My answer would be that you can tell kids 1,000,000 times never to talk to strangers as an absolute and 99% of them are still going to take it with a grain of salt. Realistically a kid is going to be going crazy screaming for help if mom is hurt.

I was a kid when they found that little boy's head in a field and made a TV movie about it. Freaked the hell out of my mother and she probably went overboard with the warnings. I still didn't take "don't talk to strangers" as seriously as was intended. But the stuff about behaviors to avoid made a bigger impact. I was a kid who always had to know "why" certain things were wrong before I really believed I shouldn't do them. And I was told "why" certain behaviors coming from strange adults are suspect.

My little brother had some guy testing him when he was about 5 or 6 years old. He was two houses down waiting for is friend to come outside. My brother knew not to get near the car or answer any questions and he ran home. Had it not been drilled into his head not to answer questions and not to get near the car it could have been tragic.

"Teaching kids all strangers are bad means they can never turn to one for help. Then where will they be in an emergency if the parent can't be found?"

I had a list that included relatives, neighbors, parents of my friends, etc who were OK to go to for help.

"One of my sons got lost at around age 3 in a mall, causing my wife and her sister to freak out as they frantically searched for him.

A kind adult woman saw him alone and helped him be found."

I think 3 years old is too young to tell kids this anyway. My niece is three and she's smart but this would confuse her.

#35 | Posted by Sully at 2014-07-15 02:30 PM | Reply | Flag:

"But what happens if she gets seriously hurt at that park and needs help, and her phone isn't working?"

My mother would say she'd be fine dying under those circumstances so long as her kids know not to talk to strangers.

My answer would be that you can tell kids 1,000,000 times never to talk to strangers as an absolute and 99% of them are still going to take it with a grain of salt. Realistically a kid is going to be going crazy screaming for help if mom is hurt.

I was a kid when they found that little boy's head in a field and made a TV movie about it. Freaked the hell out of my mother and she probably went overboard with the warnings. I still didn't take "don't talk to strangers" as seriously as was intended. But the stuff about behaviors to avoid made a bigger impact. I was a kid who always had to know "why" certain things were wrong before I really believed I shouldn't do them. And I was told "why" certain behaviors coming from strange adults are suspect.

My little brother had some guy testing him when he was about 5 or 6 years old. He was two houses down waiting for is friend to come outside. My brother knew not to get near the car or answer any questions and he ran home. Had it not been drilled into his head not to answer questions and not to get near the car it could have been tragic.

"Teaching kids all strangers are bad means they can never turn to one for help. Then where will they be in an emergency if the parent can't be found?"

I had a list that included relatives, neighbors, parents of my friends, etc who were OK to go to for help.

"One of my sons got lost at around age 3 in a mall, causing my wife and her sister to freak out as they frantically searched for him.

A kind adult woman saw him alone and helped him be found."

I think 3 years old is too young to tell kids this anyway. My niece is three and she's smart but this would confuse her.

#36 | Posted by Sully at 2014-07-15 02:30 PM | Reply | Flag:

I will say that I was probably taught to be a little too suspicious as a kid. My brothers probably got more reasonable instructions than I did.

I went to Catholic school and they had this priest from Africa who was a psychologist come in and talk to all the kids one on one. He wanted to hold my hand while we spoke and that was out of the question. He's lucky I didn't leave the room after that request. Then he started asking alot of personal questions about my parents. I was evasive/defensive. Then I went home and ratted him out to my mother who called the school.

She's lucky she called them first. He was asking questions to make sure kids weren't being abused and felt loved at home and my evasiveness was a warning sign to him. He thought maybe I was protecting an abusive parent. But they had to concede that as a child I had no way of telling the difference between what this guy was doing and genuine creepy behavior (taking a kid to a room by himself, trying to find out if I had lax parents, wanting to hold hands).

That said, if there was a molestor priest at that schoool he definitely would have picked an easier target.

#37 | Posted by Sully at 2014-07-15 02:45 PM | Reply | Flag:

I had a list that included relatives, neighbors, parents of my friends, etc who were OK to go to for help.

I'm not talking about people you know in some capacity. I'm talking about real strangers. My wife taught the kids that if they were ever completely lost in a public place, they should find an older woman and ask for help. Women are far less likely to be predators.

He wanted to hold my hand while we spoke and that was out of the question.

Creepy. I was invited to be an altar boy at my Catholic Church when I was 12. I said no -- I'm not a joiner and it seemed like a hassle. A kid my age who said yes was molested by a priest at that church and eventually committed suicide.

#38 | Posted by rcade at 2014-07-15 03:16 PM | Reply | Flag:

if you want wages to rise then some prices are going to have to rise along with it....like daycare wages.
#3 | Posted by eberly

You're out of the loop. Daycare is already so expensive that it's not worth sending your kids to daycare unless you're earning about $15-20/hr.

We've built an economy which does a woefully inadequate job of rewarding the participation of the bottom 80% of households. Now we're criminalizing people's rational attempts to navigate their impoverished plight.

Who here will say the right thing for this person to do was to quit their job to be with their child? That's what society expects. But we also expect people to have a job. It's a catch-22.

#39 | Posted by snoofy at 2014-07-15 03:25 PM | Reply | Flag:

Now we're criminalizing people's rational attempts to navigate their impoverished plight.

Leaving your 9-year-old alone at a park day after day is not rational. The mom could have found another single mom and watched each other's kids when not picking up shifts, among other possible solutions.

#40 | Posted by rcade at 2014-07-15 03:29 PM | Reply | Flag:

You're out of the loop. Daycare is already so expensive that it's not worth sending your kids to daycare unless you're earning about $15-20/hr.

And that is if you only have one kid. We have 3 and it would take 15 an hour to break even on daycare. Not worth working if all your money goes to day care. 20 an hour would leave you with about 150-200 bucks a week after tax and daycare.

#41 | Posted by TaoWarrior at 2014-07-15 03:34 PM | Reply | Flag:

The mom could have found another single mom and watched each other's kids when not picking up shifts, among other possible solutions.

That can be tricky to work out. My wife is a stay at home mom and she watches a little boy for the mom for 20 bucks a day. However the daycare laws are nuts for trying to do that for more than 1 kid.

Maybe if we eased up on the daycare regulations more moms could do it but as it is you are walking a fine line watching anyone's kid.

#42 | Posted by TaoWarrior at 2014-07-15 03:38 PM | Reply | Flag:

Creepy. I was invited to be an altar boy at my Catholic Church when I was 12. I said no -- I'm not a joiner and it seemed like a hassle. A kid my age who said yes was molested by a priest at that church and eventually committed suicide.

#38 | Posted by rcade at 2014-07-15 03:16 PM | Reply | Flag:

Yeah, I was creeped out, that's why I still remember it.

You just reminded me of the time I was unsuccessfully recruited to be an altar boy, which was also kind of creepy. By this time I was out of the Catholic school. A guidance counseler from the high school was active at the church and asked me if I wanted to be an altar boy and I said no. Then he tried to coerce me. "You'll be going to HS next year and I might be your counseler. Wouldn't it be neat if you already knew me?" At the time, I took it as a threat as in "If you don't do this and you have me as a guidance counseler, I will take it out on you somehow". But there was also a creepy vibe to it. In retrospect he could have been some kind of perv too. I'm not good at hiding my emotions so when he saw the look on my face he gave up.

#43 | Posted by Sully at 2014-07-15 04:07 PM | Reply | Flag:

Now the mother has a criminal record to add to the burden.

#44 | Posted by fresno500 at 2014-07-15 04:25 PM | Reply | Flag:

Now the mother has a criminal record to add to the burden.

Tragic. But it's still possible the charges could be dropped or a plea could eventually expunge them.

#45 | Posted by rcade at 2014-07-15 04:50 PM | Reply | Flag:

the question is "Did the child have clean underwear on?" I know my mom always worried about that....

#46 | Posted by MUSTANG at 2014-07-15 05:54 PM | Reply | Flag:

She should have just given the kid a gun. Then she'd be safe.

#47 | Posted by TFDNihilist at 2014-07-15 07:43 PM | Reply | Flag:

#21
Isn't it possible there is more to this story that is causing officials to take the child away?
why on earth would you burden social services, etc..if this is the only thing that has happened with this mother?
I have to believe that there are other reasons why they took the kid.
at least I hope so.....because if not, this is a huge overreach by law enforcement and child welfare officials.
#25 | Posted by eberly at 2014-07-15 11:28 AM

I agree. There apparently is a real and present danger - in their apartment.

Rcades suggestion of counseling is the obvious first step, and IMO the authorities found something else in their lives that prevented that.

Time will tell.

#48 | Posted by redlightrobot at 2014-07-16 02:27 AM | Reply | Flag:

i think for a 9-year-old to be alone in the park for a pattern of days is dangerous, no question. i also believe the regulatory agency is being heavy handed. A warning would have been appropriate; i'm just less trusting about government agencies being on the side of the public than some folks here. There are plenty of atrocities that have taken place within the system.

#49 | Posted by kenx at 2014-07-16 02:55 AM | Reply | Flag:

This is ridiculous! When we were kids, ALL of us were out of the house all the time - certainly by age 9, especially during the summer months off school, hanging out in parks, playing baseball in the streets, bike races in the local prairies or in the alleyways - there were NO stop signs in our neighborhood and we all rode our bikes without helmets in the middle of the streets at full speed. No one got hurt beyond what they themselves could manage and no one ran home crying to mommy. If there was a stranger in the neighborhood, kids knew better than to go with them. Kids used to fight back, back then. We stayed out after dinner without our parents or any guardians until the streetlights came on - that was the standard for nearly every kid in our blue-collar neighborhood in the Chicago south suburbs. Times have not changed that much, but parenting has gotten worse with all these helicopter Gen Xers who do nothing but coddle and neglect their kids by hovering constantly and making them unprepared to handle the real world. This is the most ridiculous and frustrating thing to watch happening to our children. No one is going to be ready for the world at this rate, and look at the proof. Kids today are dumber, less informed, more obese and out of shape than ever - with ALL these protections.

#50 | Posted by frwlbrng at 2014-07-16 08:45 AM | Reply | Flag:

When we were kids, ALL of us were out of the house all the time - certainly by age 9, especially during the summer months off school, hanging out in parks, playing baseball in the streets, bike races in the local prairies or in the alleyways ...

True, but there's a downside to the lack of supervision. I know of four people my age who were molested back then, too.

One time my siblings and I were attending a movie and a creepy kid tried to lure us into a bathroom, telling us we could go there to see an adult playing with himself.

We were like "thanks for warning us -- we won't be going there!"

The look on his face said "hmm, I must be doing this wrong."

#51 | Posted by rcade at 2014-07-16 11:06 AM | Reply | Flag:

But they've already taken the kid away from her, so who knows how much of a nightmare that family is now trapped in.

Another ironic piece of this is that social services/government is willing to pay for foster care whereas the amount paid for foster care could have gone into daycare. Also, now the state is forced to pay to house and feed a new inmate; someone that previously was a productive, tax paying member of society!!!

#52 | Posted by FedUpWithPols at 2014-07-16 11:28 AM | Reply | Flag: | Newsworthy 3

#52

NW

#53 | Posted by eberly at 2014-07-16 11:29 AM | Reply | Flag:

#40-Leaving your 9-year-old alone at a park day after day is not rational. The mom could have found another single mom and watched each other's kids when not picking up shifts, among other possible solutions.

What about moms who send their children alone on a 1200 mile journey to the US? It seems like those moms are being celebrated.

#54 | Posted by homerj at 2014-07-16 01:17 PM | Reply | Flag:

#52 | Posted by FedUpWithPols

Succinctly describes the Republican plan for society.

#55 | Posted by TFDNihilist at 2014-07-16 01:24 PM | Reply | Flag:

It seems like those moms are being celebrated.

#54 | POSTED BY HOMERJ AT 2014-07-16 01:17 PM | FLAG:

and rewarded with free child care.

#56 | Posted by sitzkrieg at 2014-07-16 03:43 PM | Reply | Flag:

RE #52 Seems we never learn.

I too was left to my own resources a child. Thinking back I can't believe how free I was. Mom wanted us OUT of the house all day even though she was there most of the time (as long as my chores were done we were to be gone). In those days I wasn't even expected to be home until after the street lights came on.

#57 | Posted by donnerboy at 2014-07-16 04:43 PM | Reply | Flag:

I remember an incident when I was a kid (mid 1950s when I was about 8 or 9) that had my parents in stitches. I was going to see a buddy of mine when my mother passed me in a car going in the opposite direction. She stopped and asked where I was going. And, as I had so often heard my parents say when they didn't want people meddling in their business, I replied: "I'm going to see a man about a dog".

Those were different times.

#58 | Posted by FedUpWithPols at 2014-07-17 09:55 AM | Reply | Flag:

Where is McDonalds on all this. Why do they not have somewhere for the child to stay? Don't they have a kid zone where this child could hang out while mom is working?

#59 | Posted by Marty at 2014-07-17 10:17 AM | Reply | Flag:

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