Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Verlasso, a joint venture by AquaChile and Dupont, is the first ocean-raised farmed Atlantic salmon to receive the Good Alternative recommendation from the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch program. The Chilean-based farm aims to produce salmon with minimal impact on the environment. Verlasso has reduced the amount of fish necessary to feed their salmon by 75 percent. "Our goal is to develop practices that help us have salmon in seven generations, not just the immediate future," said Scott Nichols, a director at Verlasso. "The problem is that it takes about four pounds of captured wild feeder fish to provide the fish oil required to raise one pound of salmon. ... Verlasso has decreased the fish in to fish out ratio for fish oil by 75 percent. We do this by feeding the fish a yeast that makes the essential omega-3s."

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Farm raised fish contain antibiotics are are often fed feces.

Wild caught fish are filled with toxins and heavy metals from human pollution.

Pathetic how people can take one of the most nutritious and simple food sources and screw it up.

#1 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2014-05-27 02:10 PM | Reply | Flag:

Farm raised fish contain antibiotics are are often fed feces.

Wild caught fish are filled with toxins and heavy metals from human pollution.

#1 | Posted by SpeakSoftly

So what do you eat?

#2 | Posted by Whatsleft at 2014-05-27 02:25 PM | Reply | Flag:

It's always good to hear about producers trying to clean up our food.

In addition to using more sustainable feed, it looks like this company is setting a new standard in farm raised fish by 1) letting their farms lie fallow for 3-6 months to clear out the water after every crop of fish 2) giving the fish room to move and 3) farming in deep (60-80 meter) strong tidal-flow water to give the water a chance to recirculate. The price of $15 per pound will probably put it out of reach for most, though.

#3 | Posted by censored at 2014-05-27 02:27 PM | Reply | Flag:

So what do you eat?

#2 | Posted by Whatsleft

I eat them both, since there's really no alternatives available for american consumers. Our corporations only allow us to choose between antibiotics or heavy metals. I eat occasional red meat, frequent pork and chicken, always organic if it's available.

#4 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2014-05-27 02:31 PM | Reply | Flag:

so.................. what's your point with the post spe?

#5 | Posted by Sniper at 2014-05-27 02:58 PM | Reply | Flag:

so.................. what's your point with the post spe?

#5 | Posted by Sniper

What the hell is your point with any of your posts?

#6 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2014-05-27 03:10 PM | Reply | Flag: | Newsworthy 10

Wild caught salmon are probably your best bet for good omega 3 and protein to mercury contamination ratios. Unless you want to go the route of small oily fish like smelt, which I can't say I really care for. It's the larger ones like tuna that tend to be both more contaminated and unsustainably fished. Which is unfortunate, because I love tuna.

At least, that's what I've read. YMMV.

#7 | Posted by zeropointnrg at 2014-05-27 03:45 PM | Reply | Flag:

#6 is probably a DR all time NewsWorthy Post.

#8 | Posted by ClownShack at 2014-05-27 03:48 PM | Reply | Flag: | Newsworthy 1

anyway, on topic.

you ever eaten farm raised salmon and wild salmon?

The farm raised stuff tastes awful. :P The meat has a different texture, its more fatty, its a different color...

we're killing our food supplies due to overpopulation.

#9 | Posted by ClownShack at 2014-05-27 03:51 PM | Reply | Flag:

The farm raised stuff tastes awful. :P The meat has a different texture, its more fatty, its a different color...

we're killing our food supplies due to overpopulation.

#9 | Posted by ClownShack

Well almost all salmon is artificially colored to make it that orange-pink.

We're all just guinea pigs in food corps' massive science experiments.

And the mercury in fish comes largely from coal burning power plants. When you argue against green energy, you're arguing FOR mercury in your food.

#10 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2014-05-27 04:58 PM | Reply | Flag: | Newsworthy 1

The farm raised stuff tastes awful. :P The meat has a different texture, its more fatty, its a different color...
we're killing our food supplies due to overpopulation.
#9 | Posted by ClownShack
Well almost all salmon is artificially colored to make it that orange-pink.
We're all just guinea pigs in food corps' massive science experiments.
And the mercury in fish comes largely from coal burning power plants. When you argue against green energy, you're arguing FOR mercury in your food.
#10 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2014-05-27 04:58 PM

Uh, WHAT?! They color salmon meat? No wonder it looks so unnaturally bright in the displays. Thank goodness we only buy ours fresh from local Tribal fishermen. In season one guy parks in front of a CostCo near the airport with a truck loaded with coolers and fresh Chinook salmon. Very reasonably priced and far superior in quality than what appears at our local Fred Meyer.

Some of my fondest memories growing up are the Tribes salmon bakes we would drive to along the coast near Garibaldi and Pacific City. That was typically lean, almost flaky meat and quite easily the best we can get in the Northwest, which is probably the best outside of Alaska, although I had no idea at the time.

Since the rivers are too polluted now, and once the fracking disasters eradicate all life in them, there will be no alternative but privately farmed animals for consumption. But, it's still interesting to see a group attempting to profit from this environmental decline. "aquaculture" - well, these animals are designed to travel the globe, I imagine that keeping them nearly stationary is just going to inbreed fatter and fatter fish until we no longer recognize them as salmon.

#11 | Posted by redlightrobot at 2014-05-27 05:47 PM | Reply | Flag:

A few years ago I had the opportunity to sample farm-raised salmon side-by-side with fresh caught salmon out of Lake Michigan.

I was surprised at how different they tasted. Overall, I gave a slight nod to the wild salmon, but I thought the farm raised fish was quite good.

#12 | Posted by JeffJ at 2014-05-27 05:50 PM | Reply | Flag:

This topic reminds me of something I read in the ships log of Don Felipe Gonzalez "re-discovering" the 50 mile in circumference Rapa Nui (Easter Island):

"The fields are uncultivated save some small plots of ground, in which they sow beds of yuca, yams, sweet potatoes, and several plantations of plantains and sugar-cane : but all very tasteless, as if from want of cultivation."

#13 | Posted by redlightrobot at 2014-05-27 06:46 PM | Reply | Flag:

What the hell is your point with any of your posts?

#6 | Posted by SpeakSoftly

OH.............. great answer.

#14 | Posted by Sniper at 2014-05-27 07:06 PM | Reply | Flag:

The best salmon was young ones caught in lake superior. The old ones tasted wrong. China can export all our fish needs and is currently cornering this market. Google earth the coast of China and you will see how extensive the farms are for Chinese seafood. To get an oooœ u need to be an alien.

#15 | Posted by mutant at 2014-05-27 09:12 PM | Reply | Flag:

#5 | Posted by Sniper

What the hell is your point with any of your posts?

#6 | Posted by SpeakSoftly

He Snipes..therefore he is.

#16 | Posted by donnerboy at 2014-05-28 04:08 PM | Reply | Flag:

Well almost all salmon is artificially colored to make it that orange-pink.

Farmed Salmon.

Not wild Salmon.

The best Salmon I have ever tasted is Copper River Salmon from Alaska.

It is naturally a beautiful bright red from the krill they eat while at sea.

It is hard to duplicate mother nature and it usually poses more environmental harm than good.

#17 | Posted by donnerboy at 2014-05-28 04:16 PM | Reply | Flag:

Well almost all salmon is artificially colored to make it that orange-pink.

Yea for sure.

real wild salmon looks dark bloody red like a piece of tuna or a steak.

#18 | Posted by ClownShack at 2014-05-28 04:17 PM | Reply | Flag:

real wild salmon looks dark bloody red like a piece of tuna or a steak.

True. It's because they get more exercise. That is why breasts and wings on domestic chickens and turkeys are white meat: those muscles don't used. But on ducks and wild turkeys the breasts and wings are dark meat because they fly when alive.

#19 | Posted by goatman at 2014-05-28 04:29 PM | Reply | Flag:

#19 | Posted by goatman

yes..the exercise is very important for color, too.

The Copper River Salmon have to swim 300 miles to the sea but they don't change color until they get there. It is the carotenoids in their diet which naturally turns salmon pink/red.

The Copper River Salmon eat an orange krill so in addition to all that exercise they get their color from the carotenoids in the krill they eat.

#20 | Posted by donnerboy at 2014-05-28 05:11 PM | Reply | Flag:

I think a valid question at this point in the history of civilization is can farm-raised anything be sustainable.

Agriculture is an amazing technology but like all technological innovations it brought with it unforeseen problems; for example 7.3 billion people.

I suspect we'll be growing meat in labs within twenty years out of sheer economic necessity. Cutting out the "middleman" by which I mean all the parts of the animal that consume raw materials that don't become food. Why put the time and effort and resources into a whole steer when you can grow just the cut you're after from stem cells?

#21 | Posted by snoofy at 2014-05-28 07:22 PM | Reply | Flag:

21 - yeah and in twenty years the average person will be able to 3D print an alloy based full auto assualt weapon that is used for a hole puncher too.

#22 | Posted by mutant at 2014-05-29 08:29 AM | Reply | Flag:

This is what farmed salmon get their color from: en.wikipedia.org

Uses[edit]
Astaxanthin is used as a feed supplement for salmon, crabs, shrimp, chickens and egg production.[26]

For seafood and animals[edit]
The primary use of synthetic astaxanthin today is as an animal feed additive to impart coloration, including farm-raised salmon and egg yolks.[14] Synthetic carotenoid pigments colored yellow, red or orange represent about 15–25% of the cost of production of commercial salmon feed.[27] Today, almost all commercial astaxanthin for aquaculture is produced synthetically from petrochemical sources.[28] While it constitutes a tiny portion of salmon feed (50 to 100 parts per million), astaxanthin represents a major share of the cost, up to 20%.[29](registration required)

Class action lawsuits have been filed against some major grocery store chains for not clearly labeling the salmon "color added".[29] The chains followed up quickly by labeling all such salmon as "color added". "...law-firm Smith & Lowney persisted with the suit for damages, but a Seattle judge dismissed [the case], ruling that enforcement of the applicable food laws was up to government and not individuals."[30]

That is what gives farmed salmon its orange "salmon" color. If you ever look at wild caught it is significantly redder from more natural and varied carotenoids. Also, has more omega 3's, as farming them tends to result in more omega 6 fatty acids showing up, reducing the beneficial balance of eating them. I also think it tastes noticeably better, but I could just be being snobby. The downside to wild caught is one really has to question sustainability and cost.

#23 | Posted by zeropointnrg at 2014-05-29 02:10 PM | Reply | Flag:

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