Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Monday, May 05, 2014

Texas Gov. Rick Perry (R) on Sunday blamed the state of Oklahoma for a “botched” execution of a death row inmate last week, but said his state will proceed with the death penalty without pause. "In Texas, our citizens have decided if you kill our children, if you kill our police officers, for those very heinous crimes, that the appropriate punishment is the death penalty,” Perry said on NBC's Meet the Press. Texas currently has 273 people on death row and has executed more than 500 people -- the most of any state -- since the Supreme Court reaffirmed the death penalty in 1976.

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Admin's note: Participants in this discussion must follow the site's moderation policy. Profanity will be filtered. Abusive conduct is not allowed.

Why would they?

#1 | Posted by Dalton at 2014-05-05 11:20 AM | Reply | Flag:

can't do the time...don't do the crime...

don't like the way we treat you....go murder someone in a state that ..in the words of Ron White..."wont kill you back'....

#2 | Posted by afkabl2 at 2014-05-05 11:20 AM | Reply | Flag:

Problem is, about 5% of those being executed in Texas are INNOCENT.

#3 | Posted by moder8 at 2014-05-05 11:22 AM | Reply | Flag: | Newsworthy 1

Come now Moder8.

Texans never make mistakes.

#4 | Posted by donnerboy at 2014-05-05 11:25 AM | Reply | Flag:

That makes 95% of them guilty. A+ for Texas.

#5 | Posted by BruceBanner at 2014-05-05 11:25 AM | Reply | Flag:

Problem is, about 5% of those being executed in Texas are INNOCENT.

#3 | Posted by moder8 at 2014-05-05 11:22 AM | Reply | Flag

You know this how?

#6 | Posted by Dalton at 2014-05-05 11:30 AM | Reply | Flag: | Newsworthy 1

again...this a problem?? go somewhere else....

#7 | Posted by afkabl2 at 2014-05-05 11:34 AM | Reply | Flag:

HEY I Bet Detroit is a good place to go rob, steal and then murder some child or a child's mother......

#8 | Posted by afkabl2 at 2014-05-05 11:35 AM | Reply | Flag:

The state killing an innocent person (aka murder) is not a problem in Texas. Go figure.

#9 | Posted by 726 at 2014-05-05 11:43 AM | Reply | Flag:

Is there actually less crime in Texas?

#10 | Posted by BruceBanner at 2014-05-05 11:51 AM | Reply | Flag:

According to census data, it's 15th highest in violent crime.

#11 | Posted by BruceBanner at 2014-05-05 11:54 AM | Reply | Flag:

Proving the death penalty is an effective deterrent.

#12 | Posted by 726 at 2014-05-05 12:20 PM | Reply | Flag:

Is there actually less crime in Texas?

#10 | Posted by BruceBanner at 2014-05-05 11:51 AM | Reply | Flag:

There is by those who have been executed to be sure.

#13 | Posted by e_pluribus_unum at 2014-05-05 12:24 PM | Reply | Flag:

Why should he.

#14 | Posted by tmaster at 2014-05-05 12:26 PM | Reply | Flag:

we 'rehabilitate' every murderer who's convicted and given the death penalty,....there has Never been a single case of a "rehabilitated" convicted having this sentence carried out of killing again...

#15 | Posted by afkabl2 at 2014-05-05 12:27 PM | Reply | Flag:

Problem is, about 5% of those being executed in Texas are INNOCENT.

#3 | Posted by moder8

I suppose you have proof to back up that statement. If you listen to the people on death row, only about 2% admit they are guilty of anything.

#16 | Posted by Sniper at 2014-05-05 12:30 PM | Reply | Flag: | Newsworthy 1

Why would they?

#1 | Posted by Dalton

Um... because the new injection methods appear to cause great suffering, and torture is still illegal?

Texas still considers itself bound by US law, doesn't it?

#17 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2014-05-05 12:31 PM | Reply | Flag:

According to census data, it's 15th highest in violent crime.

#11 | Posted by BruceBanner

Only because they are a border state and they took in so many people that were run out of LA by katrina.

#18 | Posted by Sniper at 2014-05-05 12:32 PM | Reply | Flag: | Newsworthy 1

Texas still considers itself bound by US law, doesn't it?

#17 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2014-05-05 12:31 PM | Reply | Flag:

Texas hasn't had a botched execution. It's not against the law unless it was intentional.

#19 | Posted by Dalton at 2014-05-05 12:34 PM | Reply | Flag:

Texas hasn't had a botched execution. It's not against the law unless it was intentional.

#19 | Posted by Dalton

The chemicals that were approved for injection by the court are no longer available. The states are now playing a chemical experiment guessing game with substitutes that have NOT been determined to be constitutional.

What rick perry is saying is he doesn't care about the law against torture and suffering. More macho headgames from the cowboys' head moron.

#20 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2014-05-05 12:40 PM | Reply | Flag:

The death penalty is not an effective deterrent. Throw that together with the sheer number of convictions that were overturned on DNA evidence in the past and the total lack of willingness of states like Texas to re-examine these old cases where DNA can now come into play and you might start to see the problem. (Yes, Texas does give a degree of access to DNA for testing by inmates.)

Personally, there are definitely cases that call for it. VERY few though and those with absolutely no doubts. Say for instances a Jeffery Dahmer type case... All too many cases have doubt. People are fallible and in court it is in all aspects: in presenting evidence, trying cases and judging. And all too often it is defendants without means to a quality defense that receive the death penalty - 'Justice' really does ride on the wealth you have in this country. The death penalty should be used in only the most extreme of cases, emotion must be put aside. In places like Texas it sometimes feels like any murder case is grounds.

#21 | Posted by GalaxiePete at 2014-05-05 12:41 PM | Reply | Flag: | Funny: 1 | Newsworthy 3

In places like Texas it sometimes feels like any murder case is grounds.

#21 | Posted by GalaxiePete

It is. Because texas is filled with insecure men desperate to prove their machismo be waving guns around and being tough on bad guys, especially if their skin is darker.

#22 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2014-05-05 12:48 PM | Reply | Flag:

guessing game with substitutes that have NOT been determined to be constitutional.

#20 | Posted by SpeakSoftly

WHAT??????????????????????????
? WTF are constitunal chemicals?????

#23 | Posted by Sniper at 2014-05-05 12:49 PM | Reply | Flag:

WHAT??????????????????????????
? WTF are constitunal chemicals?????

#23 | Posted by Sniper

The supreme court approved a SPECIFIC chemical combination to NOT be legally considered torture. Texas is NOT using the approved chemicals, therefore their executions are NOT constitutional.

Get it? Or do I need to draw it with crayons for you?

#24 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2014-05-05 12:53 PM | Reply | Flag:

Dead Gummit! Even if they're not guilty of what were killin' 'em for, they're guilty of somethin'.

#26 | Posted by DCTexan at 2014-05-05 01:14 PM | Reply | Flag:

Texas hasn't had a botched execution. It's not against the law unless it was intentional.

#19 | Posted by Dalton

BS. Unintentional torture is still torture. Just as an unintentional death is still a crime (manslaughter or "criminally negligent homicide"). If it was determined they tortured him they were criminally negligent.

The death penalty is not an effective deterrent. Throw that together with the sheer number of convictions that were overturned on DNA evidence in the past and the total lack of willingness of states like Texas to re-examine these old cases where DNA can now come into play and you might start to see the problem.

So true.

I think Texas is dragging it's feet on allowing Justice for these people (they will be forced eventually and the full truth will come out) is because I think many people, especially Texans, still confuse revenge with justice.

They are NOT the same.

"Social justice cannot be attained by violence. Violence kills what it intends to create." -- Pope John Paul II

#27 | Posted by donnerboy at 2014-05-05 02:40 PM | Reply | Flag:

"If it was determined they tortured him they were criminally negligent."

No one is going to be prosecuted over the botched execution. As far as what a pope says. I might listen to them when they stop settling court cases for pedophiles and moving them from church to church to hide their vile actions.

#28 | Posted by Dalton at 2014-05-05 03:37 PM | Reply | Flag:

could be worse:

At his trial, Gérard (assassin of William I of Orange) was sentenced to be brutally – even by the standards of that time – killed. The magistrates decreed that the right hand of Gérard should be burned off with a red-hot iron, that his flesh should be torn from his bones with pincers in six different places, that he should be quartered and disemboweled alive, his heart torn from his bosom and flung in his face, and that, finally, his head should be taken off.[1]

Gérard's torture was also very brutal. On the first night of his imprisonment Gérard was hung on a pole and lashed with a whip. After that his wounds were smeared with honey and a goat was brought to lick the honey off his skin with his rough tongue. The goat however refused to touch the body of the sentenced. After this and other tortures he was left to pass the night with his hands and feet bound together, like a ball, so sleep would be difficult. During the following three days, he was repeatedly mocked and hung on a pole with his hands tied behind his back. Then a weight of 300 metric pounds (150 kg) was attached to each of his big toes for half an hour. After this half hour Gérard was fitted with shoes made of well-oiled, uncured dog skin; the shoes were two fingers shorter than his feet. In this state he was put before a fire. When the shoes warmed up, they contracted, crushing the feet inside them to stumps. When the shoes were removed, his half-broiled skin was torn off. After his feet were damaged, his armpits were branded. After that he was dressed in a shirt soaked in alcohol. Then burning bacon fat was poured over him and sharp nails were stuck between the flesh and the nails of his hands and feet. Gérard is said to have remained calm during his torture. On 14 July 1584, Gérard was executed.[2][3]

#29 | Posted by tontonmacoute at 2014-05-05 03:49 PM | Reply | Flag:

"Texas won't pause executions"

That's what Oklahoma said until its last execution paused itself for over half an hour.

#30 | Posted by Derek_Wildstar at 2014-05-05 04:57 PM | Reply | Flag: | Newsworthy 1

That's what Oklahoma said until its last execution paused itself for over half an hour.

#30 | Posted by Derek_Wildstar

Well don't expect texans to learn from anyone else's mistakes. They need to make the mistakes themselves. Then they still won't learn. Sticking to what you think no matter what the evidence shows is considered tough and manly to them.

#31 | Posted by SpeakSoftly at 2014-05-05 05:22 PM | Reply | Flag:

Approved execution methods..
Why not use?
a firing squad..
gullition (sp?)..
a massive does of what they used to euthanize my cat last month..
massive doses of potassium chloride..

Come on, all these methods kill literally instantly. Why not?
Seriously, not trying to be too partisan here..

If we are only talking about doing the "job" quickly, humanely, and with as little pain as possible.

#32 | Posted by homerj at 2014-05-05 08:51 PM | Reply | Flag: | Newsworthy 1

#32: Or carbon monoxide. Completely painless

#33 | Posted by goatman at 2014-05-05 08:54 PM | Reply | Flag: | Newsworthy 1

#33. Yes. Thanks.
Or are they just trying to stop the whole process by saying nothing will be humane?

#34 | Posted by homerj at 2014-05-05 08:59 PM | Reply | Flag:

#32 | Posted by homerj

Not all of those methods are instantaneous. "Guillotine" leaves the head alive to suffocate, and there is a possibility of being shot but not killed with a firing squad. I don't know about the other ones, those might be instantaneous. I think the goal is to make sure they are not awake when they die so they can die peacefully in their sleep.

#35 | Posted by mariosanchez at 2014-05-06 12:08 AM | Reply | Flag:

So they can die peacefully in their sleep.
#35 | Posted by mariosanchez
That is better then their victims got. You wont have the majority of Americans feel sorry for these sickos feeling some pain when the are put to death. Hell we can't choose to die in such a peaceful way, instead we are forced to die a painful death in a nursing home. Shots to the heart in a bench rest with the correct size round makes it nearly perfect.

#36 | Posted by zack991 at 2014-05-06 06:34 AM | Reply | Flag:

The supreme court approved a SPECIFIC chemical combination to NOT be legally considered torture.

#24 | Posted by SpeakSoftly

Oh realy................ I guess it's in the constitution as to what chemicials you can use to poison someone.

Amendment VIII
Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.

I see nothing there that says the court has to approve of the poison. Hell, it dosen't even mention the death penelty and how it's to be carried out.

#37 | Posted by Sniper at 2014-05-06 12:51 PM | Reply | Flag:

I see nothing there that says the court has to approve of the poison. Hell, it dosen't even mention the death penelty and how it's to be carried out.

#37 | Posted by Sniper

Mostly because you cannot read or cannot comprehend English (or spell).

"nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted."

#38 | Posted by donnerboy at 2014-05-06 06:33 PM | Reply | Flag:

Carbon monoxide causes nausea, vomiting, and headache, I believe, so not completely peaceful. Leaves a lovely corpse though, I hear. Told undertakers love it since they remain nicely pink. Pure nitrogen - simply loss of consciousness and death. Yet when suggested, people turn it down as "too peaceful," proving the death penalty really is about revenge. Sad and pointless in a first world nation.

#39 | Posted by zeropointnrg at 2014-05-06 08:18 PM | Reply | Flag:

So waterboarding citizens, wiretapping them without a warrant, droning them without due process is somehow Constitutional, yet execution after fair trial and years of appeals are not?

By that logic Texas doesnt need courts or judges, just cops to arrest suspects, waterboard them, drop them off in the middle of a field and drone them with a Hellfire, perfectly legal according to this and the previous presidents EOs.

#40 | Posted by aescal at 2014-05-07 12:52 AM | Reply | Flag:

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