Drudge Retort: The Other Side of the News
Tuesday, April 29, 2014

For the first time since such data has been kept, 80 percent of America's high schoolers are graduating in four years, according to new data from the Department of Education. "It's really significant. After 30 years of flat-lining high school graduation rates and four successive U.S. presidents setting a 90 percent graduation goal, finally over the last decade we

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Admin's note: Participants in this discussion must follow the site's moderation policy. Profanity will be filtered. Abusive conduct is not allowed.

This sounds great.

Question: What can they do, and what do they know, when they graduate?

Answer: a very mixed bag.

And for further deep reform, we need stakeholders to stop arguing, get serious, listen, think, and plan... TOGETHER.

Well, gee, that's about as likely as Congress getting together and actually getting sh** DONE.

#1 | Posted by pragmatist at 2014-04-29 06:28 PM | Reply | Flag:

(Why, yes, I am feeling a bit negative and frustrated right now. What makes you ask?)

#2 | Posted by pragmatist at 2014-04-29 06:29 PM | Reply | Flag:

Less crankily, I should say this is good, this higher graduation rate. It's not entirely empty. And it is at least to a degree a good thing.

#3 | Posted by pragmatist at 2014-04-29 06:32 PM | Reply | Flag:

"Question: What can they do, and what do they know, when they graduate? "

I can only say this about it, my grand daughter will graduate this year, she is an excellent student and I am quite impressed with the level of knowledge she has. Great in math, history, English, etc. and her girl friend is just as well educated. 100% a product of public schools right here in S. Florida. Also, my grandson who is a Sophomore this year, doing very well, not straight A's though like his sister but he is also in ROTC and band and is a big time skateboarder after school and very popular with the ladies so he's spread pretty thin. Sometimes I think Americans like to focus on the kids who aren't trying, who have big problems with drugs, etc. when still the big majority of them are actually good kids, doing their school work, staying out of trouble. I do think TV somehow gives us a distorted view of young people today.

#4 | Posted by danni at 2014-04-29 07:20 PM | Reply | Flag:

As long as I'm bragging, the four year old grandson, who will be five soon, is reading pretty well. It's fun driving places with him cuz he'll say things like, "Grandma, what is Cevess?" I say to him "huh, what are you talking about?" Then he points to the sign in front of the CVS drug store. He's sounding out the letters but doesn't quite get the concept yet that some things are said just as the letters and aren't actually words.
That really did just happen a couple of weeks ago.

#5 | Posted by danni at 2014-04-29 07:25 PM | Reply | Flag:

It's easy to graduate in today's public schools where you are not required to learn much of anything.

#6 | Posted by moder8 at 2014-04-29 07:30 PM | Reply | Flag: | Newsworthy 1

Prag...

I hear you and feel your pain. I'm going through a unique situation with my brilliant but lazy senior as he's procrastinated to the point of blowing his college opportunity. My brief encounters with the staff (and he's at a small alternative facility for kids that can't handle the 2500 student suburban-jungle high school) has been great and I know how hard you guys care about and take care of your students. Bless you for doing all that you do. Rest assured there are legions of silent parents who both knowingly (and unknowingly) owe you a debt of gratitude far beyond your non-commiserate-worthy salaries.

All kids are different, but numbers are the same. It's impossible to quantify every situation down to numbers when it's the STUDENTS that matter, not just their scores and metrics. I guess what I'm trying to say is that students don't have to graduate to be "taught" many of life's lessons in school. I know you know what I'm saying. And even for that, we owe you big time and you have my eternal thanks - as do all teachers who give their hearts and souls, trying to turn out productive, energized young people excited about life and its wondrous opportunities.

Whenever you're feeling down, pick yourself up by reminding yourself at that very moment someone you've taught is adding something positive to the universe because they were somehow inspired by you.

What an awesome, awesome thing.

#7 | Posted by tonyroma at 2014-04-29 07:33 PM | Reply | Flag:

"It's easy to graduate in today's public schools where you are not required to learn much of anything."

I graduated in 1969, you didn't really need to learn anything back then either. I knew plenty of people who graduated that weren't able to do basic mathematics or write a decent paragraph. Some graduated with a pretty good high school education but many others graduated virtually illiterate. It's no different today.

#8 | Posted by danni at 2014-04-29 07:34 PM | Reply | Flag:

"I hear you and feel your pain. I'm going through a unique situation with my brilliant but lazy senior as he's procrastinated to the point of blowing his college opportunity."

WE had a similar situation with my grandson though he's only a Sophomore. We found him a senior class female student who was doing excellent and had her tutor him via Skipe and it worked amazingly well. He's now doing fine. YOu should talk to the school and see if they have a program of peer tutors, we found that the kids do better when helped by other kids.

#9 | Posted by danni at 2014-04-29 07:37 PM | Reply | Flag:

#6: Great moder8. Seldom do we agree, but I am 100% behind you on this.

#10 | Posted by goatman at 2014-04-29 07:40 PM | Reply | Flag:

So Goatman, you don't think it was easy to graduate in all the previous decades. YOu really believe that all my classmates, way back in 1969, were really educated better than the graduates of today? Sorry, I remember many of the idiots of my day, they were and still are idiots but they wore a cap and gown and graduated with the rest of us and I graduated in a state with a very good education system and from a great high school in Rhode Island.

#11 | Posted by danni at 2014-04-29 07:49 PM | Reply | Flag:

#9

Thanks Danni. He's got about 30 school days left and 14 credits to get. All he has to do is show up and he's golden, but that's been the problem. Lots of complicating factors - none life or health threatening - but impediments nonetheless. Almost there. He had an internet option but he has to show-up for the next month in order to finish.

Wish me luck.

#12 | Posted by tonyroma at 2014-04-29 07:50 PM | Reply | Flag:

WTF?
How did that happen?
Per pupil spending has been flat for about 8 years.

#13 | Posted by Huguenot at 2014-04-29 07:52 PM | Reply | Flag:

YOu really believe that all my classmates, way back in 1969, were really educated better than the graduates of today?

Yes I do, Danni. I am only a couple of years younger than you so I can honestly debate that point. I was there, too.

#14 | Posted by goatman at 2014-04-29 07:52 PM | Reply | Flag:

4: Great post! But of course, your grandchildren, assuming Grandma has some influence on her children, are more likely than many American children to care about education and to be respectful of teachers and the idea of school...

7: Beautiful, Tony. Thank you.

And btw, often when I'm feeling down about teaching, I watch this video: www.youtube.com

So yeah, thank you.

10: At the same time, Goat, I know you have a deeper understanding of education than that simple trope would indicate. And what Danni said. It's deeper than the simple brush-off. Kids who want to learn actually learn a great deal. And kids who want to push themselves can do amazing things. I know a kid from my rinky-dink HS who is currently working with a local college prof to refine her design and build a really cool medical device. She is far from a solid English student, but she does science proud. (Yes, I wrote it that way on purpose.)

#15 | Posted by pragmatist at 2014-04-29 07:52 PM | Reply | Flag:

"Wish me luck."

I do, but whatever happens, if the kid is really smart, he'll be ok anyway. My daughter had a couple of friends, actually a young couple who dropped out of high school together. Somehow she became a programmer earning mega bucks and he went in the Navy, tested so high he got into nuclear propulsion, and ended up making mega bucks. I don't try to predict the futures of these kids anymore because they surprise me so often.

#16 | Posted by danni at 2014-04-29 07:54 PM | Reply | Flag:

13: I think that was irony. If so, well done. If not, I'm not sure what you're up to.

14: I think that's awfully hard for either of you to say. We don't really know what we think we know from HS. We were kids, like the rest of them. And as adults, we don't really know major trends about what kids know unless we spend a LOT of time with a LOT of kids. Watching "Jaywalking" and basing our opinions on that, for instance, is, um, stupid. (Not that either of you are doing that, but I've seen people on this site extrapolate from just that segment. Dumb, dumb, and dumb.)

#17 | Posted by pragmatist at 2014-04-29 07:55 PM | Reply | Flag:

16: Right on! There are many paths to success.

#18 | Posted by pragmatist at 2014-04-29 07:55 PM | Reply | Flag:

"Yes I do, Danni. I am only a couple of years younger than you so I can honestly debate that point. I was there, too."

I don't know how to debate it, how can we compare "dumbness" of people who actually did graduate? I knew plenty of people who couldn't figure a percentage, couldn't write a decent sentence, couldn't tell you what the Yalta Conference was. They graduated though. From dealing with my grandchildren and their friends I think they are the same, some are well educated and some are slackers. I don't see that much difference between yesterday and today though the media seems to constantly try to convince us that there is a big difference.

#19 | Posted by danni at 2014-04-29 08:06 PM | Reply | Flag:

It's easy to graduate in today's public schools where you are not required to learn much of anything.

#6 | Posted by moder8 at 2014-04-29 07:30 PM | Reply |

I went to a private school and so did my wife. My grandkids (all boys) are all going to a public school due to my recalcitrant son-in-law. Fortunately, the schools where we live are consistently ranked in the top 3 in the state. All 3 are straight A students----of course that's not due to the genetics but teachers like Prag. I'm impressed with the teachers and the community bonds are great.

#20 | Posted by matsop at 2014-04-29 08:09 PM | Reply | Flag:

#15 | POSTED BY PRAGMATIST

Your link is FAR better than my idea.

Thanks so much for sharing it with me.

#21 | Posted by tonyroma at 2014-04-29 08:10 PM | Reply | Flag:

"Gains were made by all disadvantaged groups, including low-income students, students of color"

Finally these kids have great role-models in Mr and Mrs Obama, not just for "students of color" but ALL kids
Sammy in Arizona and Rhode Island

#22 | Posted by SammyAZ_RI at 2014-04-29 08:13 PM | Reply | Flag:

I don't know how to debate it, how can we compare "dumbness" of people who actually did graduate?

Fair enough, Danni.

#23 | Posted by goatman at 2014-04-29 08:14 PM | Reply | Flag:

Some graduated with a pretty good high school education but many others graduated virtually illiterate. It's no different today.
#8 | POSTED BY DANNI

You are right, its not different today.... just the numbers...
en.wikipedia.org

#24 | Posted by AndreaMackris at 2014-04-29 08:15 PM | Reply | Flag:

I think the pessimism about today's kids has not so much to do with them but more to do with the changes in our employment opportunities. Yesterday's high school graduate could go earn a living while today high school grades are increasingly important because they relate to college which is a requirement for a decent life style. Yesterdays high school graduates who didn't really have a very good education could earn a living because their labor was more valuable for a variety of reasons but today their "labor" is not worth very much money and so they need college which does mean they require a much better preperation than high school provided for those without motivation and intelligence yesterday or today. STudents today aren't graduating with less eduation when they receive a high school diploma but the amount of education they have at that point doesn't qualify them for any except the lowest paying jobs.

#25 | Posted by danni at 2014-04-29 08:17 PM | Reply | Flag:

Lower the bar low enough and everybody graduates.

And funny how "social sensitivity" is now history.

#26 | Posted by bogey1355 at 2014-04-29 08:19 PM | Reply | Flag:

I hear you and feel your pain. I'm going through a unique situation with my brilliant but lazy senior as he's procrastinated to the point of blowing his college opportunity.

#7 | Posted by tonyroma at 2014-04-29 07:33 PM | Reply

As much as you may not want to, you might suggest he look at the military. I had a similar child that was smart and only turned it on educationally when he needed to. When I suggested the military (from my perspective, he needed ongoing discipline)----he was adhd to the max. He thought I was nuts and after he found out I wasn't going to throw money at college any longer, he took the plunge. It was the best thing that ever happened to him. Now that he's out, he has a great job and currently is taking some pre courses in order to get a masters.

#27 | Posted by matsop at 2014-04-29 08:20 PM | Reply | Flag:

" Now that he's out, he has a great job and currently is taking some pre courses in order to get a masters."

Congratulations on successful parenthood, sometimes you have to get creative. Tough love is hard to administer but often the best kind.

#28 | Posted by danni at 2014-04-29 08:23 PM | Reply | Flag:

Congratulations on successful parenthood, sometimes you have to get creative. Tough love is hard to administer but often the best kind.

#28 | Posted by danni at 2014-04-29 08:23 PM | Reply

You're correct. I never laid a hand on him until one night he made a comment to his mother he should have never made. He was in high school at the time and I picked him up and pinned him against the fence and told him he better never speak to his mother like he had again---or something more physical was going to happen. He still talks about that today----I think it shocked him that his ever under control and patient father snapped. He's just a great son----we talk over the phone almost every night; until he found his current girl friend----funny how that changes things.

#29 | Posted by matsop at 2014-04-29 08:32 PM | Reply | Flag:

#20

I went to Catholic grade school through 8th grade and then to a suburban high school that was fairly cutting-edge for the times, the mid-70s. My education got me into Notre Dame on an academic scholarship.

My kid went to the same high school that I went to for a minute, and I was shocked at how much more rigorous the standards are now compared to my time. As I see it, the "average" education has increased because our advancing technology has made it both easier and mandatory that it must since the base of certain core-knowledge needs to be greater. Because all kids are inherently more tech savvy than the average parent, we just assume the fact that they waste most of their time utilizing the technology for their own interests means that little positive is coming through these experiences. For the majority, that just isn't so.

Kids today are getting a more practical education at the base and exponentially better at the high and low ends; moreover, the incredible choices available to take up one's educational time productively also means logically that our generation's rote learning of times, places and things can't possibly match up. The immediate availability of unlimited information was unheard of, and I feel far more informed today because of the plethora of sources and viewpoints than I ever remember as a child. It seems like that if you stimulate a child's imagination today, they merely have to lift a finger to gather the world's trove of knowledge on any subject, when all we had were books, magazines, and early media through the library.

#30 | Posted by tonyroma at 2014-04-29 08:38 PM | Reply | Flag:

#28, 29.

Total agreement.

Though my adolescent son and I had the usual spats, I didn't respond much until one evening. He was 16 YO and we were driving home. About 10 miles from there we started spatting about his grades. He turned to me, flipped me off and said, "F*** you".

I slammed on the brakes at 60 MPH and fishtailed to the side of the road and ordered him out of the car. Of course he didn't want to get out since we were so far from home.

LSS: I hated doing it, but things improved greatly after that incident. Today at 30 years old, he admits that event changed his way of thinking. Sometimes tough love is necessary.

#31 | Posted by goatman at 2014-04-29 08:39 PM | Reply | Flag:

Congratulations on successful parenthood, sometimes you have to get creative.

#28 | Posted by danni at 2014-04-29 08:23 PM | Reply |

By the way, Danni, thanks for the comment-----I'm glad we're through those wars. Now I get to listen to my daughter about her issues with her boys---although they don't seem to be as tough as what we had.One of the boys does all his work and then he won't hand in some of it -- it's driving her nuts. She doesn't understand it and has talked ad infinitum about it to him. Nothing seems to work. When he hands in his work he's a straight A student like his brothers. Maybe Prag has seen something like this and has suggestions.

#32 | Posted by matsop at 2014-04-29 08:40 PM | Reply | Flag:

#30 | Posted by tonyroma at 2014-04-29 08:38 PM | Reply

I believe that's a great point. Kids appear to gravitate to technology and it stimulates them right off the bat----it opens up opportunities that never existed before.

#33 | Posted by matsop at 2014-04-29 08:44 PM | Reply | Flag:

"I all going to a public school due to my recalcitrant son-in-law."

Money? Attitude? No need?

"Fortunately, the schools where we live are consistently ranked in the top 3 in the state. All 3 are straight A students----of course that's not due to the genetics but teachers like Prag."

Thank you.

"I'm impressed with the teachers and the community bonds are great."

Would that I worked in such a district. ;)

"Your link is FAR better than my idea."

Well, more dramatic anyway. :) You're welcome. His other stuff is good, too. But this is the best one I've seen. There's one called Viking Funeral (I think) that is amazing and heartwrenching.

"And funny how "social sensitivity" is now history."

Link, please.

And btw, I love hearing my DR mates' parenting stories. Naturally, some make me go "Yeah!" and some don't sit so well, but for the most part, you all sound like good parents who are/were deeply committed to your families. Kudos, friends. (Okay, enough of that crap. Shut up, you jerks. You're all stupid!)

#34 | Posted by pragmatist at 2014-04-29 08:44 PM | Reply | Flag:

"Maybe Prag has seen something like this and has suggestions."

Sorry, no wisdom here. I've seen far too much of the behavior you describe. It's better (generally) than the kids who do nothing, but it still adds up to a bad grade (generally), at least until test time. If they're that good at the work, they're probably pretty good at the tests. As a teacher, I've found no solution other than digging through kids' bags and binders, but that is, not to put too fine a point on it, not my job. Parents and students need to figure that stuff out, as far as I'm concerned. (And this could lead to a big discussion of grading and expectations, but I don't want to bore anyone any more than I usually do... :) )

#35 | Posted by pragmatist at 2014-04-29 08:47 PM | Reply | Flag:

#28-29

You know, I love threads like this when our true humanity comes out. To my friends on the right; even though we may eternally disagree, what I express is always what I really think is in the best interests for a positive outcome for the people involved; often far beyond my own personal self-interests. Hopefully, we all want what's best for everyone, not just ourselves.

I don't want to spoil the fellowship, so I'll close: I will never shy away from caring about my fellow man and in wanting what's best - even if my opinion differs from my brothers and sisters. All I ask is that we give each other the same deserved consideration.

#36 | Posted by tonyroma at 2014-04-29 08:48 PM | Reply | Flag:

I all going to a public school due to my recalcitrant son-in-law."

Money? Attitude? No need?

#34 | Posted by pragmatist at 2014-04-29 08:44 PM | Reply

Prag; he makes big bucks and could easily afford it. I've even thought about offering some financial help. My wife has a bigger problem with it then I do; she would rather they went to a Christian school.

He came from a public school background and I think that's the major driver---plus the schools in our district are topnotch. The irony is that most of the teachers are Christians. I believe if the schools were questionable from an academic standpoint, he would strongly consider the private school alternative.

Hey, note my #32---I would be interested if you have any suggestions.

#37 | Posted by matsop at 2014-04-29 08:51 PM | Reply | Flag:

#35 | Posted by pragmatist at 2014-04-29 08:47 PM | Reply |

Thanks, Prag. The only reason the child gets straight A's is because my daughter is on him constantly. The weird thing is he's done the work on time but just doesn't hand in some of it when he is supposed to.

#38 | Posted by matsop at 2014-04-29 08:54 PM | Reply | Flag:

Mats, my kids now go to private school--very oddly for me, a more or less Catholic school ("in the Catholic tradition"). It was a tough decision, but so far the right one (I think). We're not always thrilled, but at least they're surrounded by children from families who care about education--and that's the most important thing. This is also odd because I'm not only a public school teacher but of a public background myself; I'm an idealist and wannabe reformer, and I believe in the ideals of a public school system (as I believe in the ideals of our nation).

As for your question, I gave a (non)answer in #35. Sorry I can't be more helpful.

#39 | Posted by pragmatist at 2014-04-29 09:01 PM | Reply | Flag:

38: I know. That's a crazy thing that some kids do. I wonder how this manifests in adults we know...

If it's any consolation, this is not some rare bit of freakiness unique to this kid...

#40 | Posted by pragmatist at 2014-04-29 09:01 PM | Reply | Flag:

Public vs. Private schools.

I had three kids, the older two only attended public schools and had relatively mediocre outcomes though both have more than made up for that in real life and are doing well for themselves.

The youngest though, I had a little more money to educate and so I did. She attended public 1-6, private 7-11 and public for her senior year. I must admit, academically she was more successful and graduated summa cum laud with a double major for Florida Atlantic University which is one of the many state universities here in Florida.

I support public schools but some of the better private schools are better, but you have to be selective which one's you choose. Many or most are no better or even worse than the public schools.

#41 | Posted by danni at 2014-04-29 09:11 PM | Reply | Flag:

"Mats, my kids now go to private school--very oddly for me, a more or less Catholic school ("in the Catholic tradition")."

My daughter's wasn't more or less Catholic...it was Catholic and great! She begged me to let her attend public school for her senior year so she could graduate with her friends but she'll tell you today that Catholic high school changed the course of her life.

#42 | Posted by danni at 2014-04-29 09:13 PM | Reply | Flag:

ONe thing needs to be remembered about these "excellent" private schools though is that they have entrance examinations. Poor students don't get in.

#43 | Posted by danni at 2014-04-29 09:15 PM | Reply | Flag:

"Many or most are no better or even worse than the public schools."

Truer words never spoken. Those espousing otherwise are full of it. Or just ignorant.

42: Again, different paths... If we stay in this town, I expect our kids will stay in this school. It's amazingly reasonable for a private school... But also rather no-frills, which is fine by me. But I do need to talk to the older lad's teacher about her overreliance on movies. I love movies, and I teach Film, but I only ever use a movie if the kids do something with it. Something. And I hold that to be equally necessary for elementary kids as for high school kids. Maybe moreso.

#44 | Posted by pragmatist at 2014-04-29 09:17 PM | Reply | Flag:

43: Not true of all private schools. The most prestigious one (HS only) near us definitely has middle-class and poor kids. To what percentage, I don't know, but a colleague's wife works there so he has an insider's view.

#45 | Posted by pragmatist at 2014-04-29 09:19 PM | Reply | Flag:

"The most prestigious one (HS only) near us definitely has middle-class and poor kids."

The CAtholic School my daughter attended was certainly mostly well to do folks but everyone had to first pass the entrance exam, several of her friends tried and failed to get in.

#46 | Posted by danni at 2014-04-29 09:31 PM | Reply | Flag:

But what is the quality of the education leading to the diploma. Are the courses easier and was social promotion.

#47 | Posted by Donald at 2014-04-29 09:53 PM | Reply | Flag:

I don't know if this is a problem everywhere, but when I was going to high school, the problem I saw was the employment of coaches as teachers. I believe it may have been law in my state that all coaches had to teach, but it meant that some (most, though there were definitely exceptions to the rule) of the athletes were being just passed along through the grade levels by coaches who would make me look like teacher of the year (and if there is one thing I cannot do well, it is teach. Also, the athletes were allowed to cheat whenever they wanted and the teachers and principals seemed to essentially be peer-pressured into looking the other way. Just curious if anyone else has noticed this (but it isn't like my school district was uncorrupt by any sense of the imagination, we stuffed all of our minorities into one school) in any other areas of the country, it seemed like the easiest way to guarantee a diploma at the end of 4 years was to play a sport or cheer lead.

#9 | Posted by danni

Let's see.... 15 or 16 year old male... 17 or 18 year old female... Assuming that he is not homosexual, I can see how that would help!

#48 | Posted by mariosanchez at 2014-04-29 10:30 PM | Reply | Flag:

I graduated in 1969, you didn't really need to learn anything back then either.

#8 | Posted by danni

They damn sure didn't teach you anything about econ.

#49 | Posted by Sniper at 2014-04-30 01:16 PM | Reply | Flag:

Did any of you read this far down in the article?

The statistics released Monday show progress, albeit slight, on a national level for all subgroups. In 2010-11, for instance, black students had a 67 percent four-year graduation rate, which rose to 69 percent in 2011-12. A number of other subgroups had a similar two point gain: The average graduation rate for Hispanic students rose from 71 to 73 percent; the graduation rate for low-income students rose from 70 to 72 percent; the rate for students with disabilities rose from 59 percent to 61 percent; and the rate for students with limited English proficiency rose from 57 percent to 59 percent.

#50 | Posted by Sniper at 2014-04-30 01:22 PM | Reply | Flag:

50: I did. What's your point?

#51 | Posted by pragmatist at 2014-04-30 01:27 PM | Reply | Flag:

Look at the graduation rate for blacks and Mexicans. Not much to brag about pra. "The statistics released Monday show progress, albeit slight."

It is a move in the right direction but one very small step. [...]

#52 | Posted by Sniper at 2014-04-30 08:43 PM | Reply | Flag:

"They damn sure didn't teach you anything about econ."

Contrair, I learned Keynsian economics which saved this country, saved capitalism. Deny that and you deny reality.

#53 | Posted by danni at 2014-04-30 08:55 PM | Reply | Flag:

52: It doesn't, and what a bizarre suggestion. The article is clear about "slight," and that's fine. Was anyone on the thread suggesting a HUGE LEAP in improvement? I have read reports on this from various sources, and each one is clear that the improvements are small. As you say, step in the right direction.

#54 | Posted by pragmatist at 2014-05-01 09:42 AM | Reply | Flag:

Contrair, I learned Keynsian economics which saved this country, saved capitalism. Deny that and you deny reality.

#53 | Posted by danni

Like I said, you didn't learn economics.

#55 | Posted by Sniper at 2014-05-01 10:37 AM | Reply | Flag:

When I graduated high school in 1970 one tenth of the 360 seniors were honour students (myself included). Ten years ago my daughter graduated from the same high school with the same number of seniors but over one hundred were honour graduates. What changed? My class was before integration ( we are in the south) so having 30% of students black statistically should have pulled grades down. The answer is grade inflation. Many students attend "honours" classes that can have a 5.0 grade. This adds 1.0 to their grades. That middling 2.5 GPA is now a stellar 3.5.

#56 | Posted by jdmeth at 2014-05-01 12:51 PM | Reply | Flag:

"Like I said, you didn't learn economics."

Yeah, we didn't really build the largest and strongest economy in the world based on Keynsian economics did we?

#57 | Posted by danni at 2014-05-01 01:00 PM | Reply | Flag:

Yeah, we didn't really build the largest and strongest economy in the world based on Keynsian economics did we?

#57 | Posted by danni

Not only no but HELL NO!!!

#58 | Posted by Sniper at 2014-05-01 01:49 PM | Reply | Flag:

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